September 6 – Read a Book Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-we-forgot-brock

About the Holiday

No, I didn’t forget what holiday it is today—the day is I Forgot Day! Today is the day to make up for all those missed opportunities and make amends for forgetting special events. Of course it may also be the perfect day to trot out that most-used excuse for not doing something—and get away with it! One thing you should not forget is to read today’s book!

We Forgot Brock!

By Carter Goodrich

 

Phillip and Brock are best friends. They have a wonderful time goofing around together, but other people just can’t understand. They call Brock Phillip’s “imaginary friend.” As if!… For example, at dinner when Phillip says Brock wants seconds, Phillip’s mom only pretends to put food on Brock’s plate, and often Phillip’s dad almost backs over Brock’s motorcycle in the driveway. Philip’s parents also just don’t see how funny Brock can be.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-interior-art-dinner

Image copyright Carter Goodrich, 2015, courtesy of Simon & Schuster

One evening the whole family goes to the Big Fair. “‘Brock wants us to ride the Brain Shaker!’” says Phillip. But his parents won’t listen. “‘Tell Brock the Brain Shaker is a big kids’ ride,’” his dad says. At the fair Phillip and Brock ride the merry-go-round, the bumper cars, and the Tilt-A-Whirl. Phillip has cotton candy, but there are no beans and spaghetti snacks for Brock. Finally, Phillip begins to feel sleepy. But Brock? He’s riding the Brain Shaker!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-we-forgot-brock-merry-go-round

Image copyright Carter Goodrich, 2015, courtesy of Simon & Schuster

As the car pulls into the driveway, Phillip wakes up. “‘Where’s Brock?!’” he yells. Phillip runs into the house. No Brock. “‘We forgot Brock!’” Phillip sobs. “‘We Forgot Brock!’” Back at the fair Brock searches for Phillip from atop the Ferris wheel. Suddenly, a little girl asks him if he is okay. When Brock tells her he’s lost, she invites him to come home with her and her friend Princess Sparkle Dust.

Being at home with Anne and Princess Sparkle Dust is okay, but Brock misses Phillip. To cheer him up Anne and the Princess do magic tricks, and they all play games and tell each other stories. Meanwhile, Phillip is looking all over the neighborhood for Brock, but he’s nowhere to be found.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-interior-art-car

Image copyright Carter Goodrich, 2015, courtesy of Simon & Schuster

Both Brock and Phillip have almost given up hope of reuniting when… “‘BROCK!!!’” Phillip bumps into his friend on the street. Brock introduces Phillip to Anne and Princess Sparkle Dust and they all become fast friends. From then on “they spent all their time goofing around together. And everything was even better than before.”

Carter Goodrich’s story of friendship and imagination bursts with charm and heart and will enchant both kids and adults. Written in a conversational manner, Goodrich immediately engages with a child’s perspective while offering plenty for adults to appreciate in his adorable and hilarious illustrations. Brock, depicted as a black-and-white crayon drawing, is Phillip’s foil—tall, muscular, a little mysterious, a little fierce—while incorporating a child’s sweetness and silliness. Princess Sparkle Dust is similarly drawn in purple and white, complete with a heart-shaped face and a crown.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-we-forgot-brock-princess

Image copyright Carter Goodrich, 2015, courtesy of Simon & Schuster

 

Phillip, sporting a Superman costume and red cowboy boots, and Anne, wearing an angel dress complete with wings, everywhere they go are the embodiments of unselfconscious fantasy. Phillip’s parents share amused-but-loving glances even as they accept their son’s imaginary friend. Adults may laugh out loud at the illustration of Phillip rolling on the floor laughing at Brock’s funny antics while his parents watch the television news with a Keith Morrison look-alike anchorman. The softly lit and welcoming home environments as well as the vibrant, glowing Big Fair are everything a kid would dream them to be.

We Forgot Brock! is a book that will be remembered and asked for again and again, and is a must addition to any child’s library.

Ages 4 – 8

Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2015 | ISBN 978-1442480902

Visit Carter Goodrich’s Website to view a gallery of his work for other picture books and movies, such as Ratatouille, Despicable Me, and Brave, as well as cover art for “The New Yorker” and other publications.

Read a Book Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dog-bookmark

 

Cute Puppy Bookmark

 

When you want to save your place or remember a favorite picture, it’s fun to have a friend to come back to. With this printable Cute Puppy Bookmark you’ll always have a 

August 26 – Women’s Equality Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s holiday commemorates the date in 1920 when the 19th Amendment to the Constitution granted women the right to vote. The observance of Women’s Equality Day also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality, including equal pay, equal opportunities for education and employment, freedom from discrimination and violence, and equal standing in all communities and situations. Workplaces, libraries, organizations, and public facilities now participate with Women’s Equality Day programs, displays, video showings, or other activities.

