November 30 – It’s Picture Book Month

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About the Holiday

For little learners, picture books provide one of the best ways to interact with facts about all kinds of subjects. Loaded with illustrations or photographs that let kids see exciting and beautiful details, nonfiction picture books bring to life science, history, biographies, nature, and so much more of the world around us. This month, take a look for nonfiction picture books about your child’s passions to add to your home library.

Seeing Stars: A Complete Guide to the 88 Constellations

By Sara Gillingham

 

If you have a young astronomer in the family and are looking for a book that will make their eyes twinkle like stars on a clear, dark night, Sara Gillingham’s magnificent guide to all eighty-eight internationally recognized constellations is a must. Combining information on how and where to find each constellation, the fascinating stories and/or myths surrounding them, and stylistically gorgeous illustrations, Seeing Stars offers children and adults not only a resource to use when stargazing, but a sit-down-and-explore beauty to enjoy any time.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Seeing Stars opens with brief and illuminating discussions on what constellations are, who invented them, using asterisms and brightest stars to find a constellation, which constellations are visible when and where, and the art of stargazing.  A chapter on the ancient constellations takes in the signs of the zodiac (I’m an Aquarius and learned that the famous water carrier of the sign is none other than Ganymede, who in ancient Greece was “considered the most beautiful man alive…. One day, in the middle of a quiet life tending sheep, Ganymede was snatched by an eagle and taken to Zeus” who put him to work as “the official cup-bearer to the gods.”).

In this section, readers will also find the constellations created from “well-known stories, characters, animals, and sacred objects” as well as the  heroes and gods of Greek mythology. Here, readers learn about Hydra, the water snake. Hydra, the largest constellation, covers one fourth of the sky in a “twisting line” that at one end curves inward to make a “small irregular polygon” that serves as the serpent’s head. She was “so wretched that even her breath could kill someone,” and was vanquished by Hercules in the second of his labors. Pegasus, Persius, Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, and Orion are just a few of the other well-known figures from the ancient world.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Next, come the modern constellations mapped by European explorers and named for exotic and even mythical creatures in the late 1500s and 1600s. One of these early astronomers was Elisabeth Hevelius, considered to be one of the first female astronomers. Colorful birds of paradise inspired these stargazers to name a small cluster of stars that “make a line with a narrow V on the end, much like the point of a beak” Apus (from the Greek word apous or “footless”), after some European navigators believed the birds had no feet.

What constellation outlines an animal with a “long neck like a camel and a body that is covered in ‘spots’”? Camelopardalis, of course! Or you may be more familiar with this animal’s more common name: giraffe. Chameleons, doves, dolphinfish, cranes, lizards, lions, and lynx also appear in our skies but there’s room, too, for the more whimsical, like Monoceros – or unicorn – and the phoenix.

Modern constellations also pay homage to invention and discovery. These include Caelum, the chisel, named for an engraver’s tool invented in the 1600s to “carve fine lines into printing plates” for book production; Circinus, the compass; Microscopium, the microscope; Telescopium, the telescope; and Pictor, the painter’s easel.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

A Resource section provides information on tools for stargazing, eight circular maps that chart the constellations seen from the northern and southern skies over three-month increments throughout the year, an illustrated guide to asterisms, resources for further reading, and an extensive glossary and index.

Each constellation is highlighted with a two-page spread. The left-hand page is attractively divided into four sections that provide an image of the constellation created from lines connecting stars in three different sizes that indicate their brightness, tell where the constellation is found and it’s proportion to other constellations, a circular map that spotlights the constellation among others nearby, and a paragraph on the story or myth surrounding the constellation. On the right, the image of the god, animal, or object that inspired the constellation floats on a midnight-blue background and contains within it the stars that make up the constellation connected to show its shape. The brightest star in the constellation is highlighted.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Sara Gillingham’s writing style is knowledgeable and entertaining, opening up the world of astronomy to experts and novices alike with the kind of storytelling that captivates while it teaches.

