August 19 – World Photography Day

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About the Holiday

Photography is all about providing information through images. A picture really can be worth a thousand words in capturing a moment of surprise, joy, danger, or sadness. Well-placed photographers, videographers, and cinematographers have given voice to some of society’s pivotal moments, allowing the whole world to witness change, sometimes as it happens. Today we celebrate the “art, craft, science, and history of photography,” as well as those photographers who often put themselves in danger to get the story as well as those who bring us much-needed lighter moments. To learn more visit the World Photography Day website.

Hector: A Boy, a Protest, and the Photograph that Changed Apartheid

By Adrienne Wright

This powerfully emotional book opens with a recollection by Sam Nzima, the photojournalist who captured this pivotal event and a brief history of South Africa and the segregation and governmental restrictions that led up to the protest in 1976 which resulted in Hector Zolile Pieterson’s death. The compelling story, illustrated in graphic novel style, is broken up into three “chapters.”

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Copyright Adrienne Wright, 2019, courtesy of Page Street Kids.

The first introduces Hector, a twelve-year-old boy who loved playing soccer, watching movies, and visiting family. After his normal weekend chores, Hector would run errands for his neighbors to make a little money. Hector was happy, but things were changing at his school. The government had passed a law that instead of the international language English, black students must be taught half of their subjects in Afrikaans, a language derived from Dutch and spoken by descendants of the early Dutch settlers. This “added hardship to students and teachers in an already oppressive education system.” As he counted the money he’d made, his mother reminds him to count in Afrikaans, since that is what will be required in school.

On June 14, 1976 Hector visited his granny Mma. When he left, she gave him some money for his mother. On the way home, he was waylaid by men trying to steal the money. Hector was able to escape with the money and decides not to worry his Mma by telling her. On June 16, Hector heads off to school, but when he gets there, he sees the students “chanting and singing” as they all march toward Orlando Stadium to protest the new Afrikaans law. “More students join in, and soon hundreds, then thousands of people are marching. Hector is swept up in the excited activity of the growing crowd.”

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Copyright Adrienne Wright, 2019, courtesy of Page Street Kids.

Ahead on the road the protesters see the police and a blockade. The students begin marching down another street. They wave signs and sing the “government-banned anthem, ‘Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrica’—’God Bless Africa.’” The police confront the students, blowing their whistles, shouting, and throwing tear gas. Suddenly, Hector hears his sister, Antoinette’s voice warning him to run home. Shots ring out.

The second chapter introduces Antoinette, who on June 16 is leaving for school from Granny Mma’s house. She knows about the planned protest but says nothing to Granny Mma. She joins the crowd waving signs and chanting. Then “POW! Tear gas explodes in the air. Students scatter in all directions,” and Antoinette sees Hector. As they run for cover, they become separated. Shots ring out all around them. When the smoke dissipates, Antoinette sees a teenager running towards a car with a boy in his arms. “She can’t see the child’s face, but when she sees his shoe…”

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Copyright Adrienne Wright, 2019, courtesy of Page Street Kids.

Chapter three takes readers behind the lens of Sam Nzima’s camera. On assignment for The World newspaper, Sam is documenting the protest through his photographs. “The protest begins. / The students march. / Sam snaps photos…. / The police barricades go up. / The children sing. / Sam snaps photos. / The police shoot! / Sam snaps.”

The police see Sam taking pictures and confiscate his film. But Sam has hidden the most important roll in his sock. “His picture of Hector, Antoinette, and another student runs on the front page of the newspaper.” At Granny Mma’s house, Hector’s family grieves his loss; around the world “Hector lives on as a compelling symbol of the cost of apartheid and the change sparked by students that day.”

The final spread shows the black-and-white photograph of Mbuyisa Makhubu carrying Hector with Antoinette running alongside. Back matter includes a short discussion that expands on the events of June 16, 1976 and the years that followed in the fight against Apartheid. An Author’s Note; short biographies of Hector, Antoinette, Sam Nzima, and Mbuyisa Makhubu; and a glossary also follow the story.

