February 25 – It’s Bake for Family Fun Month

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About the Holiday

During the month of February, family and friends are encouraged to get together and have fun baking. Making sweet treats and savory dishes that come out hot and delicious from the oven is a wonderful way to spend time together, try new recipes, and learn new skills. This month is also a great time to explore foods and cuisine from other countries!

Chow Mein and Potstickers

Written by Liselotte Schippers | Illustrated by Monique van den Hout

 

A little boy named Chan has just moved here from China and is hoping to make new friends. He tells a little about himself: “I moved to this country with my father, / my mother and my sister. / My mother is starting a new job here. / She’s an astronaut and someday she’ll go to the moon!” He reveals that his favorite food is potstickers and chow mein. He’s just about to go door-to-door to meet his neighbors. He wonders if kids here like to play and how “things work around here.”

Next door at Number 6, Chan meets Mila, who is from Bosnia. Chan thinks “she looks like a princess from a country far away.” Chan and Mila play soccer until they “get tired and hungry!” Then they eat Mila’s “favorite dish / Bosnian ćevapĉići—rolls of ground / meat.” At the end of the day, they say goodbye: “‘Zàijiàn!’” and “‘Doviđenja!’”

The next day Chan meets Rani, who was born in Indonesia. Even though Rani is younger, Chan says that “you can tell he is very wise. / Rani’s father is a famous musician. / He has to travel a lot, touring with his band. / His mother works at the hospital and helps people who are sick.” Rani shows Chan how to play marbles. Afterward, they enjoy Rani’s “favorite foods: satay and kroepoek. / That’s meat on a stick and shrimp crackers.” Later, they wave good-bye and say: “‘Zàijiàn!’” and “‘Sampai jumpa!’”

Across the street lives a little girl named Jamila, who is originally from Afghanistan. “‘Salaam!’” she greets Chan. Jamila plays the guitar, and the two sing and dance along. Chan says: “After a while we get tired and hungry. / Jamila and I eat Afghan qabuli—rice and lamb. / That brings us to the end of our day. / As we wave good-bye, we say: “‘Zàijiàn!’” and “‘Khodahafez!’”

Twins Kim and Coen live at Number 10. They are from Belgium. “Their father is a master chocolatier. That means he / makes fancy chocolates. When he is working, the house / smells wonderful. / Their mother sells the chocolates in a  / special shop. We get to try some. I’ve never tasted / anything so delicious!” After roller skating, they eat frietjes, which are like French fries served with mayonnaise. “‘Zàijiàn!’” and “‘Tot ziens!’”

In the tall yellow house next to the church on Chan’s street, Chan meets Basu, who came here from South Africa. His mother is a minister and his father is a fireman. Chan thinks that maybe he’d like to be a fireman too when he grows up. “Basu loves to paint and draw.” He and Chan “get busy with brushes, paints and pens.” When their “masterpiece is finished,” Chan says, “We have paint splatters on our clothes and in our hair!” All that creating has made them “tired and hungry.” They “eat South African bobotie… / a dish made with seasoned ground meat.” Before Chan goes home, the boys say:  “‘Zàijiàn!’” and “‘Totsiens!’”

Chan is excited to discover that his street is full of other children to play with. In other homes live Ania from Poland, Nuray from Turkey, Clifton from Suriname, Gracy from England, and Nino from Italy. On one special day, Chan invites all of his new friends to go to the playground with him, and Chan’s father brings chow mein and potstickers for everyone to enjoy. At the end of the day, the air rings with each child’s special way of saying “good-bye.”

Liselotte Schippers free verse poetry opens the door to a world of children for young readers. Each poem gives children the kind of information they want to know about kids from around the world. What do they like to do? What are their families like? What do they eat? Every poem includes the words “hello” and “good-bye” in the native language of the child as well as a favorite dish from each country. Little Chan makes a delightful and enthusiastic tour guide to his multicultural neighborhood, and shows young readers that even though people may come from different countries, their dreams, desires, games, and even jobs are the same. The country that Chan has moved to is never named, making “here” everywhere.