I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark

Written by Debbie Levy | Illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley

 

Ruth Bader grew up during the 1940s in Brooklyn, New York’s multicultural neighborhood. It was a time when boys were educated for jobs and bright futures while girls were expected to marry and raise children. Ruth’s mother, Celia Amster Bader, however, “thought girls should also have the chance to make their mark on the world.” She introduced Ruth to books in which she discovered women who used their strength, courage, and intelligence to do big things.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-in-the-library

Image copyright Elizabeth Baddeley, text copyright Debbie Levy. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Ruth also saw and felt the sting of prejudice while growing up. Her family was Jewish, and at the time “hotels, restaurants, even entire neighborhoods” denied access to Jews, African Americans, Mexicans, and others. Ruth disagreed and never forgot. She was even discriminated against for being left-handed. In school she was instructed to write with her right hand, but her awkward penmanship earned a D. First, she cried; then she protested by only writing with her left hand—“it turned out she had quite nice handwriting!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-in-the-left-handed

Image copyright Elizabeth Baddeley, text copyright Debbie Levy. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

During elementary school, Ruth was outstanding in some classes, such as history and English, and did not do so well in others, such as sewing and cooking. Music, especially opera, was another favorite subject—even though she did not have the voice to match her dreams. She excelled in high school and was even chosen as a graduation speaker. But Ruth had been hiding the fact that her mother was very ill. The day before graduation, her mother died. Ruth did not go to her graduation, but she did fulfill her mother’s wish and entered college.

In college Ruth met Marty Ginsberg, and the two fell in love. They both decided to become lawyers to fight prejudice and unfairness in court. People thought this was a great idea for Marty, but disapproved of it for Ruth. “Ruth disapproved right back. So did Marty.” After college they got married, went to law school, and had a baby girl.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-college

Image copyright Elizabeth Baddeley, text copyright Debbie Levy. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

In law school Ruth was one of nine women in a class of 500. She worked hard and tied with another student as first in the class, but after graduation she couldn’t find a job. Employers objected because she was a woman, a mother, and Jewish. Finally, she found work with a judge. Her excellent work for him translated into jobs at one law school after another, and she became “one of the few female law professors in the whole country.”

All around her Ruth saw other women who were denied jobs or paid less than men. Women also had very little voice in courtrooms or in government. Rulings by the Supreme Court, the highest court in America, had helped maintain this inequality. The Court had stated that women were unfit for many jobs because of their “natural and proper timidity and delicacy.” Besides, the Supreme Court also said, “Woman has always been dependent upon man.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-in-the-law-school

Image copyright Elizabeth Baddeley, text copyright Debbie Levy. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

“Ruth really, really disagreed with this!” So she began fighting in court for equal rights for women. But equal rights for women also meant equal rights for men: Ruth believed men should be able to stay home with children if they wanted to while women worked. “These were fresh ideas in the 1970s. Ruth did not win every case, but she won enough. With each victory, women and men and girls and boys enjoyed a little more equality.”

At home, Ruth’s own family agreed with her. Marty was a successful lawyer and also an accomplished chef who cooked the family’s meals. Ruth went on to become a well-known and well-respected lawyer. President Jimmy Carter asked her to be a judge in Washington DC. Then President Bill Clinton chose her to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court. “Ruth agreed.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-family-life

Image copyright Elizabeth Baddeley, text copyright Debbie Levy. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

“In 1993, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg became the first Jewish woman on the nation’s highest court.” When the nine justices decide a case, they listen to both sides and then vote. The winning side then writes an opinion explaining their ruling. When Justice Ginsburg votes with the winning side, she wears a special lace collar over her robe. When she does not agree with the ruling, she says, “I dissent” and writes an opinion explaining why. She has a special collar for dissenting too.

Some of her dissensions were influenced by her early experiences. She dissented when “the court wouldn’t help women or African Americans or immigrants who had been treated unfairly at work. She dissented when the court did not protect voting rights for all citizens. She dissented when the court disagreed with schools that offered African Americans a better chance to go to college.” And once when she dissented, Congress and the president agreed with her and overturned the Supreme Court’s ruling.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-dissent-supreme-court

Image copyright Elizabeth Baddeley, text copyright Debbie Levy. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is now the oldest member of the Supreme Court. Some people think she should retire, but she disagrees. She still has work to do. Over the years, she has “cleared a path for people to follow in her footsteps—girls in college, women in law school, and everyone who wants to be treated without prejudice….Step by step, she has made a difference…one disagreement after another.”

