September 23 – It’s National Dog Week

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cat-and-dog-a-tale-of-opposites-cover

About the Holiday

National Dog Week was instituted by Captain William Lewis Judy, founder of Dog World magazine, In 1928. Captain Judy wanted to celebrate the joy and companionship we get from our pups while also reminding people of what it takes to be a responsible dog owner. As members of the family, puppies and older dogs deserve as much love, care, and respect as their humans. To celebrate this week, take your dog for an extra walk or two, get (or make) them a new toy, and don’t forget to give them an extra treat. 

Thanks to Red Comet Press and Blue Slip Media for sending me a copy of Cat & Dog: A Tale of Opposites for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Cat & Dog: A Tale of Opposites

By Tullio Corda

 

How do you make the ups and downs of learning opposites more exciting for both little ones and their grown-ups? What could be more fun than spending a little time with two natural “opposites”—like a cat and a dog? In his madcap romp, Tullio Corda lets you do just that with a couple of adorable pets. As the story opens, an “awake” cat seems to consider the dog who’s “asleep” on his mat. Could this be Cat’s opportunity to be “brave?” She decides yes. Cat leaps and grabs Dog, who, startled awake, is “afraid.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cat-and-dog-a-tale-of-opposites-brave

Copyright Tullio Corda, 2021, courtesy of Red Comet Press.

The chase is on! Cat jumps on a shelf and peeks out from behind a flower pot while Dog searches for her. Oops! Now Dog is wearing the flower pot. Does Cat care? Not so much. Dog gets to go “outside” while Cat can only envy him from her perch “inside” on the windowsill. Cat goes to the “closed” door and waits. With Mom’s help, it’s soon “open.”

There are so many birds for Dog and Cat to run after together. Look! There’s one “up high” on a branch. But Cat and Dog are “down low.” Cat knows just what to do. She climbs up and up and onto the branch. She creeps closer . . . and . . . closer . . .. Oops! That branch can’t hold Cat! “Phew!” thinks Bird.

Fortunately, Dog is there to give Cat a “soft” landing. But part of the branch follows and falls on Cat’s “hard” head. Dog is having fun with the stick, but Cat is feeling down. They tussle in the leaves on the ground. Are they “enemies?” or “friends?”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cat-and-dog-a-tale-of-opposites-inside

Copyright Tullio Corda, 2021, courtesy of Red Comet Press.

Preschoolers and kindergarteners will be charmed by this dynamic duo who like to get up to shenanigans both inside and outside. While Dog and Cat chase and play in the yard, little ones learn common opposite words as well as a few pairs that will stretch their vocabulary. Tullio Cardo’s lively illustrations include plenty of spatial and emotional visual clues to help new learners guess at and understand the concepts.

Cardo also uses a variety of perspectives to introduce kids to a variety of special relationships. For children just learning to read, the bold typography facilitates sight reading and will inspire a sense of confidence in their skills and achievements. Cordo’s slapstick humor is sure to prompt lots of giggles along the way, and the sweet ending highlights the idea that opposites often make the best friends.

An engaging and entertaining story that transcends its concept book roots, Cat & Dog: A Tale of Opposites will grow with kids as they transition from adult read alouds to reading on their own. The book is a top choice for home, classroom, and public library bookshelves.

Ages 3 – 6

Red Comet Press, 2021 | ISBN 978-1636550022

Discover more about Tullio Corda, his books, and his art on his website. You can learn about how Tullio Cardo brought Cat and Dog to life in this interview in which he talks about and demonstrates his art process.

National Dog Week Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-paw-print-magnet-smaller

Paw Print Magnet

 

Whether you have a dog or a cat, a print of your pet’s paw makes a cute magnet for your fridge or locker to give you a paw . . . I mean hand . . . holding those important messages and pictures. Here’s how to do this easy craft with your pet.

Supplies

  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup salt
  • 1/4 cup water
  • Cookie cutter (optional)
  • Bowl
  • Wax paper
  • Strong multi-surface glue or hot glue gun
  • Strong magnet, available at craft stores
  • Paint (optional)

Directions

  1. Mix the flour and salt in the bowl
  2. Slowly add the water and mix the dough, kneading it until it is smooth and soft. Add more water if necessary.
  3. Roll out the dough until it is about 1/4 – 1/2 inch thick
  4. Place the dough on the wax paper
  5. Carefully press your pet’s paw into the dough. 
  6. Place the cookie cutter over the print and cut out or shape the dough by hand
  7. Bake the paw print at 250 degrees for 1 to 2 hours depending on thickness of dough
  8. If desired, paint the print, the background, or both
  9. Attach the magnet with the glue

