April 13 – It’s Week of the Young Child

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About the Holiday

2021 marks the 50th anniversary of Week of the Young Child, an annual initiative hosted by the National Association for the Education of Young Children to celebrate learning, young children, their families, and their teachers. Daily themes focus on ways that children learn. These included Music Monday, Tasty Tuesday, Work Together Wednesday, Artsy Thursday, and Family Friday, in which people are encouraged to share their family stories. To get more information on this week-long celebration of kids and discover activities to make each day of the week fun, visit the NAEYC website.

Thanks to Lerner Books for sending me a copy of Let’s Go on a Digger, Let’s Go on a Plane, and Let’s Go on a Train for review consideration. All opinions on the books are my own.

Let’s Go! Series

Each of the books in this upbeat series for youngest readers, which also includes Let’s Go on a Rocket, Let’s Go on a Ferry, and Let’s Go on a Tractor introduces kids to some of the methods of transportation they love to see in the outside world and that spark their imaginations. Combining vocabulary that teaches terms associated with each vehicle, realistic visuals, and a story that shows the vehicle in motion, these books are well-rounded and sweet ways to satisfy any child’s love of transportation. Also inherent in each book are depictions of friendship, teamwork, and adventure. Readers will also like recognizing familiar faces, as the same six kids take part in each book. So let’s get going!

Let’s Go on a Digger

Written by Rosalyn Albert | Illustrated by Natalia Moore

 

What little one wouldn’t love to climb into a huge machine and dig in the mud? With this bright and cheery board book, kids take over a construction site. From the cab of the digger, a little girl says, “I’ll make a mountain with the mud / All piled in a heap. / I’ll dig a swimming pool-sized hole: / It will be extra deep.” She tells readers that she uses the joysticks to move the boom and shovel.

Then, when the bucket is all full of dirt, she pushes the “drive rods forward / To make the treads move straight.” While two other young workers dig with a shovel and remove dirt with a wheelbarrow, the girl drives the digger to a dump truck, where she lifts the bucket and pours the dirt into the back of the truck. “‘Hooray!’” she exclaims. She’s had such fun on her digger.

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Image copyright Natalia Moore, 2021, text copyright Rosalyn Albert, 2021. Courtesy of Catch a Star.

Rosalyn Albert’s engaging rhymes are just right for young readers excited about construction vehicles and how they work. Whether on a big scale or small, digging in the mud is a favorite kid activity, and readers will love learning the words for various parts of a digger while seeing it in action.

Natalia Moore’s vibrant yellow digger and enthusiastic kids in their hardhats and safety vests welcome readers to the construction site where a big project is underway. Kids will love Moore’s depictions of the digger scooping and dumping, the joysticks in the cab, and the caterpillar treads that help the big machine move over muddy ground.

Ages Preschool and up

Lerner Books, 2021 | ISBN 978-1913639112

You can find Let’s Go on a Digger at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-let's-go-on-a-plane-cover

Let’s Go on a Plane

Written by Rosalyn Albert | Illustrated by Natalia Moore

 

At a busy airport, a pilot is almost ready to take off. A flight attendant is about to board, and a luggage handler is ready to load the passenger’s suitcases. From the huge windows of the terminal, two kids, eager for their flight, wave at the pilot and she waves back. As the plane takes off into the sky, the passengers think about how small everything on Earth will look from way up high.

“The engines roar, the wheels go up, / My seatbelt’s fastened tight. / I see the huge wings flying / Up, up, up into the night.” In the clear night sky, the kids see the moon closer than they ever have, and stars seem to be twinkling just for them.” When the pilot invites them into the cockpit, the kids are thrilled to watch her fly the plane. Soon, the plane is “gliding to the ground,” and the kids’ vacation is about to begin.

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Image copyright Natalia Moore, 2021, text copyright Rosalyn Albert, 2021. Courtesy of Catch a Star.

If your little one loves planes or is going to be taking a trip, Rosalyn Albert’s story of a night flight will fill them with the wonder and excitement of air travel. From a smooth ascent and landing to the phenomenon of seeing earth from afar to a visit to the cockpit to meet the pilot, Albert includes all the fun of an airplane trip.

Natalia Moore invites kids to the tarmac of a busy airport where planes wait their turn for takeoff while one plane begins to soar over the city. In the cockpit, kids can see the myriad buttons and dials, the radar screen, and the control stick the pilot uses to fly the plane. As the plane approaches its destination, kids may want to take a guess as to where it’s landing.