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Copyright Adrienne Wright, 2019, courtesy of Page Street Kids.

Adrienne Wright’s gripping storytelling and evocative illustrations go hand-in-hand to present a full portrait of young Hector, his life, his sweet nature, and his dreams. His family’s close bonds and their concern for each other is evident in the dialog that accompanies images of Hector playing, helping Mma and Granny Mma, running errands, and interacting with his sisters. As June 16 dawns, Wright sketches a normal day, with Hector joking with his mother at home and his friend on the way to school.

As it did for Hector, the protest comes as a surprise for readers, sweeping them up into the action just as Hector was. Antoinette’s chapter is the shortest but gripping in its pacing that mirrors the turmoil of the day and her tragedy. As readers enter Sam’s viewpoint, they see, blocked off in vertical and horizontal frames, the pictures of celebrating and happy, yet serious students marching to make a difference. The moment of the shot is seen through Sam’s lens and clouded in smoke.

Wright’s use of overlapping storylines as she transitions from Hector’s account to Antoinette’s and then to Sam’s adds to the tension, drawing readers in and reinforcing their understanding of the atmosphere and what the students were protesting. The final, nearly full-page reproduction of the actual photograph is an unflinching look at the reality of that day, what it stands for, and its personal cost.

A profound narrative for teaching children about South African history, the costs of discrimination, and the personal stories involved in any conflict, Hector is an important book to add to school and public library collections.

Ages: The book is targeted for children from eight to twelve, but adults should be mindful of the maturity and sensitivity of readers. Hector would also be a compelling inclusion in middle school and even early high school social studies and history classes.

Page Street Kids, 2019 | ISBN 978-1624146916

To learn more about Adrienne Wright and her work, visit her website.

World Photography Day Activity

CPB - New Professionals Picture

News Professionals Clothespin Figures

 

Photojournalists and journalists cover the news and sometimes put themselves in danger to bring readers true stories of events happening around the world. With this craft, you can make these clothespin figures that honor the men and women who work to keep us all informed.

Supplies

Directions

  1. Draw a face and hair on the clothespin
  2. Cut out the clothes you want your journalist or photographer to wear
  3. Wrap the clothes around the clothespin. The slit in the clothespin should be on the side.
  4. Tape the clothes together
  5. Cut out the camera
  6. Tape one end of a short length of thread to the right top corner of the camera and the other end of the thread to the left corner. Now you can hang the camera around the figure’s neck.

Idea for displaying the figures

  • Attach a wire or string to the wall and pin the figure to it
  • Pin it to your bulletin board or on the rim of a desk organizer

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You can find Hector: A Boy, a Protest, and the Photograph that Changed Apartheid at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 21 – World Anthropology Day

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About the Holiday

World Anthropology Day was established as a day when anthropologists around the globe can celebrate and share their discipline with students and others interested in the world around us. What is anthropology? The short answer would be: the study of what makes us human. And what does this entail? That answer is much longer and includes the things people do, what we eat, what we wear, the way we communicate, and even such subjects as economics, health, education, law, and genetics. It studies the past but also looks to the future. The field of Anthropology and one of its subsets archaeology are endlessly fascinating. To learn more about Anthropology and careers in the field, find podcasts, and learn about resources, visit the American Archaeological Association Website

This Is How We Do It: One Day in the Lives of Seven Kids from around the World

By Matt Lamothe

 

Opening the book, readers are introduced to the seven children they will learn more about. From Codrignano, Italy comes eight-year-old Romeo who lives in a house with a vineyard in the back. Nine-year-old Kei is from Japan, and she lives in a house in Tokyo. Daphine is seven and lives in Uganda in a “house made of wood and mud in the village of Kanyawara. Eight-year-old Oleg lives in an apartment in Uchaly, Russia, “a mining town near the Ural mountains.” From Los Naranjos, Peru comes Ribaldo, who’s eleven and lives in a house his father built. Ananaya is eight and lives in an apartment in Haridwar, India, which is near the Ganges River. And from Gorgan, Iran comes Kian, who’s seven and who also lives in an apartment.