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cat-and-dog-a-tale-of-opposites-cover

You can find Cat & Dog: A Tale of Opposites at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

August 26 – International Dog Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pug-&-pig-and-friends-cover

About the Holiday

In 2004 Colleen Paige established International Dog Day to remind people – especially those who may be looking for a new pet – of all the dogs in shelters that need forever homes. The day also celebrates dogs of all breeds and honors the work of these faithful friends, whether they are family pets or specially trained as service dogs, police dogs, or search-and-rescue dogs. If you’re thinking of adding a new family member of the furry kind, or if you’d just like to make a difference to animals in shelter care, call or visit your local humane society or other shelter.

Thanks go to Beach Lane Books and Blue Slip Media for sending me a copy of Pug & Pig and Friends for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Pug & Pig and Friends

Written by Sue Lowell Gallion | Illustrated by Joyce Wan

 

Whether fans of Pug and Pig or new readers, kids will be delighted with the invitation to spend time with Pug, Pig, Squirrel, Robin, and Cat at their trim blue-and-white home. These friends like to play together, but not all of them have the same idea of what fun is.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pug-&-pig-and-friends-house

Image copyright Joyce Wan, 2021, text copyright Sue Lowell Gallion, 2021. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

While Pug, Pig, Squirrel, and Robin “like to explore in the bushes,” Cat “watches from the fence.” Pug, Pig, Squirrel, and Robin like to chase each other around the yard. “But not Cat. She watches from the porch. What does Cat like to do?” Cat thinks surprises are fun. She likes to sneak up on Pug, especially when he’s snoozing. With a loud “MRROW!” Cat startles Pug and makes him jump. Then Cat and Pig laugh. But Pug, Squirrel, and Robin do not. “They do not like surprises at all.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pug-&-pig-and-friends-fence

Image copyright Joyce Wan, 2021, text copyright Sue Lowell Gallion, 2021. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Suddenly, the sky grows dark and rain begins to fall. Pug and Pig run to their little house, while Squirrel and Robin scurry to their nests. But where can Cat go? Thunder rumbles and lightning flashes. Cat quickly climbs into the tree and holds on tight. When the rain turns to sprinkles, Robin, Squirrel, and Pig try to get Cat to come down, but she’s too afraid. “Pug has an idea.”

Pug curls up on the welcome mat and closes his eyes. Cat sees him and has an idea of her own. She climbs down from the tree and sneaks up to the front porch. Suddenly, there’s a sound. But who surprises who? And who gets the giggles afterward?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pug-&-pig-and-friends-chase

Image copyright Joyce Wan, 2021, text copyright Sue Lowell Gallion, 2021. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Kids are sure to want to giggle along with Sue Lowell Gallion’s latest Pug & Pig story again and again as surprises abound and these fast friends care for each other despite their small differences. Gallion’s gentle reminder that not all kids like surprises becomes a clever plot twist when Pug helps Cat while showing her that he can enjoy her favorite game too.

With her adorable, brightly colored illustrations, Joyce Wan once again brings to life Gallion’s story in ways that are both familiar and fresh and will enchant little ones. The sweetly smiling faces of the characters and their sheer joy of playing together is captivating and will put a smile on the faces of kids and adults. As the sky turns from blue to rainy gray, kids will love getting caught up in the excitement as the friends make their mad dash for cover. As the sun returns so do the shenanigans and the belly laughs.

Whether you’re adding to your collection of the Pug & Pig series or just getting started, the charming Pug & Pig and Friends is a must for home, classroom, and public library bookshelves.

Ages Baby – 8

Beach Lane Books, 2021 | ISBN 978-1534463004

You can read a fun interview with Sue, Joyce, Pug, and Pig here.

Discover more about Sue Lowell Gallion and her books on her website.

To learn more about Joyce Wan, her books, and her art, visit her website.

International Dog Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pug-&-pig-and-friends-activity-image

Pug & Pig and Friends Activity Kit

 

Kids can have lots of fun with Pug, Pig, Squirrel, Robin, and Cat with the puppets, puzzles, and craft in this printable Activity Kit found on Sue Lowell Gallion’s website! You’ll also find Activity Kits for Pug Meets Pig and Pug & Pig Trick-or-Treat plus extra coloring pages!