Ages Preschool and up

Lerner Books, 2021 | ISBN 978-1913639129

You can find Let’s Go on a Plane at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-let's-go-on-a-train-cover

Let’s Go on a Train

Written by Rosalyn Albert | Illustrated by Natalia Moore

 

On Platform 2 of the train station, two kids wait to board their train. The driver even lets them “help to stoke the fire” by shoveling coal into the furnace. As the train takes off down the tracks, the kids pass fields of sheep, travel “in and out of tunnels, / Over mountains high and green, / Through towns with people waving— / It’s such a pleasant scene.” The inspector checks their tickets, and they get tea from the trolley when it comes by. As they watch out the window, the kids tap their feet to the “click-clack” rhythm of the train. At last, “The station is in sight. / It’s been such an adventure— / I’ll have sweet dreams tonight.”

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Image copyright Natalia Moore, 2021, text copyright Rosalyn Albert, 2021. Courtesy of Catch a Star.

From standing on the platform as the powerful train pulls into the station to watching the sights speed by through the windows, Rosalyn Albert’s story of train travel is a thrill. She even includes that favorite response to seeing a train pass by—waving at the passengers. In addition to the sights, Albert also includes the distinctive sounds of train travel, from the whistle to the rhythmic “click-clack” of the wheels. Ending with a nighttime arrival scene, Let’s Go on a Train would make a sweet bedtime read for little train lovers.

Little ones will love Natalia Moore’s big green train and especially getting to see inside where knobs, dials, wheels, and piping control the furnace and the steam that powers the engine. On their long trip the kids see countryside, mountains, and rivers, and they get to partake of a favorite train-trip treat: getting a snack from the trolley or food car. Led by the glow of the lantern out front, the train pulls into the station under a full moon as the little passengers snooze.

Ages Preschool and up

Lerner Books, 2021 | ISBN 978-1913639105

You can find Let’s Go on a Train at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Week of the Young Child Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-plane-coloring-page  Digger, Plane, and Train Coloring Pages

 

Grab your crayons or pencils and enjoy these coloring pages of your favorite vehicles

Digger Coloring Page | Plane Coloring Page | Train Coloring Page

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Picture Book Review

April 12 – D.E.A.R (Drop Everything And Read) Day

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About the Holiday

National D.E.A.R. Day is celebrated every year on April 12th in commemoration of Beverly Cleary’s birthday. D.E.A.R. stands for Drop Everything And Read and encourages families to set aside at least thirty minutes to enjoy reading together. Beverly Cleary, who recently passed away at the age of 104, gave the world such unforgettable characters as Ramona and Beezus Quimby, Henry Huggins and his dog Ribsy, and the motorcycle-riding mouse, Ralph S. Mouse. You can learn more about D.E.A.R. Day and find resources and tips for reading with children on the Reading Rockets website.

Thanks to Lerner Books for sending me a copy of Pirates vs. Monsters for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Pirates vs. Monsters

Written by David Crosby | Illustrated by Lee Cosgrove

 

“Three pirates met up at the old Parrot’s Head, / to brag about monsters they’d each left for dead.” Over a few mugs of frothy grog, while the fog rolled in over the pier, Hector took the stage first. His gold teeth glinted in the light as regaled the others with his tale of besting the Hockler, who could “spit globs of poison straight into your eye.” While the pirates were enjoying deep belly laughs over Hector’s adventure, an eerie ship pulled into port.

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Image copyright Lee Cosgrove, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts/Lerner.

Next up was Pirate Sue. She climbed atop a barrel and told a hair-curling story of defeating the Crunk, “‘…a two-headed beast” who’s heads took turns feasting and sleeping. The three pirates were laughing so hard that they didn’t see three shrouded shapes leave the spooky ship. Finally, it was George’s turn to tell his story. Holding his peg leg aloft, he began. “‘The Muncher,’ he snarled, / ‘bites pirates on sight. / He ate my left leg but did / not get my right.” To beat him, George tricked the Muncher into swallowing an anchor festooned with sharp points all around by dressing it up like a pirate scarecrow.

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Image copyright Lee Cosgrove, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts/Lerner.

The pirates were rolling on the floor in hysterics when a “BANG!” shook the door. The piano player screamed as in burst the Hockler, the Crunk, and the Muncher. The three pirates ran for their lives from the Parrot’s Head. Hector dove off the pier, Sue took off down the pier, and George leaped through the window.

With grog in their claws, “three monsters met up at the old Parrot’s Head, / to brag about pirates they’d faced and had fled.” But who told the truth and who was a liar while telling brave tales in the glow of the fire?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-hockler

Image copyright Lee Cosgrove, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts/Lerner.

David Crosby’s story of three pirates and three monsters who love bragging about their exploits will have kids guffawing along with Hector, Sue, and George as they crack each other up with their tales of daring do. Crosby’s madcap rhymes are a joy to read aloud, especially using dramatic inflection to wring out all the arg-mosphere and suspense of this surprising story.