Special mention must be made of the dazzling cover and dust jacket, which together recreate the depth of the night sky. The shimmering gold cover, splashed with the image of the Milky Way, shines through the tiny laser-cut “stars” on the deep blue dust jacket, making a stunning and interactive introduction to this well-crafted book. Kids will love finding and naming the constellations they see on the cover after reading about them inside.

Perfectly conceived and executed, Seeing Stars is a book the whole family can enjoy and will spark many trips outside to gaze at the stars with new interest and understanding. The book would make a much-cherished gift for astronomers, armchair stargazers, space buffs, and those who love mythology and history. It’s a terrific addition to home, classroom, and public libraries and would be just as at home on the coffee table as on the bookshelf.

Ages 8 – 12 and up

Phaidon Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714877723

Discover more about Sara Gillingham, her books, and her art on her website.

Picture Book Month Activity

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Read the Stars Word Search Puzzle

 

Sometimes the constellations can seem hidden among all the other stars. Can you find the names of eighteen constellations in this printable Read the Stars Word Search Puzzle?

Read the Stars Word Search Puzzle | Read the Stars Word Search Solution

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You can find Seeing Stars: A Complete Guide to the 88 Constellations at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 25 – International Artists Day

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About the Holiday

Established in 2004 by Canadian Romantic Realism artist Chris MacClure, today’s holiday celebrates artists working in all mediums from painting to sculpture, photography to music, writing to dance, and many more. Creative expression is a universal language, and society benefits when art and artists of all types are embraced and celebrated. The goal of International Artists Day is to celebrate the contributions of artists and to raise their stature and visibility around the world. A love of the arts can start at the youngest ages by exposing children—and even babies—to a variety of creative mediums and allowing them to explore their talents. For more information about International Artists Day, visit the IAD  website.

My Art Book of Love

Written by Shana Gozansky

 

Don’t be surprised if you feel a flutter of the heart upon opening the cover of My Art Book of Love. Page after page of gloriously reproduced paintings from thirty-four artists from the past and working today demonstrate love in all of its actions, forms, colors, and meanings. Divided into six sections, the paintings touch on what love is, how love feels, what love looks like, and other qualities of this tender emotion.

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Courtesy of Phaidon Publishing, copyright 2018.

Accompanying each painting is a lyrical phrase that describes its feeling or subject and combines with the others in the section to create a moving verse that will warm the hearts of  little ones—and even older children. To begin, “Love is… soft snuggles…” represented by a detail from Gustav Klimt’s The Three Ages of Woman, in which a mother and child sleep cuddled together with the mother resting her head on her child’s soft curls. Love is also “tender nuzzles,” and any animal lover or child with a pet will recognize the shared affection as a little girl strokes her pet in Pierre Bonnard’s Little Girl with Cat.

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Courtesy of Phaidon Publishing, copyright 2018.

The comfort an older sister provides for her younger sibling tugs at the heart in Paul Gauguin’s Piti Teina (Two Sisters), and Alan Katz demonstrates that growing up with a bunch of sisters can be an adventure in The Ryan Sisters, in which four girls walk down the road barefoot with their arms around each other. As an African-American boy wears his dad’s fedora while getting a big hug in Emory Douglas’s Father and Son, “Love feels… Safe.” A father’s encouragement can make a little one feel “brave” as in Vincent Van Gogh’s First Steps, after Millet, where a father spreads his arms to welcome a baby toddling his way.

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Courtesy of Phaidon Publishing, copyright 2018.

In all the ways it is expressed, “Love is Beautiful.” Salvador Dali captured the joy a father feels for his child in Fiesta at the Hermitage, a fragment of which spotlights a father playfully lifting his infant above his head. Henry Moore’s sculpture Family Group lets children visually experience the solidarity of the family unit as a mother, father, and two children are connected through touch. Two vibrant and familiar artworks close out this poignant tribute and remind readers that “Love is for everyone!” as the linked figures dancing around a red heart in Keith Haring’s untitled painting and the bold and boxed letters L-O-V-E in Robert Indiana’s Philadelphia Love beautifully demonstrate.