Pug & Pig and Friends Activity Kit 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pug-&-pig-and-friends-cover

You can find Pug & Pig and Friends at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

July 30 – Talk in an Elevator Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-going-up-cover

About the Holiday

There are many moments in life when the opportunity arises to make a connection with someone you don’t know – even if only fleetingly. Today’s holiday highlights one of these – a ride in an elevator. Instead of standing quietly until you reach your floor, the founders of Talk in an Elevator Day wanted to encourage people to strike up a conversation, maybe lighten the day with a joke, or just say hi! whether their traveling companions are a friend, neighbor, or stranger. The community in today’s book certainly celebrates the spirit of today’s holiday!

Going Up!

Written by Sherry J. Lee | Illustrated by Charlene Chua

 

Sophie and her dad, Leonard, have been invited to Olive’s birthday party on the tenth floor of their apartment building. She and her dad bake their favorite cookies to bring—”molasses with jam in the middle. It’s my grandma’s recipe,” Sophie says. Sophie and her dad live on the first floor, so just before 2:00, they head for the elevator, where Sophie pushes the button to go up.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-going-up-first-invitation

Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2020, text copyright Sherry J. Lee, 2020. Courtesy of Kids Can Press.

The elevator stops at the second floor, and when the door opens, “the Santucci brothers, Andrew and Pippo”—two biker dudes—get on. “‘Hey, Little Bit!’” Pippo says to Sophie. On the third floor, a couple and their dog, Norman, get on, along with a “Happy Birthday” balloon. On the fourth floor, Mr. and Mrs. Habib and their grandkids, Yasmin and Jamal, are waiting with a “big bowl of gulab jamun” which they made especially for Sophie and her dad.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-going-up-first-kitchen

Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2020, text copyright Sherry J. Lee, 2020. Courtesy of Kids Can Press.

Things are getting pretty tight in the elevator by the time it reaches the fifth floor, so Leonard puts Sophie on his shoulders and Sophie holds the cookies on her head like a hat. The elevator door opens at the eighth floor to find Grace and Arnie standing there with a bass and a clarinet. Can they fit too? With a squeeze or two, they juuust make it. One more floor to go…. Will anyone else fit?

At last, the elevator reaches the tenth floor, and with a DING everyone runs, cartwheels, dances, and tumbles out—all to wish Olive a Happy Birthday. And who is Olive? Take the elevator up to see!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-going-up-first-floor

Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2020, text copyright Sherry J. Lee, 2020. Courtesy of Kids Can Press.

Sherry J. Lee’s warm and welcoming story of a group of diverse neighbors getting together to celebrate the birthday of one of their favorite tenants will delight kids. With the thrill of riding a real elevator, readers will eagerly await the door’s opening on every floor, where they’re introduced to a new family or individual. Told from Sophie’s point of view and rich in dialogue, the story shines with inclusiveness as the neighbors greet each other enthusiastically.

Humor and suspense builds as the elevator stops on each floor and more and more people bringing food, instruments, pets, and housewarming gifts squeeze into the tiny space. The elevator provides a natural setting for fun math and observational engagement, and kids will love flipping back through the pages to count, add, talk about spatial relationships, and notice hints about the favorite talents and activities of each neighbor.

With her colored pencil-and-watercolor illustrations, Charlene Chua creates a vibrant apartment building community that works in perfect synchronicity with Lee’s story. Images of the diverse neighbors—from Black Sophie and Leonard to two supposed tough guys (who sport cat tattoos and carry the tiniest of kittens) to a same-sex couple and a South Asian family to Oliver’s owner, who uses a wheelchair—reflect readers’ urban, suburban, and rural experiences.

On the journey from the first floor to the tenth, Chua includes a cornucopia of humorous, sweet, and “oh no!” clues that define personalities, add to the suspense, and hint at the identity of the birthday girl. The pull-out page as everyone tumbles out of the elevator is a showstopper that will have readers of all ages pointing, giggling, and appreciating all the residents of this special home. Opportunities to visualize and discuss math concepts occur with each push of the button or turn of the page. After taking this trip, kids will eagerly look for and welcome the diversity and individuality in their own neighborhoods.

Clever, sweet, and organically inclusive, Going Up! is a book kids will want to read again and again. As a charming story on its own and with so many applications for discussion and cross-curricular activities, the book is a must for home, classroom, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 7

Kids Can Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1525301131

Discover more about Sherry J. Lee and her books as well as a fun Going Up! Activity Kit on her website.

To learn more about Charlene Chua, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Talk in an Elevator Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bake-up-some-fun-word-search

Bake up Some Fun! Word Search Puzzle

 

Any party is more fun with lots of treats! Can you find your favorite in this baking pan puzzle?