Lee Cosgrove’s cozy Parrot’s Head, with its crackling fire; wooden barrel tables; swords, swordfish, and skeleton décor; and scruffy piano player is the perfect pier-side hangout for a jovial tankard of grog. Even the dog wears an eyepatch. Images of the pirates and monsters will have kids giggling, and close examinations of the pages reveal plenty of humorous details like the island map on the wall of the Parrot’s Head that looks suspiciously like the “globs of poison” the Hockler spits, the curly hair sprouting from the skull on Sue’s hat that mirrors her own, and George’s heart-print underwear.

A treasure for kids who love pirates, monsters, and a funny story with an unexpected ending, Pirates vs. Monsters makes a fun go-to book for boisterous story times at home, in the classroom, and for public library collections.

Ages 4 – 9

Maverick Arts Publishing/Lerner, 2021 | ISBN 978-1848867086

You can connect with David Crosby on Twitter.

To learn more about Lee Cosgrove, his books, and his art, visit his website.

D.E.A.R Day Activity

CPB - Bookworm Book (2)

Bookworm Bookmark

 

For all you bookworms out there who love to read, here’s your very own Bookworm Bookmark to color and put between the pages of your favorite story!

Supplies

  • Bookworm Bookmark template
  • Heavy stock paper (optional)
  • Colored pencils or markers
  • Scissors

Directions

  1. Print out the Bookworm Bookmark template
  2. Color the bookworm
  3. Cut out the Bookworm
  4. Cut the Bookworm’s mouth at the dotted line. The top part of the bookworm’s mouth hangs over the page and marks your place!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-cover

You can find Pirates vs. Monsters at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

April 9 – It’s National Humor Month

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About the Holiday

During April we celebrate one of the most fantastic things about life—humor! Whether you’re laughing at a funny joke, your favorite comedian, a comic strip, a silly mistake, or even yourself, a chuckle is good for you! Today, take time to relax and enjoy the small absurdities in life—and give a few hearty “Ha ha ha’s!” along the way. Today’s book is a perfect place for you and your kids to start.

Not Now, Cow

Written by Tammi Sauer | Illustrated by Troy Cummings

 

Even before the story properly begins, an alert rooster notices some small green leaves on the old tree and announces, “Spring is almost here!” He hightail-feathers it off to tell his farmyard friends. Duck is ready with her garden, Sheep is flying a kite, and Goat is enjoying a rainy-day galoshes dance. And Cow? Cow is bundled up in her knitted hat, scarf, and gloves. Rooster gives an eyeroll and says, “Oh, Cow. Not now.”

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Image copyright Troy Cummings, 2021, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2021. Courtesy of Abrams Appleseed.

Summer comes and Chick, Goat, and Pig are at the beach. Chick dives in. “Feathers flail.” Goat needs a snack. He “chomps a pail.” With an ice cream cone piled high, “Pig is ready. Leaves a trail.” And Cow? She’s all decked out for… sledding. Rooster says, “Oh, Cow. Not now.”

In Fall, Horse knows raking is to be done. Chick munches on an apple. And Sheep is ready with a jack-o-lantern. And Cow? Snuggled into a purple puffy coat, she’s sporting earmuffs and skis, and holding a steaming mug of hot chocolate—with marshmallows. Rooster is flummoxed. “Oh, Cow. Just…wow.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-not-now-cow-rooster

Image copyright Troy Cummings, 2021, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2021. Courtesy of Abrams Appleseed.

Finally, it’s Winter! Pig has fashioned a snowy friend. On his sled, “Horse rounds the bend.” And Duck is gliding on the pond. It’s Cow’s big moment. Is she ready? Well…yes…. For Summer! And as Cow sits on her blanket with her swim fins, swim goggles, and swimming cap on, munching a sandwich from her picnic basket, the farm animals gather round. “We need to talk,” Rooster says.

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Image copyright Troy Cummings, 2021, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2021. Courtesy of Abrams Appleseed.

Little ones will giggle with delight, eager to see what Cow is wearing next in Tammi Sauer’s joyously silly story about a cow who likes to celebrate the seasons her way—or is she just a bit mixed up? Either way, preschool– and kindergarten-age kids will love enthusiastically chiming in every time Rooster says, “Oh, Cow. Not Now.” Sauer’s simple structure, short sentences, and engaging triple rhymes make it easy for little ones to join in on subsequent readings.

Troy Cummings brings all the sweetness and fun of the farm animals’ seasonal activities to life in his lively illustrations. To open each sequence, the limbs from the tree where Rooster first notices spring blossoming are set against appropriately colored backgrounds and show signs of the transitions to summer, fall, and winter. Throughout Cummings’ candy-hued spring, sunny summer, fiery fall, and icy winter landscapes, Duck, Sheep, Goat, Horse, Chick, and Pig enjoy traditional fun. And then comes Cow, with her progressively bundled-up attire that bamboozles increasingly exasperated Rooster. The final, hilarious payoff comes when winter hits and Cow shows up in her bathing suit, floaties, and other swimming aids, with a picnic basket to boot. Kids may notice that no matter what the season or what she’s wearing, Cow looks perfectly happy.