Back matter presents thumbnail images of each art piece along with information on the artist, the work, and which museum it can be found in.

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Courtesy of Phaidon Publishing, copyright 2018.

Exquisitely curated to offer a range of artistic styles, cultural touchstones, and emotional responses, My Art Book of Love is a sophisticated board book that is part museum, part love letter and a completely original and moving way to share and talk about love with babies, toddlers and older kids during quiet, cuddly story times. The book can also be used in classrooms to accompany reading, writing, and art lessons. The book makes an inspired choice as a gift or to add to any home, classroom, and public library.

Ages 2 – 4 and up

Phaidon, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714877181

International Artists Day Activity

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I Love Blocks

 

Bare wooden blocks can provide lots of artistic fun for both young and older kids. Painted with craft paint or chalk board paint, they can be written on or drawn on with chalk. They can be stacked to make sentences or towers or sculptures.

celebrate-picture-book-picture-book-review-blocks-craft-2Connected with glue or adhesive Velcro tape, blocks can become a robot or a giraffe, laid end-to-end they can be a train or a snake. Supply some cloth, play jewels, googly eyes, foam shapes, glitter, or other items and let kids play with their imagination and creativity!

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You can find My Art Book of Love at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 24 – It’s Arts and Humanities Month

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About the Holiday

Established in 1993 as a celebration of culture and the arts, National Arts and Humanities Month encourages people to begin a lifelong love of exploring and participating in the arts. Throughout the month, special events are held by arts organizations in communities around the country. A terrific way to instill an appreciation of the arts and humanities in children is to share books like today’s with even the youngest readers.

Squares & Other Shapes: with Josef Albers (First Concepts with Fine Artists)

Paintings by Josef Albers

 

Opening Squares & Other Shapes, readers encounter a vibrant magenta square nesting in an autumn maple leaf-hued square which floats in a square of clear, winter-sky blue. On the next page two orange squares beckon you to follow into the glowing, yellow center square. Could it be a doorway or window leading somewhere?

In another painting, a bold yellow rectangle and an equally bold blue rectangle host guests: “two little rectangles lying down for a nap.” But the calm is shattered on the next page as stacks of red and blue rectangles shake and tumble: “Watch Out! It’s raining rectangles!”

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Courtesy of phaidon.com

Now circles want a turn, and they want to have fun! In a large black rectangle a white circle and a red circle play stoplight: “Circle, Circle, Stop!” while on the next page blue, black and spirally circles jump and frolic—“Bounce, Circles, Bounce!” Turn the page—can you count all of the little circles in the rectangle or all of the baby circles in the rectangle on the right-hand page? Some of the babies are leaping away—or are they just joining the group? What do you think?

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Courtesy of phaidon.com

Next the black rectangle is back, but this time with two white squares inside. Wait a minute—how did those little yellow circles get into the bottom square? “Hey circles, get out of that square!” Of course triangles don’t want to be left out. Dusky triangles in many sizes connected tip to tip enjoy their light, white background, but on the next page they’re left in shadow—“Hey triangles, who turned out the lights?”

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Courtesy of phaidon.com

Be careful turning the page to look at the two intersecting triangles: “Ouch, these triangles look sharp!” Maybe it’s better to move on to the big, vivid triangle on the right. Oooh, so many colors! Nine, in fact! Hmmm… “Is this one big triangle, or lots of little triangles?” These paintings are getting more complex! Now there are “blue squares in pink squares, pink squares in blue squares; rectangles in rectangles, circles in circles, and more triangles in triangles. But here’s a different painting: the rectangles are perfect rectangles, but the squares are a little off, and what kinds of shapes do those curved lines make?—“Funny shapes in funny shapes!” And the last painting? Back to squares. Red, purple, and blue squares. “Beautiful squares.”

Following the paintings, the last page provides a captivating biography about Josef Albers’ life and work aimed at the book’s young audience.