Bake up Some Fun! Word Search PuzzleBake up Some Fun! Word Search Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-going-up-cover

You can find Going Up! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

July 11 – All American Pet Photo Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s holiday probably needs no special promotion since sharing pictures of our singular pets with our friends, coworkers, and family is something all many of us pet owners do every day, whether it’s on social media or just scrolling through pics of our pet’s latest antics on our phone. Our pets are just so cute and funny and clever that it’s hard not to show everyone. To celebrate today, capture your pet doing something extraordinary—or ordinary, it doesn’t really matter—and share them for your family, friends, and the world to see!

Thanks to Sleeping Bear Press for sending me a copy of Tails from the Animal Shelter for review consideration. All opinions about the book are my own.

Tails from the Animal Shelter

Written by Stephanie Shaw | Illustrated by Liza Woodruff

 

Welcome to the Humane Society Animal Shelter! The animals are waiting to meet you, and the staff are happy to introduce you to the wonderful animals who are available for adoption. While most animals who arrive at shelters across the country are dogs or cats, there are lots of other pets looking for a new home. Why do some animals come to live in a shelter? The book reveals many reasons. Among them are that “some of the animals are strays; some are rescued from natural disasters” and “some have been given up for adoption because their owners can no longer care for them.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-shelter

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Are you ready to find a new friend? If it’s a puppy you’re looking for, you’ll love Tinkle, who’s so excited to see you that he “cannot help but piddle.” But it’s okay. “Happy puppies always dribble….As time passes and pups grow, / This little guy won’t pee ‘hello.’” If you don’t know what type of dog is best for your family, the staff at the shelter can help match you to the perfect one.

Cats also make wonderful pets for many reasons. Whether you like long-haired or short-haired, large or small cats, you’ll find just the right fit for your family at the shelter. Not ready for a long-term commitment? You can look into fostering a newborn kitten to get them ready for adoption. What kinds of kittens will you find? All sorts, like Ariel, who says: “I’m an acrobat cat! / I can climb anywhere! / I’ll roll in a ball and then / leap to a chair!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-skunks

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

These dogs and puppies, cats and kittens are only a few of the animals that turn up needing a new home. Take Pooter, for example. Pooter is black and white and, despite the recognizable stripe down its back, does not stink. Skunks that make their way to shelters “have never lived in the wild” and have had surgery so they cannot make their “smelly spray.”

Veterinary advances have improved the lives of injured animals or animals with health problems. Animals with special needs can now be fitted with “rear-support leashes or wheelchairs” and “can live happily for many years.” If you can adopt “an animal with special needs [you] will bring a grateful and loyal pet into your family.” A popular pet that has some surprising talents, a rabbit can also be a top choice for people who live in a smaller home. Trained to use a litter box, rabbits “can live indoors just like cats do.” 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-special-needs-pets

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

If you live on a farm or have a lot of land in an area that allows for farm animals, you may be interested in Hamlet, who tells readers, “I am a sweet potbellied pig. / I started small but I grew BIG….I know some tricks. I’m neat and clean. / I’m many things. I’m just not… / lean.” Around the nation there are many “pigs, goats, sheep, and chickens [that] need new homes. There are over two hundred thousand horses alone rescued or surrendered to shelter care every year.” 

Along with detailed descriptions of the birds, reptiles, and senior animals that also make loving pets, the book is packed with information about how and why certain animals come to shelters and programs that sponsor a variety of animals and help get them ready for adoption. Back matter reveals how animal shelters were established, gives extensive tips on and issues to consider when adopting a shelter animal, lists ways people can help shelter animals even if they can’t adopt, and provides online resources for learning more and finding shelters in your area.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-rabbits

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

In her fascinating and accessible text, Stephanie Shaw combines poetry with facts and interesting tidbits about each type of animal to discuss why they make excellent pets for the right person or living condition. Her humorous, whimsical verses that accompany each category and introduce a particular animal will charm kids with a snapshot of the animal’s personality. Kids will also enjoy talking about how each name fits the animal.

Liza Woodruff’s cheery illustrations will enchant animal lovers with adorable images of funny, loving, and endearing animals happy to find a forever home. The joy that pets bring to a family is evident as kids hug, play with, and react to their pets.

An excellent introduction to shelter animals and pet ownership, Tails from the Animal Shelter is highly recommended for any family thinking about adopting a pet as well as for young animal lovers and kids interested in veterinary medicine or volunteering to help animals. The book would also make a favorite addition to school and public library collections.

Ages 5 – 8

Sleeping Bear Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1534110489

Discover more about Stephanie Shaw and her books on her website.

To learn more about Liza Woodruff, her books, and her art, visit her website.