An extensive Author’s Note about Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s life, notes on Supreme Court Cases, and a selected bibliography follow the text.

Debbie Levy’s outstanding biography allows readers to journey with Ruth Bader Ginsburg as her experiences and beliefs lay the foundation for her life’s work. Well-chosen anecdotes from Ginsburg’s childhood make her accessible to kids and may even inspire them to look toward their own futures. Ginsburg’s trajectory from college student to lawyer to judge and finally to the Supreme Court is balanced and uplifting, emphasizing the positive impact of persistence and self-confidence.

Elizabeth Baddeley’s illustrations go hand-in-hand with Levy’s text to fully illuminate the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg for children. Ginsburg’s intelligence, sense of humor, courage, and principles are evident as she matures from school girl to Supreme Court Justice. Dynamic typography highlights the theme of dissent and disagreement as a force for positive change. The color, expression, and spirit imbued in each page make I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark an exciting and eye-catching read for all children.

I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark is a superb and recommended book for girls and boys. The book’s focus on a woman who continues to make a difference will inspire children and even adult readers to speak up and act on their convictions.

Ages 5 – 9

Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2016

To learn more about Debbie Levy and her books for children and young adults, visit her website!

Discover a gallery of illustration by Elizabeth Baddeley on her website!

Women’s Equality Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-rosie-the-riveter-coloring-page

Rosie the Riveter Coloring Page

 

Rosie the Riveter became a symbol of strong women during World War II and continues to be an iconic figure today. Print and color this Rosie the Riveter Page then display it to always remember that women can do anything!

Picture Book Review

August 6 – National Sisters Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-day-cover

About the Holiday

If you have a sister—either through family or friendship, today is the day to celebrate her and your special relationship! Sisters tell secrets, do things together, laugh and commiserate together, and share a lifetime of love. If your sister lives close, why not plan a special outing today? If she lives far away, text or call and catch up!

Sister Day!

Written by Lisa Mantchev | Illustrated by Sonia Sánchez

 

As Lizzie and her big sister, Jane, sit on a quilt watching the clouds, Lizzie tells how she loves that Jane has “the best imagination” and “can make up all kinds of things in her very own head.” Lizzie wants to play dress up, but Jane says, “not now.” How about telling a story? Jane can’t do that either because she’s going to her friend Emma’s house soon. “‘Maybe when you get home?’” Lizzie asks. “‘Maybe,’” says Jane.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-day-picnic

Image copyright Sonia Sánchez, 2017, text copyright Lisa Mantchev, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Jane is gone all day. Night falls and still Jane isn’t home. Lizzie waits in the window seat and watches and watches. Finally, Jane is home! Lizzie shows her the fort she made using all the blankets. It will be perfect for telling stories under, but now Jane has to do her homework. “‘You’re always busy.’” Lizzie says. The next day the sisters look at the calendar. It’s almost full except for one Saturday. Suddenly, Lizzie has an idea for a wonderful surprise. She takes the pink crayon and “circles, circles, circles that Saturday.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-day-waiting

Image copyright Sonia Sánchez, 2017, text copyright Lisa Mantchev, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

On Monday while Jane has soccer practice, Lizzie works on a dragon referee. On Tuesday instead of copying Jane’s jumps and twirls at ballet, Lizzie puts “tutus on sugarplum fairies.” On Wednesday during Jane’s piano lesson, Lizzie tunes up her imaginary orchestra. Thursday is karate day, and while Jane does her moves, Lizzie “sneaks, sneaks, sneaks to a quiet corner to finish up [her] surprise.” On Friday Jane goes to Emma’s again after school, and Lizzie gets help from Mom baking Jane’s favorite treat.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-day-soccer

Image copyright Sonia Sánchez, 2017, text copyright Lisa Mantchev, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Early Saturday morning, Lizzie grabs her sketchbook, her scissors, and some tape. It takes an hour and the whole roll of tape to make the surprise. Then Lizzie goes to Jane’s room. She knocks on the door. When there’s no answer, Lizzie opens the door. Jane’s room is empty. Lizzie runs “downstairs, yelling, ‘Mom, have you seen Jane?’” When Lizzie enters the kitchen, she finds Jane “wearing a T-shirt covered in glittery glue.” She made them at Emma’s house, Jane says as she hands one to Lizzie. 