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Courtesy of phaidon.com

Imagine being able to own a stunning collection of famous paintings by a world-renowned artist and educator to teach your child about shapes, color, and art. With Squares & Other Shapes by Josef Albers you can! The second in the First Concepts with Fine Artists series, Squares & Other Shapes presents readers with more than 30 painting by Josef Albers, one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. Most well-known for his Homage to the Square paintings, Albers worked with color and shapes to challenge perceptions and promote creative thinking.

Shapes are one of the earliest concepts introduced to babies and young children. Even the youngest readers will be riveted by the beautifully reproduced paintings in this large board book that present squares, circles, rectangles, and trianges in clear but creative ways. The easily understood labels, repetition, and recognizable patterns offer key strategies that are known to build strong reading and comprehension skills. Kids will love the humorous text that brings the paintings to life, helping them to also see that art is not static, but active and open to interpretation by each viewer.

Squares & Other Shapes with Josef Albers is a wonderfully conceived concept book that can grow with children as it offers readers enjoyment and education on so many levels. The book would be an often-sought-out addition to home and library bookshelves and also makes a perfect present for baby showers and other gift-giving holidays.

Ages birth – 5 (and up)

Phaidon Press, 2016 | ISBN 978-0714872568

National Arts and Humanities Month Activity

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Shapes Art

 

To make art like Josef Albers, kids can use these printable shapes to create their own pictures!

Supplies

Directions

  1. Print the shape templates on white or colored paper
  2. Have kids color the shapes 
  3. Cut out the shapes and let kids put them together in various patterns. This is a fun activity for adults to share with younger children too!

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You can find Squares & Other Shapes with Josef Albers at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

October 1 – World Architecture Day

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About the Holiday

Established in 1986 by the International Union of Architects, World Architecture Day is celebrated on the first Monday in October to coincide with the United Nations-sponsored World Habitat Day. Each year a different theme highlights the important aspects of architecture in our lives. This year’s theme is “Architecture…for a Better World” and emphasizes the issues, challenges, and rewards of housing the world’s citizens. To celebrate today take a walk around your town or city with your kids and study the buildings and how they fit into history or new construction in your area. You can also research a famous building and the architect who designed it!

Brick, Who Found Herself in Architecture

Written by Joshua David Stein | Illustrated by Julia Rothman

 

When Brick was a baby, she marveled at all the tall buildings and “wondered how anything could grow so big.” Her mother told her that “‘great things begin with small bricks.’” And Brick saw that it was true. When she looked closely, she saw that all the buildings she admired were made of bricks just like her. Brick wondered if there were buildings like this in all towns and even in other countries.

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Image copyright Julia Rothman, 2018, text copyright Joshua David Stein, 2018. Courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Pretty soon, Brick was old enough to satisfy her curiosity on her own and “find her place in the world.” Brick bravely set sail and landed at Malbork Castle, which had high walls with slits for shooting arrows through. Next, she visited The Ark, which was in the desert. Brick saw that both of these castles had suffered from years of fighting. “Brick did not want to fight. So she moved on.”

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Image copyright Julia Rothman, 2018, text copyright Joshua David Stein, 2018. Courtesy of Phaidon Press.

She saw churches, mosques, synagogues, and a Buddhist temple. She thought they were beautiful, “but they did not call out to her. And so she kept going.” She walked on walls and looked down both sides, but she did not want to divide places and people, so she kept going. She visited apartment houses, houses in the suburbs, and even a country house with a “chimney billowing smoke.” But Brick knew that “homes eventually empty and hearths grow cold.” This was not the future she wanted. Where did she belong? Brick wondered.

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Image copyright Julia Rothman, 2018, text copyright Joshua David Stein, 2018. Courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Brick considered all the buildings she had seen, and she remembered the words her mother had told her long ago about great things. She sat at the end of her path and pondered into the night. When the sun rose, Brick saw the answer right in front of her. She settled herself in and “became part of a wide and lovely path” that would guide other bricks to find where they belonged too.

An Afterword presents a description, complete with photograph, of the various buildings Brick encounters in her travels.