All American Pet Photo Day Activity

CPB - Pig Day pigs

Roly Poly Spool Potbellied Pig and Piglets

 

Get ready to have fun making this cute and easy craft! Ham it up with your own pig and piglets who can keep you company on your desk, near your bed or anywhere it’s fun to play!

Supplies

  • Printable Pigs Ears Template
  • 2 ½-inch wooden spoon, available from craft stores
  • 1-inch wooden spool, available from craft stores
  • Pink yarn, I used a wide-strand yarn
  • Pink fleece or felt
  • Pink craft paint
  • Pink 5/8-inch or 1-inch flat button with two holes
  • Pink 3/8-inch flat button with two holes
  • Paint brush
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Black marker

CPB - Pig Day with spools (2)

Directions

  1. Print Pigs Ears Template
  2. Trace the ears onto the fleece or felt and cut them out.
  3. Paint the spool with the pink paint
  4. Let spool dry
  5. When the spool is dry, glue the ears to the spool, letting the ears stick up over the rim of the spool.
  6. Wrap yarn in straight layers around spool until the body of the pig is a little bigger than the end of the spool, which will be the face
  7. Cut yarn off skein and glue the end to the body
  8. To make the nose, glue the button over the hole in the middle of the spool
  9. Mark the eyes and mouth with a marker
  10. To make the tail for the large pig, cut a 4-inch long piece of yarn. Tie a triple knot in the yarn (or a knot big enough to fill the hole in the spool). Then tie a single knot near the other end of the yarn. Insert the large knot into the spool’s hole at the back of the pig. Trim the yarn in front of the second knot as needed.
  11. To make the tail for the piglets, tie a single knot in the yarn and another single knot below the first. Insert one of the single knots into the hole. Trim yarn as needed.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-cover

You can find Tails from the Animal Shelter at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 21 – National Dog Party Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-woof!-the-truth-about-dogs-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s fun holiday reminds dog moms and dads that people aren’t the only ones who like to party – dogs do too! Throwing a party for your pooch and their best buds with toys, games, treats, and all the trimmings is a perfect way to spend a summer day. For more information and tips on how to plan a successful party, visit dogtime.com.

WOOF! The Truth About Dogs

By Annette Whipple

 

If you love dogs, you can probably recognize different breeds just by their tail…or snout… or, maybe even by their bark. You probably won’t be surprised to learn that “dogs are the most popular pet in the world,” but why is that? Readers are about to find out with Annette Whipple’s WOOF!, which includes adorable photographs and answers to lots of questions you might have about dogs. Where does she begin? With puppies, of course! If you’ve ever seen a newborn puppy, you probably noticed three things right away: they are tiny, they have a unique, unforgettable sweet puppy smell, and they keep their eyes closed—for a long time. Why? Incredibly, “a puppy and its siblings grow for just two months in their mother’s womb. That’s fast—too fast to fully develop.” Whipple explains all the things newborn puppies can’t do and how their mom’s help them.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-woof!-the-truth-about-dogs-puppies

Copyright Annette Whipple, 2021, courtesy of Reycraft Books.

You know that when a dog wags his tail, it means it’s happy. But do dogs experience other feelings? Whipple says, Yes! With text and photographs, she describes a dog’s various emotions and shows readers how they exhibit and communicate them to their humans. Dogs help their humans learn about them, but how do dogs learn about their humans and other parts of their world? Dogs are master sniffers! “Dogs smell thousands—possible millions—of times better than humans.” How is this possible? Whipple shows what goes on inside a dog’s snout and tells readers why they—and unfamiliar dogs—always undergo a sniff test.

Having a dog as a pet is lots of fun, and they bring comfort and companionship too. But dogs can also help people in a myriad of ways from herding sheep and cows on a ranch to assisting police officers and soldiers to living with someone as a service dog to provide daily needs and keep them safe and healthy. Whipple reveals fascinating details about these special dogs and includes photographs of dogs at work. Think some dogs look like wolves? Whipple states that “scientists know dogs descend from wolves,” but goes on to relate all the ways—some of which are astounding—that dogs and wolves differ.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-woof!-the-truth-about-dogs-feelings

Copyright Annette Whipple, 2021, courtesy of Reycraft Books.

Whipple reveals ways that kids can help their canine friends at home or by volunteering at or fundraising for a local animal shelter. She also shows readers how to meet a dog as well as important actions to not take when greeting a dog. Interested in knowing which dog is the largest, tallest, smallest, fastest, hairiest, and not so hairy? That’s all hear too. And any dog lover likes nothing more than playing with their pet. Whipple includes instructions for making a tug toy out of recycled material that will make kids happy and keep their dogs wagging their tail.