Monique van den Hout’s beautiful illustrations combine the ethereal with realistic portrayals of the happy, bright-eyed children that Chan meets in his neighborhood. Each poem is presented on a two-page spread in which Chan and his new friend are surrounded by colorful images of symbols from that child’s native country. Following each poem, a short dictionary defines and gives a pronunciation guide to the greetings and food introduced.

Chow Mein and Potstickers is an enticing introduction to the global community for children. Each poem could be used to spark more discovery about the countries presented and their children. The book’s inclusion of languages and foods makes it a perfect addition to school, classroom, and homeschool libraries for social studies units as well as a fun book for personal bookshelves.

Ages 4 and up

Clavis, 2017 | ISBN 978-1605373287

Discover more about Liselotte Schippers and her books on her website.

Learn more about Monique van den Hout, her books, and her art on her website.

Bake for Family Fun Month Activity

celebrate-pictureb-books-picture-book-review-Kids-Baking-Cake-in-Cooking-Show-Bakery-Coloring-Pages

Let’s Bake Together Coloring Page

 

It’s fun for friends to create new recipes or just cook up some favorite treats! Have fun with this printable Let’s Bake Together Coloring Page!

Picture Book Review

February 24 – It’s National Haiku Writing Month

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About the Holiday

Great things come in small packages, right? Just look at the amazing kiddos in your family! It’s the same with poetry! The haiku may be the smallest form of poetry, but it packs in huge heart and emotion. Traditionally written to express awe at the natural world, haiku now touches on every subject with its poignancy. Poets the world over have designated this month to create new haiku, improve their art, and share their work. To celebrate this month, try your hand at writing haiku and introduce your littlest readers to these little verses.

Guess Who, Haiku

Written by Deanna Caswell | Illustrated by Bob Shea

 

Down on the farm the animals are playing games and they invite readers to join in the fun! Combining poetry with a guessing game, this cute book introduces younger children to haiku. On each page an animal presents a riddle about another animal in the form of a haiku. When readers turn the page, they discover the answer to the riddle as well as another one to solve.

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Image copyright Bob Shea, text copyright Deanna Caswell. Courtesy of Harry N. Abrams Books

As morning dawns the first haiku reveals: “new day on the farm / muffled mooing announces / a fresh pail of milk.” Then kids are asked, “Can you guess who from this haiku?” Flipping the page, kids see a smiling cow who in turn has a haiku for them: “flower visitors / busy buzzing in the field / black and yellow stripes.”

Other animals familiar to kids—a horse, bird, fish, mouse, cat, dog, and this guy: “from a lily pad / keen eyes spy a careless fly / a sticky tongue—SNAP!”— also puzzle over each other from page to page. The final haiku describes an animal like no other: “two hands hold a book / guessing animals’ puzzles / written in haiku.” Who can it be? Kids will giggle and beam when they discover that they too are in the book!

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Image copyright Bob Shea, text copyright Deanna Caswell. Courtesy of Harry N. Abrams Books

Deanna Caswell’s Guess Who, Haiku is a fun way to get kids interacting with poetry and the very accessible haiku form. Her clever riddles contain lovely images and lyrical alliteration that make these poems as enjoyable to read as they are to hear.

Bob Shea’s animals are adorably illustrated on vibrant solid-colored backgrounds, and each haiku is accompanied by an image that helps kids guess the answer to the riddle. The text and illustrations work together to make Guess Who, Haiku a wonderful way to spend time with kids—who, after reading, may want to make up some poems of their own!

Ages 3 – 6

 Harry N. Abrams, 2016 | ISBN 978-1419718892

Check out a gallery of work by Bob Shea on his website!

National Haiku Writing Month Activity

CPB - Animal Matching Cards

Animal Pairs Matching Game

 

You can have fun testing your powers of guessing with this cute Animal Pairs Matching Game!