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Image copyright Julia Rothman, 2018, text copyright Joshua David Stein, 2018. Courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Full of lovely metaphors and deeply considered thoughts on the way architecture models the human heart as well as how people design their buildings and structures for purposes both positive and negative, Joshua David Stein’s story is a unique look at growing up. The brick makes a particularly compelling character, for in any building each brick holds a crucial place in the design while also joining with others to create a durable whole—just as it is for any individual in a strong, vibrant community.

As the little brick is exposed to the various roles she could dedicate her life to, she thinks not only of the immediate reward of “having a job” but of what her philosophies are and what she wants her future to be. In a perhaps surprising—but welcome—choice, Brick decides that instead of being part of a grand edifice, becoming a step along the path and guiding others is her calling. This recognition of teachers, parents, caregivers, and other such role models is inspired and uplifting.

Julia Rothman’s light touch, variety of reds, and whimsical black-and-white line drawings of foliage, ancillary elements, and toy-strewn backyards beautifully showcase a world of sturdy brick buildings while giving readers a sense of the soaring awe with which Brick views her city and the landmarks she visits. Rothman’s use of perspective juxtaposes tiny Brick against towering structures mirroring a feeling that young readers may know well. The path Brick travels is ever-present, running from edge to edge of the pages. The final two-page spread of Brick happily fitted into a path that meanders through a lushly landscaped park, which is being crossed by a young brick on his way to the city in the distance will delight readers.

Brick, Who Found Herself in Architecture is an original and lyrical look at individuality, growing up, and finding one’s place in the world. The book would be a strong addition to school, classroom, and public libraries and an encouraging and reassuring choice for home bookshelves as well.

Ages 4 – 8

Phaidon Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714876313

To learn more about Julia Rothman, her books and her art, visit her website.

World Architecture Day Activity

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Build Your Identity 

 

Sometimes it’s good for kids to remind themselves of all the things that they like, stops along their path, and even words that describe them. With this craft, kids can make a “brick” that stands strong with all of their unique qualities. While a wooden block can be used to make a brick, if you have a real brick that can be used too!

Supplies

  • Wooden rectangular block, available at craft stores
  • Brick red craft paint
  • Paint brush
  • Chalk

Directions

  1. Paint the block with the craft paint, let dry
  2. Write words about yourself, things you like to do, inspirational places you’ve been, even places and things you’d like to do in the future.
  3. Display your brick on a shelf, hang on a wall, or use it as a book end

Classroom Idea

As a story extension for the classroom, cut one brick-sized rectangle from red construction paper, heavy-stock paper, or poster board for each student. Have them write about themselves, about what they think they would like to do in the future, or about some other topic pertinent to your class. Let students display their bricks by working together to “build” their own path in the classroom.

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You can find Brick, Who Found Herself in Architecture at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

September 30 – National Hot Mulled Cider Day

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About the Holiday

As the weather turns cooler and eventually cold, hot drinks become a favorite for their warming properties and the cozy feeling they give inside. Hot Mulled Cider adds a festive touch to parties, dinners, or just sitting by the fire. The drink is made by heating apple cider until it’s nearly boiling and then simmering with adding spices, such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves, as well as orange peel or other fruits. One sip will tell you that the apple-picking season of autumn has come and remind you that winter is on its way.

A Pile of Leaves

By Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin

 

As you rake up fallen leaves when autumn turns them from green to vibrant reds, yellows, and oranges and the wind plucks them from the trees, you know that with each swipe nature may present a little treasure. A Pile of Leaves is just as surprising, as page after page reveals deeper and deeper layers that hide colors, life, and even forgotten or lost items.

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Copyright Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin, 2018. Courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Clever transparent pages are rimmed in bold fall colors and painted with cottonwood, oak, maple, birch, ash, and other types of leaves. In their placement they hide something that becomes visible only with the turn of the page. The final little discovery will cause readers to smile in appreciation for the realism in this artistic look at a highlight of autumn.

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Copyright Jason Fulford and Tamara Shopsin, 2018. Courtesy of Phaidon Press.