Lizzie puts it on and pulls Jane into the living room. Pictures and decorations cover the walls, and delicious cupcakes and drinks are on the table. “‘Surprise! I wrote you a story!’” Lizzie says. “‘Happy Sister Day!’” As Jane looks around, she tells Lizzie, “‘You didn’t just draw a story, Lizzie. You made a whole lot of magic.’” Lizzie hugs her big sister. “‘It runs in the family,’” she says.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-day-surprise

Image copyright Sonia Sánchez, 2017, text copyright Lisa Mantchev, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Lisa Mantchev captures the happiness and disappointments of sibling relationships in her sweet story. In today’s busy family life, sisters—and brothers—don’t always get to spend as much time together as they might like. Mantchev reveals, however, that close bonds remain in the heart. Young readers will be enchanted by this loving sister duo and the surprise ending that shows a shared understanding and devotion between them. Sister Day! may inspire families to hold special sister and or brother days to let siblings connect and develop their unique relationship.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-day-calendar

Image copyright Sonia Sánchez, 2017, text copyright Lisa Mantchev, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

In her beautiful, light illustrations, Sonia Sánchez replicates the positive, happy relationship between Lizzie and Jane. As each day brings a new activity for Jane, readers will recognize the reality of a younger sibling waiting for the older one to finish. As Lizzie uses this time to draw her story, children will see that even though Lizzie and Jane aren’t together, they are thinking of each other. Lizzie’s imagination is creatively shown through transparent fantasy creatures who keep Lizzie company during Jane’s absence. Sánchez’s lovely color palette and delicate, detailed drawings invite children to spend time with these best-friend sisters.

Sister Day! would make a wonderful gift and a charming addition to sisters’ home libraries

Ages 4 – 8

Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481437950

Discover more about Lisa Mantchev and her books for children, young adults, and adults on her website!

National Sisters Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sister-printable

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-celebrate-frame-border

Sisters are Forever Friends Coloring Page and Frame

 

Sisters are life-long friends! Show your sister how much you love her by printing out, coloring, and giving her this Sisters are Forever Friends Coloring Page. You can make it into a picture to hang with this printable Celebration Frame.

Picture Book Review

June 21 – Make Music Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-ada's-violin-cover

About the Holiday

Make Music Day first rang out in 1982 in France as the Fête de la Musique. Celebrated by young and old, professional musicians and amateurs, the day invites all to make and share their music. People in more than 750 cities and towns in over 120 countries participate in this creative holiday.

Ada’s Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay

Written by Susan Hood | Illustrated by Sally Wern Comport

 

Ada Ríos is growing up in Cateura, a town built of trash as the main garbage dump for the capital city of Paraguay. Every morning the refuse trucks rumble into town to deposit their loads—1,500 tons of trash every day. The citizens of Cateura—gancheros or recyclers—go to work sifting through the mounds and tearing into bags looking for anything valuable enough to recycle or sell. Cardboard is worth 5 cents a pound, plastic 10 cents a pound.

Ada knows the landfill can hold surprises—“Her father, a ganchero, had found appliances, toys, perfumes, and antique watches.”—but she can never imagine what it holds for her. When Ada and her sister were little, their grandmother watched them while their parents worked. They loved to listen to music, to sing, and to learn stories of musicians and the sounds of different instruments. Ada fell in love with the violin.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-ada's-violin-making-singing

Image copyright Sally Wern Comport, text copyright Susan Hood. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

As the girls grow older and go to school, they venture farther into town, but there is little to fill their time. Many kids join gangs or get into fights. When Ada is 11 her grandmother signs her and her sister up for music lessons being offered by a new man in town named Favio Chávez. “Ada’s heart sang out” when she hears the news. On the first day ten children show up to play the five instruments available. But a bigger problem looms: the three guitars and two violins cannot be taken home for practicing as they are magnets for thieves. In Cateura a violin is worth more than a house.

But Favio Chávez has an idea. With help from Nicolás Gómez, a ganchero and carpenter, they pull bits and pieces from the landfill. An old broken drum and an X-ray film become a workable drum, water pipes become flutes, packing crates become guitars and violins, and oil drums become cellos. “Ada chose a violin made from an old paint can, an aluminum baking tray, a fork, and pieces of wooden crates. Worthless to thieves, it was invaluable to her. It was a violin of her very own.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-ada's-violin-making-instruments

Image copyright Sally Wern Comport, text copyright Susan Hood. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

The children practice tirelessly outside in 100-degree heat until the initial “screeches, twangs, and tweets hit all the right notes. Their class became ‘a small island’ where Chávez taught them to respect themselves and one another.” They become known as The Recycled Orchestra. Music now fills the air, adding a soundtrack of beauty to the grueling work. The orchestra is soon invited to play concerts in Cateura and the capital city of Asunción. When word spreads of their talent, the children receive offers to play from other cities and even other countries.