Sidebars illustrated by Juanbjuan Oliver reveal more intriguing facts about dogs throughout the book. Backmatter includes a glossary of words found in the text as well as Internet resources from further learning.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-woof!-the-truth-about-dogs-communicate

Copyright Annette Whipple, 2021, courtesy of Reycraft Books.

Annette Whipple’s engaging and informative text educates readers—whether they are already dog owners, considering getting a pet, or just want to know how to interact with dogs they meet—on the health and behaviors of these beloved animals. Her straightforward delivery backed up by excellent photographs of a wide range of breeds will appeal to kids. Children who may love dogs but for some reason can’t have one at home, will want to check out Whipple’s discussion of various ways kids can volunteer to help dogs.

Visually striking and filled with information that’s sure to surprise, impress, and educate kids about dogs, WOOF! The Truth About Dogs would make an excellent choice for new or prospective dog owners at home and as an addition to school and public library collections.

Ages 6 – 11

Reycraft Books, 2021 | ISBN 978-1478873808

Discover more about Annette Whipple and her books on her website.

National Dog Party Day Activity

CPB - Dog Biscuits

Homemade Dog Biscuits

 

These homemade dog biscuits are fun to make and a special treat for your dog at home, a neighbor’s pet, or dogs waiting for forever homes at your local shelter. 

*Children should have adult supervision when using the oven.

Supplies

  • 1 large bowl
  • Large spoon or whisk
  • Cookie cutters – shaped like traditional dog bones or any favorite shape

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup powdered milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup water
  • 1/3 cup margarine or butter, melted
  • 1 egg beaten

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees
  2. Add buckwheat flour to bowl
  3. Add powdered milk to bowl
  4. Add salt to bowl
  5. Stir to mix dry ingredients
  6. Add water
  7. Add melted margarine or butter
  8. Add egg
  9. Stir until liquid is absorbed
  10. Knead for a few minutes to form a dough
  11. If the dough is too dry, add a little more water, one Tablespoon at a time
  12. Place the dough on a board
  13. Roll dough to ½ inch thickness
  14. Cut into shapes with cookie cutters
  15. Bake at 325 degrees for 35 minutes
  16. Biscuits will be hard when cool.

Makes about 40 biscuits.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-woof!-the-truth-about-dogs-cover

You can find WOOF! The Truth About Dogs at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

May 31 – Memorial Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-cover

Memorial Day is observed each year on the last Monday of May to honor all members of the military who lost their lives in the service of their country, especially in battle. Begun after the Civil War, the holiday expanded after World War II to remember those who died in all American wars. Memorial Day was made a national holiday by an act of Congress in 1971. 

Anna & Natalie

Written by Barbara H. Cole | Illustrated by Ronald Himler

Every year Mrs. Randall’s third-grade class attends the Wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery. What’s more every year four students are chosen from her class to carry the wreath. This year everyone wonders who those lucky four will be. Students who want to be in the running to be selected, Mrs. Randall, says, must write a letter telling her why they should be chosen. Hearing that, Freddie and Tommy drop out immediately while Nancy says her letter will be the best.

Anna dreams of being chosen too, but experience tells her she will not. She’s never chosen for the basketball or softball team, the cheerleading squad, or the lines of Red Rover. “Sure, someone always chose her for the spelling team, but the others—the fun ones—never.” But this time seems different. All day—even though Mrs. Randall’s eagle eyes catch it—Anna daydreams and makes plans. When the bus drops her and her sister off, they hurry home to start work.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-school-bus

Image copyright Ronald Himler, text copyright Barbara H. Cole. Courtesy of Star Bright Books

There Anna makes a secret call to her grandpa and then she and Natalie go to the front porch, and while Nat naps on the swing Anna pulls out her computer and begins writing her letter to Mrs. Randall. The next day Mrs. Randall collects the letters with the promise to choose the team by tomorrow and a reminder for those who will not be picked: “‘Remember,’” she says, “‘it certainly is an honor to be on the team, but it is also an honor to visit the Tomb.’” Then “they talked about Washington and the monuments and the Capitol and the White House, but especially they talked about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the Changing of the Guard.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-on-the-porch

Image copyright Ronald Himler, text copyright Barbara H. Cole. Courtesy of Star Bright Books

At school the next day, Mrs. Randall says that while she received four excellent letters, one stood out. She begins to read it to the class: “‘I want to be on the team, not for myself, but for many others who have not been honored or remembered….They worked long and hard and saved many lives….And sometimes they were heroes bigger than the strongest men around. Sometimes they carried medicine and food to dangerous places to save the wounded soldiers. My own great-great-grandfather was in this special service and saved lives. I would like to be on the team to say thank you to those forgotten heroes of World War II. Yours truly…’ Mrs. Randall’s voice cracked and choked, and then she read, ‘From Natalie (with help from Anna)’”