The fresh and creative design of this board book will keep young readers enthralled as they ask again and again to see what’s underneath each leaf. The book is a wonderful way to inspire nature walks with children and to excite them to explore leaf piles and other seasonal changes in their own backyard.

An illustrated key in the back of the book tells the names of the leaves, insects, and other objects found on the pages.

Ages 2 – 5

Phaidon Press, Published in partnership with the Whitney Museum of American Art, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714877204

To learn more about Jason Fulford and his books, visit his website.

Discover more about Tamara Shopsin, her books, and her art on her website.

National Hot Mulled Cider Day Activity

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Painted Flowers and Trees

 

Little ones are naturally creative, and with a variety of paints, your child will have fun mixing colors and making their own fall flowers and trees.

Supplies

  • Craft paints in different colors
  • Small paper plates
  • Straws (optional)

Or

  • Construction paper (optional)
  • Poster board or large piece of heavy paper
  • Paper grass
  • Paint brush
  • Glue

Directions

  1. Put out a variety of paints and some small paper plates
  2. Let your child paint the paper plates, with single paints or mixing colors as they want
  3. Let the plates dry
  4. Glue the plate or plates to a large piece of poster board or heavy paper
  5. Add a straw as a stem or cut a trunk from construction paper
  6. Add shredded paper grass or a strip of construction paper for the ground
  7. Add leaves if making fall flowers

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-pile-of-leaves-cover

You can find A Pile of Leaves at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

August 26 – National Cherry Popsicle Day

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About the Holiday

On a hot, steamy day, there’s nothing like a popsicle to refresh you! While today’s holiday celebrates the cherry-flavored pop, there are lots of other flavors and combos of flavors to enjoy as well. Like many food innovations, the popsicle has an interesting backstory. It seems that in 1905 when Frank Epperson of San Francisco was 11 years old, he was mixing up a batch of soda on his porch. He left the stirring stick in it overnight. That night the temperatures dropped to freezing, and when Frank came out in the morning, he discovered a new taste sensation. He went on to experiment with fruit flavors. He introduced the first popsicle in 1922 at a fireman’s ball. The treat was a huge success. In 1924, Frank applied for a patent for his “Epsicle.” He later renamed it the popsicle. Today, enjoy your favorite flavor popsicle—nature’s version is coming soon enough!

Food Hide and Sneak

By Bastien Contraire

 

With only one line, Bastien Contraire sends young readers off on a scavenger hunt to find the interloper among the images. “One of these things is almost like the others…,” he prompts, while a page containing three fruits—a red pear with a green stem, a green apple with a red stem, and a lime with a little red end—share space with a red-and-green beach ball. Pretty tricky!

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Copyright Bastien Contraire, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Turning the page, the hunt gets a little more difficult as there are six candies to search through—or is it five? Hmmm…. The next spread is trickier still with red-and-green vegetables, plus one brown eggplant vying for attention. Wait? Is that red-and-green frilly thing really a veggie? All these decisions can make a reader hungry! Fortunately, you can eat up the next puzzle that’s a delicious lineup of popsicles and ice-cream treats and one… do you see it?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-food-hide-and-sneak-vegetables

Copyright Bastien Contraire, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

The next few pages offer fruit, bottles, mushrooms, and an array of sandwiches that are all sheltering one misfit in their midst. Kids will say yum at the variety of desserts they encounter later in the book while quacking up at the odd one out who does a good job of hiding among the pastry. It may take a bit of looking to find the imposter in the deli, and by the end of the book, little ones will surely be able to signal which object doesn’t belong among the cans and jars.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-food-hide-and-sneak-mushrooms

Copyright Bastien Contraire, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Bastien Contraire’s series of Hide and Sneak board books are great fun for little readers who love to use their powers of deduction and categorization to solve the puzzles. In his stylized, stenciled images, Contraire cleverly uses red, green, and brown tones as well as the positioning of the items to disguise the outlier just enough to make the hunt challenging. Contraire also adds sly humor to the quest as the nonconformist often has some kind of connection to the other items—a similarity or association that’s fun for readers to discuss.