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Copyright Matt Lamothe, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Each child lives with their mom and dad and various siblings. The largest family is Ribaldo’s; he has two younger brothers and a younger sister who still live at home. He also has four older siblings who don’t live at home anymore. When they go to school, four of the children wear uniforms and three choose their own outfits. Breakfast may be different for each child—with foods such as cheese, fried rice, plantains, eggs, bread and fish on the menus—but every morning starts out delicious.

After breakfast, it’s time to go to school. Kei walks along neighborhood streets in Tokyo, while Ribaldo and his sister and brothers walk along the main road, “sometimes stopping to buy a snack of sweet bread from a fruit stand.” Kian rides with his mother or father through the city, and Ananaya is driven to school through busy streets “past hotels, shops, and cows that freely roam the roads.” Romeo takes a school bus, and Daphine must walk a half-hour on a path that meanders past “groves of eucalyptus and banana trees.”

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Copyright Matt Lamothe, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Each child enjoys learning different subjects with their friends. Ribaldo’s school in Peru is small, so the fifth and sixth graders study together in the same room, and in Russia Oleg has the same teacher and classmates from first through fourth grades. There’s time for lunch and then, after school, it’s time to play. Daphine likes to jump rope, Romeo and his friends have stone-throwing contests, and Ananaya plays “Rumaal Chor or ‘Hanky Thief’” in the part with her friends. Kei gets together with her friends at the neighborhood playground and plays “Koori Oni, or ‘Freeze Tag.’” Oleg is on a hockey team and practices almost every day.

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Copyright Matt Lamothe, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Each child also helps around the house doing chores, tending the garden, feeding pets, and other jobs. Dinner is eaten with siblings and parents. Some families eat around 6:00 or 7:00, while others don’t eat until 9:00 or 10:00. After dinner, the kids engage in various activities: Oleg plays chess with his dad, Ananaya plays the board game Carrom with her sister, Kei reads mysteries with her mom, and Romeo and his dad build model cars. Then it’s time to go to sleep in their own comfortable bed underneath the same night sky.

Back matter includes photographs of the families that Matt Lamothe followed in writing this book as well as a glossary of words found throughout the text. The endpapers contain a world map that shows where each child lives. Author’s notes provide insight into the text and his own experiences in researching the book.

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Copyright Matt Lamothe, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Matt Lamothe’s fascinating look at the lives of seven children from diverse countries of the world will captivate young readers. The snapshots of the children’s lives from breakfast to bedtime spotlight the subjects that kids are most interested in as they wonder what other children eat, what they wear, how they get to school and what they study, how they play, and what their bedtime routines are. In his straightforward text, Lamothe shows that children around the world are more similar than different with traditions that the readers themselves may share.

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Copyright Matt Lamothe, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Lamothe’s colorful illustrations clearly depict food and clothing, neighborhoods and landscapes, classrooms and playtime, families and homes. Children will want to linger over the pages to take in all the details. His portrayals of kids in action at school, at home, and at play will have readers excitedly pointing out, “I do that!” “We eat that!” and wanting to try some of the things that are new as well.

A thought-provoking book to spark stimulating conversations among kids about their world, This Is the Way We Do It is a book to dip into again and again at home and in the classroom.

Ages 5 – 12

Chronicle Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1452150185

To learn more about Matt Lamothe, his books, and his art, visit his website.

World Anthropology Day Activity

Hello, Friends! Word Search Puzzle

 

Saying “hello” to our friends and those we meet is something people do all around the world. Find the word for “Friend” in twenty-five languages in this printable puzzle.

Hello, Friends! Word Search Puzzle | Hello, Friends! Word Search Solution

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You can find This Is How We Do It: One Day in the Lives of Seven Kids from Around the World at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Books