The class starts whooping and cheering, but Mrs. Randall interrupts their celebration to read one more line: “P.S.—Would you please let Anna walk with me so I will not be alone and she won’t be either?” The class begins chanting “Yeah, Anna! Yeah, Anna!,” and Anna can’t believe that her dream of being on the team has come true. When Anna gets home from school and tells her family, they proudly make plans to travel with their “two girls” to the ceremony.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-anna-and-natalie

Image copyright Ronald Himler, text copyright Barbara H. Cole. Courtesy of Star Bright Books

Finally, the day of the Wreath-Laying Ceremony arrives. The students are dressed in their best clothes, and as the four team members prepare to accept the wreath, “Natalie led the procession down the long marble steps, her black coat glistening and her brass buttons shining like the sun. Anna walked beside her.” As the soldier hands the children the wreath fashioned from “dogwood flowers, magnolias, and decorative red birds,” he loudly announces, “The students of Willow Run School and Natalie, a seeing-eye dog, will lay this wreath to honor the men who served in World War II and the dogs who helped them. ATTENTION!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-tomb-of-the-unknowns

Image copyright Ronald Himler, text copyright Barbara H. Cole. Courtesy of Star Bright Books

The clear notes of Taps rang across Arlington National Cemetery as Anna and the three other children lay the wreath in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Afterward, Anna’s grandfather and parents took pictures of Anna and Natalie to remember “this shining moment of Anna, and of Natalie, who saw the world that Anna could not see.”

An Author’s Note revealing the use of dogs during wartime—from ancient history to today—follows the text.

Barbara H. Cole’s story of Anna and Natalie is compelling in many ways. First, it presents a look at what Memorial Day means to children from their point of view. Second, the story honors not only the brave soldiers who protect our country but also the canine corps which has served our military from our country’s earliest history. Third, in Anna, Cole has created a character who is part of a military family through her grandfather and also has a personal connection to service dogs through Natalie, her seeing-eye dog, whose great-great-grandfather served in the canine corps. The portrayal of Anna as a child with a disability who is an excellent writer, enthusiastic about her dreams, and a good friend is poignant and inclusive. Cole’s straightforward narration of a school day and the announcement of a special assignment—complete with asides from students—as well as Anna’s family life depicts an environment that will be familiar to readers and carries the story in a natural arc.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-classroom

Image copyright Ronald Himler, text copyright Barbara H. Cole. Courtesy of Star Bright Books

Ronald Himler’s realistic illustrations of Anna’s Willow Run School, her home, and Arlington Cemetery beautifully represent this moving story. His pages are full of diverse, real kids, smiling, laughing, getting off the school bus, enjoying a family dinner, and solemnly performing their job at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. A hint to Natalie’s true identity is subtly inserted into various scenes, making the final reveal a satisfying moment.

Anna & Natalie is a wonderful choice for all kids observing Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and other patriotic holidays.

Ages 5 – 10

Star Bright Books, 2010 | ISBN 978-1595722119

To learn more about Anna & Natalie and download a Curriculum Guide, visit Star Bright Books!

Discover more about about Ronald Himler and view a gallery of his work, visit his website!

Memorial Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-memorial-day-word-scramble

Memorial Day Word Scramble

Unscramble the words associated with today’s holiday and discover a secret message! Print your Memorial Day Word Scramble here!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-anna-and-natalie-cover

You can find Anna & Natalie at these booksellers

Amazon | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 17 – Get Caught Reading Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-hudson-and-tallulah-take-sides-cover

About the Holiday

The Get Caught Reading campaign was initiated in 1999 by the Association of American Publishers with the idea to promote literacy and language development through reading to children and encouraging them to read on their own. As part of the campaign, posters of celebrities, dignitaries, and even fictional characters enjoying a book are available for schools, libraries, and other organizations to hang where kids will see them. The excitement of reading also takes over social media all month long, which this year is more important than ever. To celebrate this holiday, make sure you stock up on new and favorite books or download ebooks or audiobooks from your library and get caught reading! Learn more by visiting the Get Caught Reading website and the Every Child a Reader website.

Thanks to Two Lions and Blue Slip Media for sharing a copy of Hudson and Tallulah Take Sides for review consideration. All opinions are my own.