Perfect zany fun that little ones will want to hear again and again, Not Now, Cow is a must addition to all young children’s bookshelves at home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 3 – 5 

Abrams Appleseed, 2021 | ISBN 978-1419746291

Discover more about Tammi Sauer and her books on her website.

To learn more about Troy Cummings, his books, and his art, visit his website.

National Humor Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-share-a-laugh-wordsearch

Share a Laugh! Word Search Puzzle

 

Sharing a laugh with friends makes a day better. Can you find the fifteen words about laughter in this puzzle?

Share a Laugh! Word Search PuzzleShare a Laugh! Word Search Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-not-now-cow-cover

You can find Not Now, Cow at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

April 8 – It’s Read a Road Map Week

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About the Holiday

Are you a lover of cars, road maps, and vehicles? If so, you’ve reached your destination! The first week of April is Read a Road Map Week, a nationwide holiday with mysterious origins. While nobody quite knows who drove this holiday into existence, it is now celebrated annually by road trippers across the US throughout the week, and especially on National Read a Road Map Day on April 5th. The holiday draws attention to the importance of roadmaps and the handiness of learning to read a physical map. In this day and age, drivers often rely on electronic GPS systems to get around. However, roadmaps used to be the only way to find your way to new locations. Learning to read road maps and road signs are useful skills for all. Celebrate this week’s holiday by learning more about how to read maps and road signs and taking a road trip to your local library or bookstore to pick up a copy of Caution! Road Signs Ahead—a perfect holiday read for kids on the go and curious about transportation.

Thanks to Toni Buzzeo and Rise x Penguin Workshop for sharing a copy of Caution! Road Signs Ahead for review consideration. All opinions of the book are my own.

Reviewed by Dorothy Levine

Caution! Road Signs Ahead

Written by Toni Buzzeo | Illustrated by Chi Birmingham

 

Are we there yet?! Do your kids ever feel a bit lost or listless during a looong car ride? Never fear; a lot of us do, and this clever board book is here to help children pass the hours gleefully while answering all of their road-trip questions. Finally, boredom be gone! With colorful infographics, die-cut pages, and clear-cut explanations, Caution! Road Signs Ahead explains the purpose of thirty-five signs kids on the go might see on a car trip in an easy and fun manner.

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Image copyright Chi Birmingham, 2021, text copyright Toni Buzzeo, 2021. Courtesy of Rise x Penguin Workshop.

The book opens with a view out the backseat window of a car on the move. Colored signs pop on a blue background, with big, orange writing along the top. Key words such as “look out, wonder, code, and safe” are bolded in white for young readers to recognize and learn. The book begins with questions for curious backseat riders: “When you look out the windows of a car or bus, do you notice signs on the side of the road? Do you wonder what they all mean?”

The next spread explains, “They are a code to let drivers know how to stay safe, what is nearby or where to pay extra attention. You can learn the code, too!” Readers are then invited on a journey of colorful, realistic signs and easy-to-read explanations of what they tell drivers. Sections on everyday road signs, neighborhood, highway, caution, and nature signages divide the book into digestible portions.

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Image copyright Chi Birmingham, 2021, text copyright Toni Buzzeo, 2021. Courtesy of Rise x Penguin Workshop.

Each section opens with a brief explanation of the context of the signs ahead. For example: for the Highway Signs segment, a bright orange panel detailed with a complicated intersection illustration explains, “Small roads called exits lead you off the highway. Most of these signs tell you what you will find when you take certain exits.” Each description is cheerfully condensed to a single sentence punctuated with an explanation point. The text is fun, easy to read, and clear to understand.

A final spread of brilliant bright color blocks shows all of the signs in one and then invites readers to use their newfound knowledge on their next car ride. A life skills book that is so fun, kids will flip through the pages over and over again, until the signs are naturally memorized. This durable book is carefully crafted and a perfect treasure for every back-seat passenger.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-caution-road-signs-ahead-viewing-area

Image copyright Chi Birmingham, 2021, text copyright Toni Buzzeo, 2021. Courtesy of Rise x Penguin Workshop.

Toni Buzzeo’s twenty-ninth picture book engages young readers in an exploration the world of signage around them. Simple explanations encourage and empower young children with knowledge of the roads they travel. A one-of-a-kind non-fiction picture book that is always relevant, Caution! Road Signs Ahead is a perfect take-along for car trips, train rides, and even strolls around the neighborhood! The book is also a great resource for preschools and lower elementary classrooms to prepare the next generation of drivers to be careful, conscientious, and informed while on the go. What could be better?