When Ada is 16 The Recycled Orchestra is invited to tour with a world-famous rock band. As Ada takes the stage in front of 35,000 people in Bogotá, Colombia, she is afraid, but the audience cheers for them and sings along as they play. On that night the children discover a new life. “Buried in the trash was music. And buried in themselves was something to be proud of.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-ada's-violin-lessons

Image copyright Sally Wern Comport, text copyright Susan Hood. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

An extensive author’s note plus a photograph of The Recycled Orchestra, lists of websites, videos and sources follow the text.

Ada’s Violin is also available in a Spanish edition—El violín de Ada: La Historia de la Orquesta de Instrumentos Reciclados del Paraguay.

Susan Hood has brought to light an incredible story of perseverance, hope, and the ability of music and other arts to provide opportunities and self-confidence that change lives. Told with unstinting honesty and sensitivity, Hood’s biography of Ada Ríos, Favio Chávez, and The Recycled Orchestra will inspire all who read it. The well-paced text offers revealing details on every page and flows with a lyrical quality that enhances the effect of the story and its impact. From the first sentence to the last, both children and adults will be riveted to The Recycled Orchestra.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-ada's-violin-hope

Image copyright Sally Wern Comport, text copyright Susan Hood. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

Sally Wern Comport’s paintings beautifully capture the human spirit that shines through and drives people to astonishing achievements even in the most adverse conditions. With intricately created collages of rich hues, Comport depicts the town of Cateura and the mountains of trash the citizens work and play on. Warm lighting illuminates faces full of dreams and love. Readers will linger over depictions of the instruments workshop and cheer along with the concert audience as the children receive recognition. The full-bleed, two-page spreads echo the expanded world music gave to the children in the orchestra and the adults who heard them as music score confetti flutters throughout.

Both school classrooms and home libraries will benefit from the stirring message of Ada’s Violin.

Ages 4 and up

Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2016 | ISBN 978-1481430951 (English edition); 978-1481466578 (Spanish edition)

Discover more about Susan Hood and her books, plus fun activities for kids and information for teachers and parents on her website!

View a gallery of Sally Wern Comport’s artwork on her website!

Make Music Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-homemade-musical-instrument

 

Make Your Own Musical Instrument

 

Inspiration for sound can come from almost any object! Look around your house or classroom and discover the music in boxes, cans, blocks of wood, plastic egg cartons or deli containers, and more. Add string or wire for plucking, sticks for drumming, or beans for shaking. With a little glue, tape, or hardware and some creativity, you’ll be making your own rhythms in no time!

Supplies for the stringed instrument shown in the picture above

  • Tin can
  • Two small L brackets
  • Piece of wooden molding, 2 1/2 feet by 1 1/2 inches by 3/4 inches
  • Five small strips of wood to raise the wire off the neck of the instrument. I used long wooden fireplace matches cut into 1 1/2″ sections 
  • Thin wire
  • Small circular hook screw or regular screw
  • Two tacks
  • A nail, screw, or piece of wood that will fit horizontally in the mouth of the can
  • a small nail to make a hole in the can
  • Hammer
  • Strong Glue
  • Paint
  • Foam decorative dots

Directions

  1. Paint the wood and let dry
  2. Paint the small strips of wood and let dry
  3. Decorate the can with paint, sticker, duct tape, or paper
  4. With the hammer and small nail, make a hole in the center of the bottom of the can
  5. Wrap one end of the wire around the nail and glue so it is firmly in place
  6. Feed the other end of the wire through the hole in the bottom of the can
  7. Screw or glue two L brackets to one end of the wood molding so that the bottom of the L is flush with the bottom of the wood molding and there is space between the brackets. This makes the neck of the instrument
  8. Screw the circular or regular screw into the top, center of the wooden molding
  9. When the wooden match strips are dry, glue three match strips side-by-side 3 inches from the top of the molding. Glue two more match strips, one on top of the other on the center strip.
  10. When the L brackets are dry, glue them (and the neck of the instrument) to the can, making sure the brackets are on either side of the hole in the can. Make sure the wire is out of the hole. 
  11. When the brackets are firmly attached to the can, pull the wire to the top of the neck. Settle it in the center of the small pieces of wood, so that the wire is not touching the neck.
  12. Wrap the wire around the screw at the top of the molding until it is firmly in place and the wire is taut. 
  13. Secure the wire to the neck with the tacks
  14. Mark the “frets” with the foam dots

Picture Book Review

 

April 16 – Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-piggies-in-pajamas-cover

About the Holiday

Forget about Casual Friday, Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day offers much more in the way of comfort and coziness—as those who work from home well know! A little research on pajamas finds that the word derives from a Persian term for “leg garment.” Draw string pants were popular in Southwest Asia and were brought to the attention of other areas of the world by British colonials. The Western world adopted these comfy pants in the 1800s, and since then bed wear has become softer, more flexible, and more colorful. To celebrate today, wear your favorite jammies to work—and don’t forget your teddy bear!