Supplies

Directions

  1. Print the Animal Pairs Cards, print two pages to have double cards. To make the game more difficult print 3 or more pages to find 3 or more groups of matching animals
  2. Color the cards
  3. Cut out the cards
  4. Lay the cards face down on a table in random order
  5. Turn over cards to look for matching pairs
  6. When you find a matching pair leave the cards face up
  7. Continue playing until you find all the matching animal pairs or groups

Picture Book Review

February 23 – National Tile Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was established just last year and celebrates that architectural accent that has given exteriors and interiors pizazz and individuality since ancient times. Made in nearly every color, pattern, and shape imaginable, tiles were once all handmade and available only to the wealthy few. Innovations during the Industrial Revolution allowed tile to be mass produced and, thus, affordable to many. Tile has become a favorite decoration in homes across the world—as any HGTV viewer knows!

The World Is Not a Rectangle: A Portrait of Architect Zaha Hadid

By Jeanette Winter

 

Growing up in Iraq, Zaha Hadid sees the way rivers brake up the marshland, watches when the wind sculpts sand dunes, and visits the ruins of ancient cities. At home in Baghdad, young Zaha studies the patterns of her Persian carpet, noticing “how the shapes and colors flow into each other, like the dunes and rivers and marshes” and dreaming of designing her own cities.

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Copyright Jeanette Winter, 2017, courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

In her room, she arranges and rearranges the furniture, creates her own clothes, and comes up with ideas. When Zaha grows up, she moves to London to study to be an architect. After graduation, she opens an office in an old school building—Studio 9. Zaha is joined by some friends and they work tirelessly on their architectural drawings.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-world-is-not-a-rectangle-ruins

Copyright Jeanette Winter, 2017, courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

“Zaha’s designs don’t look like other designs. Her buildings swoosh and zoom and flow and fly. ‘The world is not a rectangle’” she says. But Zaha cannot find anyone to build her designs; everyone says they are impossible. Finally, one of Zaha’s designs is chosen from among all the others in a competition. When it is presented to the city’s committee, however, they reject it. Another competition is held, and Zaha’s design wins again. The city rejects it again. Zaha is as strong as her name Hadid, which means iron in Arabic, and she continues to design plan after plan.

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Copyright Jeanette Winter, 2017, courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Then one by one her plans are accepted. She “remembers the grasses in the marshes swaying” and designs tall towers “dancing like grass.” In the desert, she creates a building that allows the wind to blow over and around and through it. The sports stadium she imagines has the beauty of a cocoon. Remembering the stones in a stream, Zaha “builds an opera house like the pebbles in the water. Inside the opera house, a singer is the pearl in the oyster shell.”

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Copyright Jeanette Winter, 2017, courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

The swirling stars in far-away galaxies inspire a complex of connected buildings, and the undulating waves become the model for a bridge that seems to move with the water. From looking at the Alps, Zaha fashions a museum built “inside a mountain peak with windows to see the sky and the valleys” and a ski jump that “reaches to the sky like the mountain.” From the “jungle and ancient wood temples,” Zaha draws inspiration for “a wooden building to remember a faraway war.”

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Copyright Jeanette Winter, 2017, courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

With every building, Zaha gets busier and busier more than four hundred architects are working in that old school building, “designing, planning, engineering, and making models of Zaha’s visions.” But Zaha’s ideas don’t stop at buildings. She believes “you should do what you like,” so she designs doll houses, shoes, chairs, sculpture, and benches. No matter what she designs, Zaha’s early memories return. She thinks of “the beauty of the landscape—where sand, water, reeds, birds, buildings, and people all somehow flow together” and never loses her belief in the impossible.

Even though the light in Zaha’s office is now dark, “her architects keep their lights on—designing, planning, engineering, and making models of her visions, keeping her flame blazing bright.”

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Copyright Jeanette Winter, 2017, courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Following the text, readers can learn the name and location of each building, discover more information about Zaha Hadid’s life and awards, and read more of her own words about her work.

Jeanette Winter shines a light on an architect who will inspire children not only with her work but with her original ideas, self-confidence, and refusal to compromise on her beliefs. Winter combines straightforward passages of Zaha’s childhood and early professional struggles with lyrical phrasing that describes her influences in nature and her soaring buildings. Sprinkled throughout are Zaha’s own words that define her ideas and ideals.

In her dreamlike illustrations, Winter clearly depicts Zaha Hadid’s inspirations and the way in which she interpreted each natural motion, shape, or phenomenon in steel, glass, concrete, or wood. Winter’s pages swirl, shimmer, flow, and soar, and Zaha is always there, seeing, thinking, envisioning, and drawing.