Chi Birmingham realistically re-creates the shapes and colors of 35 road signs into tactile, cut-out designs that young readers can physically feel and marvel over. In each spread, the sign is presented on the right with its meaning cleverly posted to the silver “metal” backing of the previous sign. Text and signs are consistent, and clearly labeled, matching the straightforward nature of road signage. The illustrations are mesmerizing and aesthetically pleasing in the unique ways they stack and complement each other. Each section features a new, bold color scheme and creative cut outs. The construction of the catchy explanations and flashy signs come together to produce a gem of a book; a joy to flip through, for children and adults alike. Road trips have just become 35 times better for all—time for a road trip to pick up a copy of this book!

Ages 2 – 5

Rise x Penguin Workshop, 2021 | ISBN 978-0593224328

Discover more about Toni Buzzeo and her books on her website.

To learn more about Chi Birmingham, his books, and his art on his website.

Read a Road Map Week Activities

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-road-trip-word-search

Road Trip Word Search

 

Find words related to driving and road-tripping in this free printable car shaped word search!

Road Trip Word Search PuzzleRoad Trip Word Search Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-Spy-travel-and-transport-game

I Spy Travel & Transport Game

 

While you’re in the car or on a walk, see how many of the sights on this free printable scavenger hunt  from Paper Trail Design you can find!

I Spy Travel & Transport Game

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License Plate Game

 

Check off as many license plates as you can spot on a road trip with this free printable colorful game from Paper Trail Design

License Plate Game Board

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You can find Caution! Road Signs Ahead at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

April 7 – It’s National Humor Month

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About the Holiday

There may be no more infectious sound than the giggle or guffaw of a good laugh. Laughter is therapeutic and can make tough times a little easier. Established in 1976 by comedian and author Larry Wilde, National Humor Month promotes all things funny and raises awareness of the benefits of laughter and joy. The health benefits of an optimistic outlook are well documented, and lightheartedness also improves communication skills and boosts morale. Kids, it seems, are born with the ability to see and appreciate the silliness, absurdity, and fun in life. This month, enjoy the zany side of things by reading funny books, and check out the Funny Literacy Program that offers lots of resources and activities to fill your days with humor! Click here to learn more. Get started with today’s book and enjoy a good guffaw not only during April but every day! 

Edmund the Elephant Who Forgot

Written by Kate Dalgleish | Illustrated by Isobel Lundie

 

You’ve probably heard that elephants never forget. But little “Edmund did forget…a lot.” Still, his mother had entrusted him to pick up supplies for his little brother’s birthday party. She even gave him a song to help improve his memory (“‘Elephants always remember, / Elephants don’t get it wrong. Elephants always remember, As long as they sing this song.'”) and as a back-up, she gave him a list with six items on it.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-edmund-the-elephant-who-forgot-balloons

Image copyright Isobel Lundie, 2021, text copyright Kate Dalgleish, 2021. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

But when he stopped for a moment on his way to the stores, Edmund realized he’s forgotten the list! Meanwhile, Colin the cricket discovered the mix up and hurried after Edmund. Fortunately, Colin had a (typical) elephant’s memory and knew every item on the list. As Edmund came to the first store and pondered what was first on the list, Colin called out “‘It’s a bunch of blue balloons.’”

Despite his big ears, Edmund couldn’t hear the tiny cricket, “but suddenly he saw… ‘Aha! A gang of masked raccoons!’” He picked them up and put them in his wagon. At the next stop, Colin tried to remind Edmund about the “‘…twenty pointy party hats.’” Edmund knew it was something like “bats… or rats,” so when he saw “‘seven sassy dancing cats’” he knew he had it right. He loaded them up and continued on.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-edmund-the-elephant-who-forgot-cats

Image copyright Isobel Lundie, 2021, text copyright Kate Dalgleish, 2021. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

But what was number three? Edmund sang his mother’s song to try and remember while Colin shouted it as loudly as he could. Just then Edmund crashed into exactly the thing he needed. Into the wagon they went. Only three items left. But what was the next one? Colin bellowed the answer, but into the wagon went “‘a swinging baboon known as Betty!’” Edmund hurried to the last two stores and stocked up. Edmund was so proud of himself. “He’d not forgotten a thing!”