Enjoyably challenging for young readers, Food Hide and Sneak is an entertaining addition to home, preschool, and kindergarten libraries.

Ages 2 – 5

Phaidon Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714877235

Discover more about Bastien Contraire, his books, and his art on his website.

National Cherry Popsicle Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-patterned-popsicle-sticks-game

Patterned Popsicle Sticks

 

Here’s an easy-to-make game for little ones that will challenge their powers of observation while they’re having fun!

Supplies

  • 4 popsicle sticks per set
  • Markers

Directions

For each set of popsicle sticks:

  1. On three popsicle sticks draw the same pattern
  2. On the last popsicle stick change the pattern in some way
  3. Lay the set of popsicle sticks out for a child to choose the stick that is different
  4. Make multiple sets, playing with patterns, colors, and designs

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You can find Food Hide and Sneak at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 26 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

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About the Holiday

Get Caught Reading Month was established in 1999 by the Association of American Publishers to encourage people of all ages to read more. Authors, illustrators, celebrities, athletes, and others participate by sharing pictures of themselves reading an old favorite or new book on social media. Schools, libraries, bookstores, and community venues hold special programs throughout the month. For more information and to find resources, visit the Get Caught Reading website.

Boats Are Busy

By Sara Gillingham

 

In Sara Gillingham’s beautiful collection of the various kinds of boats that sail our lakes and oceans, she introduces kids to ships, their purpose, and the meaning of maritime flags that captains use to communicate with each other. First up is the Tugboat that helps other ships when they cannot move on their own. Next is the Sailboat. “Sailboats are patient. They wait for the wind to blow their sails and move them in the right direction. If it’s a windy day, they’ll sail away!”

Cargo Ships are the strong movers of the sea that transport goods from place to place and country to country. The crews of Fishing Boats catch delicious food for us to eat. They have lots of equipment on board to bring fish in. The Aircraft Carrier’s so large, they are “like floating airports” where planes take off and land. Some boats even move underwater. These are Submarines. “Submarines are sneaky…. Shhhhh, they’re hiding!”

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon.

A long time ago wooden Clipper Ships sailed the seas carrying goods and even pirates. Today, they are  as “floating classrooms.” These Research Vessels “are made for studying different parts of the ocean so that we can understand more about fish or plants or the bottom of the sea.” Many people like to spend their vacation on the water on a Cruise Ship. These enormous ships are like little cities, with bedrooms, restaurants, pools, games, and places to relax.”

Readers also learn about Car Carriers, Ferries, Oil Tankers, Police Boats, Rescue Boats, and Diving Boats. Each boat also flies a maritime flag so that children can learn which ones mean yes and no, signal left and right turns, warn of fishing nets or divers in the water, direct others to stop and listen, say Hello, warn of dangerous cargo, indicate the boat is not moving, signal reversing, tell other boats to stop, and tells that the boat will soon be leaving port.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon.

Sara Gillingham’s welcoming and conversational descriptions will excite kids who love modes of transportation and/or the sea as they learn a few facts about each boat. Her engaging rhythm and well-chosen vocabulary will appeal to a wide range of readers. The text elevates her target audience, understanding toddlers’ and preschoolers’ thirst for learning. After reading Boats Are Busy, kids are sure to happily recognize different boats and be able to recount their new knowledge. Gillingham’s boldly colored pages spotlight each boat with realistic details that clearly show young readers its shape and purpose. Crew members and passengers working and enjoying each vessel also demonstrate the scale of the boats.

Docking Boats Are Busy on home or classroom bookshelves will delight little ones. This sturdy board book also makes a terrific take-along for the beach and other outings.

Ages 2 – 5

Phaidon, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714876719

Discover more about Sara Gillingham, her books, and her art on her website.

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

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Tugs to the Rescue! Matching Puzzle

 

The ships below need help. Match each tug to a ship in this printable Tugs to the Rescue! Matching Puzzle?