An excellent biography of a strong and creative woman who has designed some of the world’s most beautiful and original buildings, The World Is Not a Rectangle: A Portrait of Architect Zaha Hadid would be a superb addition to classroom discussions and home story times.

Ages 5 – 10

Beach Lane Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481446693

National Tile Day Activity

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I (Heart) Tiles! Coloring Page

 

With colorful tiles you can make beautiful pictures. Put your imagination to work and color this I (Heart) Tiles! Coloring Page!

Picture Book Review

February 22 – World Yoga Day

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About the Holiday

World Yoga Day was the idea of Samira Radsi, a yoga teacher from Berlin, Germany, who believed that harnessing the power of yogis worldwide could help the victims of human rights violations. With help from her friend, Bjoern Wyrich, a fellow yoga teacher, she contacted yoga schools across the globe and received positive responses from hundreds of schools. Now each year, yoga teachers, schools, students, and yogis around the world donate time, space, and money to human rights causes.

During the time of 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. local time, participating yoga schools hold a session during which everyone devotes all of their thoughts and energy to people who have suffered human rights violations in hope that they will help people feel stronger and more positive. The two-hour time period creates a twenty-four hour yoga marathon of positive energy to support those in need. Any funds raised go to charities that help the victims of injustice. To celebrate, why not seek out a local yoga school or group who is participating in today’s holiday and lend your support?

You Are a Lion! And Other Fun Yoga Poses

By Taeeun Yoo

 

When the bright, early sun begins to warm the garden, “children all gather / Namaste to the morning.” If you sit back on your heels with your hands on your knees and your tongue sticking out, what are you? “You are a…Lion / King of the jungle / Roaring so loud / Make the woods rumble.”

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Copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2012, courtesy of Nancy Paulson Books.

Now, sit up straight and press the bottoms of your feet together while you hold your toes and flap your knees. What are you? “You are a… Butterfly” Feel the breeze as you stretch your wings and flit through the air. What would you be if you stood and bent to touch the ground in front of your feet? You’d be a dog… “Stretch in the sun / Bark at your friend / Ready for fun.”

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Copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2012, courtesy of Nancy Paulson Books.

Next try this! Lie on your stomach with your hands near your shoulders and push up. Do you feel like a…Snake? “In the cool grass / Slither and glide / Make a big hiss.” Ready for another one? Great! Crouch down with your feet flat on the floor and your hands on the ground in front of you and hop. You know what you are! A frog!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-you-are-a-lion-and-other-fun-yoga-poses-cat

Copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2012, courtesy of Nancy Paulson Books.

If you kneel down on all fours put your head down and arch your back, do you feel like a…Cat? “Frisky at night / Mew to the moon / Play till it’s light.” Then stand tall with your palms together and your arms stretched high over your head. You’re a mountain, “solid and mighty / Touching the sky.” Finally, lie down on the ground and slowly breathe as you listen to the silence. “Namaste to each other.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-you-are-a-lion-mountain

Copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2012, courtesy of Nancy Paulson Books.

Taeeun Yoo’s charming illustrations of a diverse group of children sitting, standing, lying, and crouching in simple yoga positions give way to lush imaginative scenes as the child assumes the personality and traits of the animals in each particular yoga pose. Accompanying these scenes are three-line verses of four syllables each that offer cheerful, spirited descriptions of each animal and make You Are a Lion! as much a picture poetry book as a yoga book.

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Copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2012, courtesy of Nancy Paulson Books.

 A little girl relaxes in a gold and white field of daisies as the breeze ruffles her ponytails and butterflies flutter around her. A friendly puppy, nose to nose with a little boy, wags his tail, ready to run and leap. A long, coral-colored snake winds through the deep woods, showing a little girl how to demonstrate a regal presence, and a little boy stakes out his spot on a lily pad as frogs hop, leap, and swim among the reeds. As night falls, a girl follows a cat bounding along the strong branch of a tree under a full moon, and a mountain range of children stand tall, each one accompanied by their animal.