When Edmund got home, his mom took one look at his piled-up wagon and shook her head. Colin told her he had “‘tried to help.’” But “‘Edmund,’” his mother asked, “‘did you remember to give out all the invitations?’” What invitations? Edmund exclaimed, “‘You forgot to give them to me!’” But Edmund’s little brother didn’t mind. He thought his party was going to be the best ever!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-edmund-the-elephant-who-forgot-toucans

Image copyright Isobel Lundie, 2021, text copyright Kate Dalgleish, 2021. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Kate Dalgleish’s clever-to-the-max story will have kids laughing out loud as Edmund picks up more and more outrageously silly items for his little brother’s birthday. As Colin the cricket reminds Edmund (and readers) of the actual party supply he’s supposed to buy at each shop, kids will be eager to see how this forgetful elephant interprets what little he does remember. Dalgleish’s pitch-perfect rhythm-and-rhyme pairs will have kids in stitches, and some young wordsmiths may want to try making up their own alternate party decoration. Edmund’s mother’s song is a delight, and kids will love singing along on the repeated choruses. Shrewd touches reveal that everyone has foibles, but in the end we can still enjoy the “best party ever.”

There’s so much wonderful absurdity going on in each of Isobel Lundie’s cartoon-style illustrations that after the first reading, kids and adults will want to start over again to catch all the humorous action, allusions, facial expressions, and, especially, creatures in this busy town. For kids who love search-and-find puzzles, this book is a gift, with untold numbers of things to look for, count, sort, and chuckle over. At the end, one of the raccoons even invites kids to find him twenty-seven times throughout the book. Lundie’s bright colors, delicate line drawings, and lots and lots of witty detail, spotlight the funny text and make this whole package shine.

For story times that are just plain fun, wild, and wacky (and – okay – you can probably throw some math in there too) that will leave kids giggling long after the story’s finished, Edmund the Elephant Who Forgot is definitely one to remember when you’re adding to your home, classroom, or public library collection.

Ages 3 – 7 (and up)

Sterling Children’s Books, 2021 | ISBN 978-1913337391

You can connect with Kate Dalgleish on Twitter.

To learn more about Isobel Lundie and see a portfolio of her art, visit Plum Pudding Illustration Agency.

National Humor Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-made-you-laugh-word-search

Made You Laugh! Word Search Puzzle

 

Humor and laughing are such a part of our lives that there are lots of words for this universal emotion. Can you find all the words for laughter in this printable puzzle?

Made You Laugh! Word Search PuzzleMade You Laugh! Word Search Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-edmund-the-elephant-who-forgot-cover

You can find Edmund the Elephant Who Forgot at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

April 6 – It’s National Garden Month

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About the Holiday

Expanded from National Garden Week in 2002, National Garden Month, encourages both avid gardeners and those new to this rewarding activity to turn over some dirt, plant seeds, and prepare to tend the little sprouts on their way through the season. A perfect activity for the whole family—even the youngest loves playing in the dirt and planting seeds!—gardening is a wonderful way to teach kids about the growth cycle, pollinators, nutrition, patience, and more! If it’s warm enough to start planting where you live, engage your kids in preparing and planting your garden. If it’s still a little chilly, gather the whole family and plan this year’s garden!

In the Garden

By Emma Giuliani

 

In her stunningly illustrated interactive guide through the seasons, Emma Giuliani introduces Plum and her little brother, Robin, and invites readers to join them as they tend to their garden and all the plants, animals, and birds that call it home. Plum and Robin begin at winter’s end. “This morning it’s cold. It’s not yet spring, but, in the garden, Plum and her brother Robin see the first catkins appearing on the branches of the willows and hazels. The blossoming mimosa makes the gardeners impatient for spring to come.” As Robin counts the long, drooping catkins, Plum rakes a layer of compost over the ground. On the facing page, readers get a close-up view of the fuzzy catkins, can peek inside a bud, burrow underground with earthworms just waking from hibernation, and view a few early bloomers. They also learn about what makes up the earth’s soil and get a recipe for compost.

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Copyright Emma Giuliani, 2020, courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.

With the arrival of spring, Plum is in her little greenhouse, planting vegetable seeds and spritzing the soil with water to keep it moist while Robin repots some plants who have spent the winter in the greenhouse. Outside, Plum aerates the garden bed with a pitchfork, careful of any tiny creatures below. Children can open the door to Plum’s well-stocked shed to see all the tools tidily stored there and lift the flaps to look inside a bulb and help a hyacinth, a daffodil, and a tulip grow.

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Copyright Emma Giuliani, 2020, courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.

At last the warm weather of spring has arrived. The cherry trees are blossoming, and Plum and Robin are setting stakes and planting bean seeds. Next, they provide protection for the tender strawberry plants that are beginning to bloom. Young gardeners will enjoy opening a bean seed to learn what’s inside and then following its growing process. The bees are visiting the cherry blossoms, pollinating the flowers and making honey. What does a bee see as it hovers around the flower? Pull down the flap to see for yourself and learn all the parts of a flower. What other plants are flowering now? Open the flap to see!

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Copyright Emma Giuliani, 2020, courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.