Piggies in Pajamas

Written by Michelle Meadows | Illustrated by Ard Hoyt

It’s bedtime for the little piggies, but Papa isn’t home yet and Mama’s on the phone. So the five rambunctious kids find ways to spend the time. A peek into their room finds “Piggies in pajamas / jumping in the air / tossing up the pillows / popcorn in their hair.” The quadruple bunk beds make tall mountains to climb and perfect platforms for jumping into the ocean, but as the piggies dive onto the soft, pillow “water,” they hear Mama’s footsteps in the hall.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-piggies-in-pajamas-mom-on-phone

Image copyright Ard Hoyt, text copyright Michelle Meadows, 2013. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

The piggies “hurry to the tunnel. / Everybody, hide. / Underneath the covers, snuggle deep inside.” Soon all seems quiet, so they tiptoe from their beds to spy on Mama. They’re happy to see that she’s still occupied, leaving the tracks clear for the piggie train to toot, toot across the floor. But Mama, in her curlers, hears a suspicious sound and stomp, stomp, stomps upstairs.

Once more the five siblings rush to their beds and pull up the covers, their ears trained on any sound from downstairs. A familiar “crick, creak” tells them that Mama is now sitting down and chatting with Mrs. Cat. “Piggies in pajamas, / whirl around the room. / Cartwheels and somersaults— / Boom, Boom, Boom!” All that noise brings Mama stomp, stomp, stomping, but when she opens the piggies’ door, they’re all snuggled in and quiet as mice.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-piggies-in-pajamas-parade

Image copyright Ard Hoyt, text copyright Michelle Meadows, 2013. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

One sneaky eye watches Mama as she descends the stairs on her way to the kitchen for an evening snack. In moments, the little ones are up again and searching through the trunk for toys and cars and dress-up clothes. Just then at the window they hear a “scratch, scratch, tap, tap” and although it’s only a tree branch waving in the wind, the imagined wolf or fox or bear has left them shivering.

One by one, all in a line they grab their blankets and crawl down the hall to a new cozy bed. While Mama’s washing up her face, they cuddle in and start to snooze. Soon, “Mama sees their pink ears. / Tails are sticking out. / Mama climbs into bed and / kisses every snout. / ‘Good night, piggies!’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-piggies-in-pajamas-kisses

Image copyright Ard Hoyt, text copyright Michelle Meadows, 2013. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

The little piggies in Michelle Meadow’s sweet story want to do the right thing, but it’s just so exciting to stay up late! Readers know how they feel and will giggle along as the piggies romp when Mama’s gone but fly into bed when they hear her stomps. Meadow’s jouncy rhyme captures the freewheeling antics of unsupervised kids, the delicious suspense of getting caught, and the endearing appeal for comfort when kids are scared or truly ready to drift into dreams.

Ard Hoyt’s energetic piggies know how to make the most of Mama’s inattention! Bouncing on the bed with their popcorn snack, climbing a rope made of sheets to the top of the bedpost “mountain,” and strutting down the hall in a piggie train, these five siblings are as cute as can be. Hoyt’s split pages show both the expressive siblings and Mama as they go about their nightly routines, acting and interacting on the sounds they hear. The soft colors, humorous details, and final spreads of the piglets in Mama’s bed, tell readers that despite all the shenanigans, this is a house full of love.

Piggies in Pajamas would quickly become a bedtime favorite and a welcome addition to home bookshelves.

Ages 2 – 5

Simon & Schuster, 2013 | ISBN 978-1416949824

Discover more about Michelle Meadows and her books as well as teachers activities on her website!

You can learn more about Ard Hoyt and view a gallery of his books on his website!

Wear Your Pajamas to Work Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pajamas-coloring-page

Design Your Own Pajamas

Are pajama sleepers or tops and pants your favorites for bedtime? With this printable Design Your Own Pajamas coloring sheet, you can create jammies just the way you like them!