Hudson and Tallulah Take Sides

Written by Anna Kang | Illustrated by Christopher Weyant

 

Hudson, a lovable, shaggy mutt, and Tallulah, an orange tabby lived on opposite sides of a fence in their tidy neighborhood. Tallulah was just about to sneak up on a bird singing atop the fence when Hudson went “BARK! BARK! BARK! BARK! BARK! BARK! BARK! BARK! BARK!” Tallulah took a last-ditch leap, but the bird—warned—flew away just in time. Tallulah fumed. “Hudson.” 

Tiptoeing along the fence top, Tallulah saw Hudson digging a hole underneath the fence on the other side of his yard. “I’m busting out,” Hudson told Tallulah. He felt fences kept him trapped. Tallulah thought fences kept them safe. Still, Tallulah followed Hudson down the street. Behind the café, Hudson found breakfast in the trash can. Tallulah thought it was disgusting.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-hudson-and-tallulah-take-sides-fence

Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2021, text copyright Anna Kang, 2021. Courtesy of Two Lions.

She was much more interested in the butterfly flitting here and there, there and here, and right into Hudson’s open, yawning mouth. Tallulah pounced, out spit the butterfly. Now it was Tallulah’s turn to lead. When they passed the dog park, Hudson headed in to play with his friends, while Tallulah waited. When the other dogs saw her, they went nuts. “CAT! BARK! CAT!!! CAT!! BARK! BARK! BARK! CAT!” Tallulah thought dogs were ridiculous.

Hudson and Tallulah had different opinions about mud, a squirt from the hose, and Dave the mail carrier. To Tallulah Dave was a friend; to Hudson he was an enemy. “You’re MY enemy,” Tallulah said. They continued on, but on opposite sides of the street, until… they came to a big puddle full of birds. Tallulah leaped, Hudson bounded. They splashed and ran in circles chasing the birds. When they reached the other side of the puddle at the same time, they looked at each other and smiled. They sat side by side and watched the birds scatter across the sky. Now they find lots of things they like to do together, and their home’s fences can’t keep them apart, but they still enjoy a little friendly competition: “You’re on my side,” Tallulah tells Hudson. But Hudson counters, “You’re on mine.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-hudson-and-tallulah-take-sides-butterfly

Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2021, text copyright Anna Kang, 2021. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Anna Wang and Christopher Weyant work in perfect tandem in showing kids that even polar opposites that argue like cats and dogs can find areas of agreement and even have fun together. This gentle lesson in giving other people a chance will make kids giggle as Hudson and Tallulah’s clash over what is safe, delicious, worth chasing, and cleanliness comes to a head over Tallulah’s love for the mail carrier. Wang’s story is told entirely through dialogue between Hudson and Tallulah that makes it easy for kids to understand their quarrels.

Along the way, Weyant’s bright cartoon drawings depict the differences between Tallulah and Hudson with humor and personality. Where Hudson is quick and loud, Tallulah is sneaky and quiet. Hudson can’t wait to get under the fence; Tallulah relies on it. Hudson is messy; Tallulah is neat. The characters’ wry facial expressions will make kids laugh. When the two come upon the puddle full of birds, the wordless two-page spread, lets readers predict what’s going to happen. Hudson and Tallulah’s separate, but identical, reaction is playful, encouraging, and the kind of bonding experience that can lead to friendship—whether animal or human.

A story short enough to engage youngest readers who may be making their first forays into making friends, but thoughtful enough for older kids who may have hit a snag in making or keeping a friend, Hudson and Tallulah Take Sides is a charming choice for home and classroom story times as well as public library collections.

Ages 3 – 7

Two Lions, 2021 | ISBN 978-1542006682

Anna Kang and Christopher Weyant are the creators of Theodor Seuss Geisel Award winner You Are (Not) Small as well as series titles That’s (Not) Mine, I Am (Not) Scared, and We Are (Not) Friends. They also wrote and illustrated Eraser, Can I Tell You a Secret?, and Will You Help Me Fall Asleep? Christopher’s work can also be seen in The New Yorker, and his cartoons are syndicated worldwide. This husband-and-wife team lives in New Jersey with their two daughters and their rescue dog, Hudson, the inspiration behind the character in this book. Visit them at www.annakang.com and www.christopherweyant.com.

You can connect with Anna on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter 

You’ll find Christopher on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-match-the-kittens-puzzlecelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Peppy-Puppies-Match-Up-Puzzle

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are lots of kittens and puppies to play with in these two printable puzzles!

Match the Kittens Puzzle | Match the Puppies Puzzle

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-hudson-and-tallulah-take-sides-cover

You can find Hudson and Tallulah Take Sides at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review