Summer begins and “what a joy to be in the garden in June! The gentle breeze, the smell of cut grass, and the tangy taste of strawberries and cherries make the gardeners smile.” While Plum waters the tomato plants, “Robin looks for ripe strawberries under the leaves.” Join him! Robin is also picking cherries before the birds eat them. How do those bright red, round fruits grow? Lift the flap to learn and see how they develop from flower to fruit. Plum is getting help with the aphids on the bean plants from industrious—and hungry—ladybugs. “Dragonfly larvae are transforming into graceful flying insects….Their presence is a sign of a healthy garden.”

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Copyright Emma Giuliani, 2020, courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.

It’s high summer and the garden is glorious. Bean pods hang from the vines, and Plum contemplates whether they are ready to pick. She may leave some “husks dry out on the plant before picking them.” Dried completely indoors, they can be stored and eaten during the fall and winter. Take a look inside a pod to see the seven red beans there. Flowers greet you too: an orange marigold with petals like a pinwheel, a brilliant pink and purple fuchsia, and a perky mignon dahlia. Robin took cuttings of these plants and potted them to grow some more. Learn how you can do that with your plants too!

The summer heat is waning and the days are growing shorter. Fall is here. The catkins of early spring have become hazelnuts that are ready to be harvested. Even the squirrel approves! Plum and Robin teach you how to store them—and when to pick the winter squash and keep them for months as well. Can you count the number of seeds inside the winter squash? Plum’s beautiful trellised pear tree is bearing sweet fruit. Yum! But look out—a crafty rabbit is after the last leafy vegetables in the garden. 

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Copyright Emma Giuliani, 2020, courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.

The air is chilly again and winter is on the horizon. “Plum and Robin have donned their warmest clothes and gone out to collect the dead leaves. Some leaves will feed the compost, others will become mulch to protect plants over the winter. The hedgehogs can use the rest of the leaves in making their homes.” Do you see the pile of crunchy leaves? Lift them gently…shhh! A hedgehog is snoozing underneath. Robin and Plum have built an insect hotel to keep the bugs cozy during the winter and have filled the greenhouse again. For the colorful birds who stay awhile or all winter, Robin and Plum put out a bird feeder and fill it with locally produced seeds.

After putting all of their tools back in the shed, Plum and Robin head indoors to plan next year’s garden and “watch eagerly for the very first signs of spring.”

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Copyright Emma Giuliani, 2020, courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.

If your family tends a garden or is thinking of starting one, Emma Guiliani’s superb book is a must. At 16 inches tall, In the Garden provides fascinating facts about plants, insects, and animals; helpful tips on when and how to plant a variety of fruit, vegetables, and flowers, information on natural ways to ward off pests; and how to recognize when fruit and vegetables are ready for picking and how to store them. Through copious flaps, children get inside views of flowers, seeds, buds, and vegetables to learn the names of each part and how they contribute to the growth of the plant. Along the way, young and adult gardeners discover how early gardening can begin, directions on how to create and use compost, when bushes can be planted, information on pollination; and how to winter over the garden for the coming spring.

Giuliani’s crisp, lush illustrations are marvels, combining intricate paper cuts that replicate the shapes of delicate bulbs and buds, flowers and seeds, smooth and serrated leaves, the long bean pod, and even Plum’s garden shed with a window in the door. Her extraordinarily beautiful color palette immerses readers in the garden experience; you can almost smell the rich earth, hear the bees buzzing at the blossoms, and feel the air changing season to season.

A brilliant resource and a joy to peruse, In the Garden is a book that adults and children—both gardeners or nature lovers—will share throughout the seasons and from year to year. The book is most highly recommended for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 7 – 12

Princeton Architectural Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1616898939

You can connect with Emma Giuliani on Instagram.

National Garden Month Activity

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Plant a Flower Garden Game

 

With this fun game you and your family and friends can grow gardens inside! Roll the dice to see whose garden will fully blossom first!

Supplies

Directions

Object: The object of the game is for each player to fill their garden or garden rows with flowers. Depending on the ages of the players, the game can be adjusted to fill all of the rows, some or all rows, or just one.           

  1. Print one Game Board for each player
  2. Print one or more sets of Flower Playing Cards for each player, depending on how  (for sturdier playing items, print on card stock)
  3. Cut the flowers into their individual playing cards
  4. Print one Flower Playing Die and assemble it (for a sturdier die, print on card stock)
  5. Color the “dirt” on the Garden Plot with the crayon (optional)
  6. Choose a player to go first
  7. The player rolls the die and then “plants” the flower rolled in a row on the game board
  8. Play moves to the person on the right
  9. Players continue rolling the die and “planting” flowers until each of the number of determined rows have been filled with flowers or one row has been filled with all six flowers.
  10. The first person to “grow” all of their flowers wins!