You Are a Lion! is a sweet way to introduce yoga to young children as a playful and healthy activity. For families or classrooms who want to entice young children to participate in this nurturing relaxation method, the book would be a welcome addition to their bookshelves.

Ages 3 and up

Nancy Paulson Books, Penguin, 2018 | Board book edition, ISBN 978-0525515128 | Hardcover, 2012 ISBN 978-0399256028

Discover more about Taeeun Yoo, her books, and her art on her website.

World Yoga Day Activity

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Yoga Alphabet Coloring Pages

 

It’s fun to match yoga poses with letters of the alphabet! Grab your crayons and enjoy these yoga-inspired coloring pages then do the poses!

D is for Dog | K is for Kite | W is for Waterfall

Picture Book Review

February 21 – It’s National Bird-Feeding Month

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About the Holiday

Spring comes early for our feathered friends. You may have noticed more bird activity in the past few weeks as birds get ready to build nests and mate. February can be a tough month for these little creatures, though. In some places snow still covers the ground, and the spring blooms that offer nutrition haven’t sprouted yet. To remedy this situation, in 1994 John Porter read a resolution into the United States’ Congressional record recognizing February as National Bird-Feeding Month. One-third of the American population have backyard feeders that provide the sustenance birds need to survive. To celebrate, if you have feeders make sure they are well stocked. If you don’t have a feeder in your yard, consider hanging one. Enjoying the beauty and songs of birds is a day brightener!

Warbler Wave

By April Pulley Sayre with Jeff Sayre

 

“In spring, as you nightly nap, / warblers flap / over oceans, lakes, / and mountains.” These tiny birds ride on streams of wind, navigating their way around buildings and towers and sharing space with bats, insects, and other birds. Then, nearly out of energy, they alight to rest and look for food.

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Copyright April Pulley Sayre, 2018. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

“They search. Stalk. / Wag. Walk. / So dainty, / these colorful diners.” They’re dots of color and intricate patterns among the leaves and “flit, like flying flowers.” They look and listen then dart to capture dinner. They are “crushers of caterpillars! / Slurpers of spiders!” Insects can hide from these clever hunters that know every nook and cranny to search.

And they’re not above nabbing a snack that a spider has so carefully wrapped. After a meal, “warblers sing. / Preen. / Scan the local scene.” But then as soon as nighttime falls, they’re off again, with miles to go until they reach their nesting grounds. Like good friends, they keep in touch with each other in the darkness as they fly “Surfing rivers of wind way up high…calling zeep, zeep, zeep in the sky.”

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Copyright April Pulley, 2018. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

Following the lyrical text, an extensive discussion of the “Migration Marathon” warblers take each spring reveals fascinating facts about the birds, their instinct to migrate, and why and how they migrate as well as the role of science in recording warbler migration. For instance, warblers weigh no more than a couple of baby carrots, yet they fly hundreds, sometimes thousands of miles from their winter homes in the southern hemisphere to their summer homes in the northern United States and Canada.

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Copyright April Pulley Sayre, 2018. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

Blackpoll warblers even undergo physical changes in preparation for their 4,000-mile journey taken three days at a time nonstop. And how do these tiny creatures find their way? They’re born with an innate knowledge of the direction they need to fly, and they navigate by the stars, the setting sun, and the earth’s magnetic field (which they may be able to see!). There’s much more to discover here, too, about the lovely warblers that may be flying through your area soon.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-warbler-wave-looking-for-bugs

Copyright April Pulley Sayre, 2018. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

April Pulley Sayre’s poetic narrative of the astounding migration warblers undertake every year is as bright and spry as her little subjects. Staccato sentences echo the birds’ quick, sure movements and alertness to the sounds and motions around them while longer passages flow with the rhythm of the birds in flight, soaring to the next stopping place and taking off again for home.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-warbler-wave-taking-off-again

Copyright April Pulley Sayre, 2018. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com

Gorgeous photographs of a fiery horizon and rising moon that invite warblers to the air each night open the book and lead to lush, close-up views of a variety of warblers in their regal colors and patterns. Their sharp eyes, attentive expressions, and perky personalities are on full display in their native habitat. As dusk descends once more over sea and forest, the warblers take wing while birdwatchers wait to see them.