Picture Book Review

April 11 – National Library Workers Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-library-day-cover

About the Holiday

Held annually on the Tuesday of National Library Week, National Library Workers Day honors all of the staff across the country in libraries big and small. Librarians have a vast wealth of knowledge to help readers find just the right book, aid researchers in discovering the perfect resources, create engaging programs for children and adults, and keep up to date on publishing trends. Without libraries and librarians, our lives would be much less rich. Today, visit your library, check out a book or two, and thank your librarian!

Library Day

Written by Anne Rockwell | Illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell

 

On a particular Saturday a little boy makes his first trip to the library with his dad. Dad has a stack of books to return, and before the two go through the door, Don gets to drop the books in the return slot. First stop is the children’s room, where story hour is about to begin. While Don settles in, Dad heads for the grown-up shelves to look for a new book to borrow.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-library-day-going-into-children's-room

Image copyright Lizzy Rockwell, text copyright Anne Rockwell, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

There are already four children sitting in a circle around the librarian, Mrs. Edmonds. Don recognizes one of the boys from the playground and sits next to him. Mrs. Edmonds has chosen to read The Three Sillies today. Next, Mr. Miguel “reads a story from his homeland of Puerto Rico.” The story is about a donkey, and Don and the other kids laugh “when Mr. Miguel goes, ‘Hee-haw! Hee-haw!’ as loud as he can.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-library-day-meeting-jack

Image copyright Lizzy Rockwell, text copyright Anne Rockwell, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

After story hour, the other little boy, Jack, introduces himself and shows Don around the children’s room. There are shelves with movies and a rack full of magazines. Don especially likes the magazine about dogs and one about farm animals. Mr. Miguel notices that Don likes reading about nature and shows him a book about snakes. Don shows Mr. Miguel a book he also likes about a truck. “‘You can take them all home,’ Mr. Miguel says.”

Next to the picture book shelves, Don sees a baby “sitting on the floor with lots of books to read. Except the baby is reading her book upside down.” She burbles as she looks at and turns the pages, “but her book is still upside down.” By this time Jack has gone home, but Don continues to explore. Two bigger kids are playing chess, two girls are making bookmarks, and an older boy is working on the computer.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-library-day-mr.-miguel

Image copyright Lizzy Rockwell, text copyright Anne Rockwell, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

Don finds a comfortable chair and begins paging through the book on snakes. Just then a librarian sets a new book on the shelf next to him. It’s about apples and pumpkins—two things Don likes—so he grabs that one to take home too. When Dad comes back, Don shows him the four books he wants to check out. Sure! Dad says. “And then he says, ‘But you will need your own library card.’” Don is thrilled. “My own library card!” he thinks.

At the front desk, Don hands Mrs. Edmonds his books. To get his library card, Don tells her his name and address then waits “a few minutes while lights on her machine go on and off as it rumbles.” In a minute, Mrs. Edmonds hands him a card with his “own name written on the back.” Then Mrs. Edmonds scans his card and the books and tells Don the books are due in two weeks.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-library-day-seeing-books

Image copyright Lizzy Rockwell, text copyright Anne Rockwell, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

As Don and his dad are leaving the library, they notice a poster for The Gingerbread Man Puppet Show. “‘Would you like to go see that puppet show next Saturday?’” Don’s dad asks. “‘I sure would!’” Don exclaims before taking his dad’s hand as they cross the street toward home.

Anne Rockwell’s gentle and engaging introduction to the library is full of the joy and wonder little ones have when visiting this favorite place. Her straightforward storytelling is both inviting and comforting as readers learn about the various spaces in a children’s room and the programs offered. Rockwell captures the excitement children feel in finding books that reflect their interests as well as the thrill of getting their own library card.

Lizzy Rockwell’s bright, colorful illustrations provide charming snapshots of a library children’s room that will delight readers. All the pleasures of a trip to the library are here, from making new friends to giggling during story time to discovering the wealth of fun things to do. After reading Library Day, kids will be eager to visit their local library!

Ages 3 – 8

Aladdin, Simon & Schuster, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481427326

Discover more about Anne Rockwell and her many books on her website!

View galleries of artwork and learn more about Lizzy Rockwell and her books on her website!

National Library Workers Day Activitycelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mouse-with-books-coloring-page

Library Mouse Coloring Page

 

This mouse likes to read almost as much as you do! Print this Library Mouse Coloring Page and have fun!

Picture Book Review

March 31—Eiffel Tower Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-antoinette-cover

About the Holiday

Today we say Ooh-La-La for one of the world’s most striking and recognizable monuments—the Eiffel Tower. The tower was erected in 1889 for the International Exhibition of Paris, which celebrated the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution. Construction took 2 years, 2 months, and 5 days. This iconic landmark was named for the chief engineer, Gustave Eiffel, and has inspired generations of locals and visitors alike.