To play a printable Vegetable Garden Board Game, click here.

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You can find In the Garden at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | Princeton Architectural Press

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound 

April 5 – National Dandelion Day

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About the Holiday

As warm weather and spring rains begin preparing the ground for grass, flowers, and gardens, there’s another distinctive sprout that appears early – and often. Of course, it’s the dandelion! With its sunny flowers and fly-away seeds, this little plant is part of spring and summer landscapes around the world. The dandelion is far from just a weed, however. In fact, the dandelion is technically an herb and has many health benefits. Dandelion leaves can be used in salads, soups, and teas, and they provide aid with regulating blood sugar, wound healing, gastrointestinal problems, and even vision. Known for its healthy properties since 659 BCE, the dandelion is a staple for many global cultures. To celebrate, check in your favorite grocery store or farmers market for dandelion leaves and try a new recipe! Here are ten delicious-looking dishes from Kitchn!

Thanks to Sleeping Bear Press for sharing a copy of Little Dandelion Seeds the World for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Little Dandelion Seeds the World

Written by Julia Richardson | Illustrated by Kristen Howdeshell  and Kevin Howdeshell

 

A little girl in a South African city finds a dandelion growing in a crack in the sidewalk. She blows on the fluffy head and “swish, swirl, one hundred seeds fly.” One seed flies to an African plain, where it drops into the grass, roots, and grows. “The flower fades. Fluff puffs. POOF!” and a breeze carries one hundred seeds into the air past an elephant and her baby.

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Image copyright Kristen Howdeshell and Kevin Howdeshell, 2021, text copyright Julia Richardson. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

One seed takes a ride on a cheetah’s ear until it is caught by the wind again and finds itself in Asia. Here it roots and grows. When the flower turns to fluff, a curious panda gives it a swat and “swish, swirl, one hundred seeds fly.” One of the seeds gets lifted up in a cyclone and deposited “far, far away…in Australia.”

Here a kangaroo, hopping along, jumps on the plant, now just a fuzzy ball. Seeds take to the air, dancing on the breeze. One seed circles over a sailboat and latches onto the pantleg of a boy standing on the bow. When he disembarks, he takes the seed with him up, up into the hills. The seed jumps off and “a little dandelion blooms in North America.”

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Image copyright Kristen Howdeshell and Kevin Howdeshell, 2021, text copyright Julia Richardson. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

This little plant meets up with a skunk and a bird, and a seed wings its way to South America. Disturbed by a snake slithering by, the puff explodes, sending its seeds every which way. “One little seed slips into the sea, far, far away.” Riding on the current it finds a rock to cling too. “Down with a root. Up with a shoot. A little dandelion blooms in Antarctica.” Another dandelion’s life begins. Finally, with the flick of a seal’s tail, the seeds scatter, one “parachuting. Pirouetting” into Europe, where the familiar, graceful dance continues.

Backmatter includes an illustrated world map that shows the route of the dandelion seeds and approximate landing sites on each continent and an Author’s Note about how dandelions grow and reseed themselves as well as a question to spark discussion.

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Image copyright Kristen Howdeshell and Kevin Howdeshell, 2021, text copyright Julia Richardson. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Julia Richardson’s lyrical descriptions and repeated phrases invite kids to follow dandelion seeds as they travel the world. Richardson’s engaging storytelling will keep kids guessing as to where the seeds will travel next while teaching them about the ingenuity and resilience of nature. The global aspect of the story reminds readers that we are all connected through common experiences, the plants and animals with whom we share our planet, and our responsibilities for conservation.

Through Kristen and Kevin Howdeshell’s bold textured illustrations, readers travel the world with tiny dandelion seeds from the sunbaked African savanna, where cheetahs and elephants roam to a verdant bamboo forest, where a panda almost walks off the page to play with the dandelion, to the lush hills of a coastal town and beyond. In each place local children interact with their environment, giving readers a feeling of inclusion too.

An eye-catching and lyrical introduction to nature science that will spark enthusiasm for learning not only about dandelions but about how all plants grow and thrive, Little Dandelion Seeds the World would be a high-interest addition to science, geography, and social studies lessons for classrooms and homeschoolers as well as to public library collections.

Ages 5 – 8 

Sleeping Bear Press, 2021 | ISBN 978-1534110533

Discover more about Julia Richardson and her books on her website.

To learn more about Kristen Howdeshell and Kevin Howdeshell, their books, and their art, visit their website, The Brave Union.

National Dandelion Day Activity

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Little Dandelion Seeds the World Activity Pages

 

Grab your crayons and pencils and have fun with this printable coloring page and word search puzzle from Sleeping Bear Press!

Little Dandelion Seeds the World Activity Pages

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You can find Little Dandelion Seeds the World at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review