For children who are bird lovers and for families who have backyard feeders or enjoy taking bird-watching walks, as well as for classroom science and story times, Warbler Wave is a beautiful addition to home, classroom, school, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 8 and up

Beach Lane Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1481448291

To learn more about April Pulley Sayre her books, and her work, visit her website.

National Bird-Feeding Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pine-cone-bird-feeder

Pine Cone Bird Feeder

 

You don’t need a fancy bird feeder to help out the birds in your backyard. With a pine cone, birdseed, and a bit of peanut butter, lard, or vegetable shortening, you can make feeders that birds will flock to!

Supplies

  • Item to Cover, such as a pine cone, conical ice-cream cone, piece of toast or stale bread, bagel, paper towel or toilet paper tube
  • Peanut butter, lard, or vegetable shortening
  • Bird seed
  • String or wire for hanging
  • Large bowl or container
  • Knife for spreading

Directions

  1. Attach the string or wire to the item to be covered
  2. Cover the item with peanut butter, lard, or vegetable shortening
  3. Pour birdseed into a large bowl or container
  4. Roll the covered item in the birdseed until well covered
  5. Hang your homemade bird feeder!

Picture Book Review

February 20 – Love Your Pet Day

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About the Holiday

Whether you have a dog or cat, hamster or fish, parakeet, iguana, or llama, your pet is one of the most loved parts of your family. Animals’ funny antics, eager personalities, and unconditional love simply make life better. Today’s holiday encourages you to spend more time with your pet. A longer walk or playtime and a special treat will show your pet how much they mean to you. If you’ve been considering getting a pet, maybe today’s the day. Getting a pet can be life-changing—just as the man in today’s book discovers.

Seed Man

By Aiko Ikegami

 

“One day Seed Man came to town.” After he had dug a hole and chosen a seed from his bag, he planted it and then “called the fairies.” The fairies were very good gardeners. They tended the seed with special food and water and sang to it as it grew from a tiny sprout into a tall sapling and finally into a straight, strong tree.

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Copyright Aiko Ikegami, 2018, courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Among its leafy branches, the tree bore fruit unlike any other. There was a toy bunny, bear, and duckling; a drum and a guitar; and a tricycle, train, and plane. There was even a puppy in a basket. When the fruit was ready, the fairies picked it and “delivered Seed Man’s gifts all over town” to the sleeping residents. “Even if someone didn’t know he needed a gift, Seed Man and the fairies knew.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-seed-man-plants-a-seed

Copyright Aiko Ikegami, 2018, courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

And that is how the man who lived alone with only a photograph of his wife and child to comfort him came to have the dog. When he awoke in his chair, holding the framed picture, he looked at the puppy sitting in her basket in front of him and said, “‘I don’t want a dog.’” As the puppy rolled over and wagged her tail and jumped to greet him, the man said, “‘Ay yi yi.’”  

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-seed-man-calls-fairies

Copyright Aiko Ikegami, 2018, courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

But then the man patted the dog and smiled at her. He poured milk into a bowl, and let the puppy sit on his lap. Everything was going well until a butterfly fluttered through the window and captured the dog’s attention. With a leap and a bound, the puppy chased after it, shaking the table and upsetting the coffee cup, the vase of flowers and the framed photograph.

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Copyright Aiko Ikegami, 2018, courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

They all crashed to the floor, shattered.  “The man looked at the broken picture” and sent the dog away. Later, the sky darkened and rain pelted the window. The man wondered what the puppy would do. He picked up his umbrella and “went to look.” The sidewalks were crowded and he couldn’t see the dog anywhere. But the fairies knew right where to find her. They brought her back to the old man.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-seed-man-fairies-sing

Copyright Aiko Ikegami, 2018, courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

The man was so happy to see her, and she was happy to see her. He picked her up, and she licked his nose. The Seed Man watched the old man and the puppy together and “knew it was time.” The fairies carried the bag of seeds to the old man’s home and knocked on the door. Now a new Seed Man, his puppy, and the fairies are coming to town.