Antoinette

Written by Kelly DiPucchio | Illustrated by Christian Robinson

 

On a day which seemed like most others, Mrs. Bulldog spied out the window at her puppies playing in the yard. Rocky, Ricky, Bruno, and Antoinette scrambled around, chasing each other back and forth. They darted through the door and dashed around the kitchen. They are always so energetic “and ridiculously cute, but please don’t tell them that.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-antoinette-in-the-yard

Image copyright Christian Robinson, text copyright Kelly DiPucchio. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

When Mrs. Bulldog looked at her children, she knew that each was special. The boys had already demonstrated some of their talents. “Bruno was strong, Rocky was clever, and Ricky was fast.” Antoinette was still pondering her unique talent, but her mother was not worried. “‘You have something extra special. I can feel it in my bones!’” she told her daughter, but Antoinette had some doubts.

“Every day the family went to the park to play with their doggy friends,” and this day was no different. When they got there, Antoinette was happy to see Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo, Ooh-La-La, and especially Gaston. The puppies frolicked on the lawn, racing around after balls and butterflies and enjoying tasty biscuits. Suddenly, though, everyone noticed a problem. One of the puppies seemed to be missing!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-antoinette-puppies-playing

Image copyright Christian Robinson, text copyright Kelly DiPucchio. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

The little ones lined up to be counted. There were Rocky, Ricky, Antoinette, Fi-Fi, Foo-Foo, and Gaston—but no Ooh-La-La! Mrs. Poodle was frantic, but Mrs. Bulldog reassured her. “‘We will find her!’ she insisted.” Clever Rocky followed some footprints he found in the mud, but they did not lead to Ooh-La-La. Ricky ran around the lake, but only found a family of ducks. With his super strength, Bruno checked under boulders, but Ooh-La-La was not hiding under any of them.

“In that moment Antoinette felt a tug in her heart and a twitch in her nose.” She followed the scent from sidewalk cafes to street vendors to sign posts. She hurried past “buggies and bicycles and broomsticks.” Nothing could deter her. Her nose led her to the Louvre, where Antoinette barked excitedly, but the guard would not let her through the door. In a dizzying dash, she wound round and around the guard, skirted past him, and sprinted into the museum.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-antoinette-woman-feeding-birds

Image copyright Christian Robinson, text copyright Kelly DiPucchio. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Antoinette scurried passed the crowds admiring the art and leaped to the top of a tall sculpture just in time “to save Ooh-La-La from a perilous fall” as she chased a butterfly. Mrs. Poodle was overwhelmed with gratitude. Mrs. Bulldog beamed with pride at her brave daughter, and the two shared a knowing look. Gaston looked on with a special smile of his own.

That is a story from long ago. Today, Antoinette and Gaston are raising a family of their own, and Antoinette is “one of the most famous police dogs ever to patrol the streets of Paris.” If you’d like, you can visit her statue in the park!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-antoinette-artist

Image copyright Christian Robinson, text copyright Kelly DiPucchio. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Antoinette gets her own adventure and discovers her special talent in Kelly DiPucchio’s sequel to Gaston. With three bounding brothers, Antoinette feels a little lost in the shuffle, wondering when she’ll discover what she’s good at. Young readers with precocious siblings or friends will empathize with Antoinette’s feelings and be bolstered by her shining moment, which demonstrates that abilities often appear at the most unexpected—and crucial—times. The delightful ending provides a clever and satisfying answer to the story’s main question.

Christian Robinson’s jaunty illustrations of Antoinette and her brothers and friends will cheer fans of Gaston and enchant new readers. Kids will love following the bouncy puppies through the park, where an artist paints the fountain, a woman feeds the pigeons, and a man creates enormous bubbles to float in the air. As Antoinette races through Paris to find Ooh-La-La, readers can track her from page to page through the charming streets and finally to the Louve. Robinson’s soothing, muted blues, greens, and browns lend sophistication to this sweet blended family tale.

Antoinette is an adorable story that is sure to become a favorite of little ones. On its own or paired with Gaston, Antoinette would make a wonderful addition to home bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Atheneum Books for Young Readers, Simon & Schuster, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481457835

Discover more about Kelly DiPucchio and her books on her website!

Check out Christian Robinson’s books and learn more about him and his artwork on his website!

Eiffel Tower Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-eiffel-tower-coloring-page

Eiffel Tower Over Paris Coloring Page

 

Paris is a gorgeous city, full of color and light. Grab your pencils, markers, or crayons and enjoy this printable Eiffel Tower Over Paris Coloring Page.

Picture Book Review