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Copyright Aiko Ikegami, 2018, courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Aiko Ikegami’s enchanting story offers young readers much to consider about the nature of love and its power to broaden horizons and overcome loneliness, fear, and other emotions. For the old man, the companionship of the puppy opens his heart and reopens his eyes to the world around him. Previously focused on his own feelings and sadness, the man finds in the puppy someone else to care about, a compassion that soon extends to others. As Ikagami’s fairies know, each person has unique needs and responds to different inspirations.

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Ikegami’s whimsical illustrations fill in and expand on her story, the simplicity of which cleverly leaves it open to personal interpretations. Discussions may revolve around the gift of talent, how the seed of love grows when well planted and tended, and how the childlike fairies remind us that children are our greatest gift. And then there’s the Seed Man himself. Is he a mystical figure or can he be anyone paying kindness forward?

Ikegami clearly depicts the emotional transformation the old man experiences. At first stooped with sadness, his change of heart when he accepts the puppy comes with smiles and crinkled eyes, and when he is designated as the new Seed Man, his dramatic change in appearance and disposition shows children that love and purpose found lead to a happy life.

For opening discussions about many aspects of love and happiness, Seed Man is an original story that would be a welcome addition to home and classroom bookshelves.

Ages 5 – 8

Sleeping Bear Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-1585363797

Discover more about Aiko Ikegami, her books, and her art on her website.

Love Your Pet Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-wooden-bead-cat-craft

A Little Ball of Kitten

 

This sweet little kitten is easy to make and can keep you company on your desk or shelf! Since every kitten is different, you can make yours to look just the way you want. Here’s how I made mine:

Supplies

  • Wooden ball with a flat bottom, available in craft stores and in different sizes
  • Craft paint in any color kitten you’d like (I used red and yellow and mixed it to make a mottled orange)
  • Craft paint in pink or white for the inner ear
  • Scrap of fleece for the ears. Fleece is easily shaped to the rounded ball and when painted is stiff enough to stand up on its own.
  • Thin, colored wire in several colors for the tail (string or twine, wrapped wire, fleece, stiff paper, and other materials could also be used)
  • Paint brush
  • Permanent marker for making the face
  • Hot glue gun or strong glue

Directions

  1. Paint the wooden ball and let dry
  2. Paint the scrap of fleece to match the wooden ball, let dry
  3. Cut out small triangular shapes for the ears. Round the bottom of the ears slightly so they fit the shape of the ball
  4. If making a tail from several colors of thin wire, twist them together, leaving one end untwisted
  5. With the glue gun or strong glue attach the ears to the top of the head
  6. With the glue gun attach the tail to the back of the wooden ball in the center near the base
  7. With the marker, draw eyes, nose, and mouth for the face and semicircles near the bottom for the paws

Picture Book Review

February 19 – XXIII Olympic Games

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About the Holiday

Today we celebrate all the athletes around the world participating in the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang. While competing against each other and for different countries, each athlete knows the same hard work, determination, courage, and spirit it takes to be a champion. Most of the athletes have dedicated their lives to practicing and perfecting their skills. As today’s book shows, learning a new sport starts with the first step.

Mice Skating

Written by Annie Silvestro | Illustrated by Teagan White

 

“During the cold winter months, most field mice take cover…tunneling deep underground, burrowing into farmhouse walls, nesting in hollow logs.” Lucy was different. She loved to scamper in the snow and feel the frost on her whiskers. Most of all Lucy loved her “fluffy wool hat with the pink pom-pom on top.” Wearing this hat, Lucy was brave and bold. “It made her bloom!” But while Lucy loved everything about winter, her friends only saw Lucy’s freezing fur, dripping nose, and “chedder-ing” teeth.

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Image copyright Teagan White, 2017, text copyright Annie Silvestro, 2017. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

When Lucy invited her friends to go outside with her, they declined, preferring to stay “warm and toasty till spring.” Lucy enjoyed catching snowflakes and making snow angels and snowmice, but she wished she could share the fun with her friends. She tried bringing winter inside, but her snow cones and giant icicles melted, and the indoor snowball fight “was a soggy flop.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mice-skating-winter-indoors

Image copyright Teagan White, 2017, text copyright Annie Silvestro, 2017. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

One day while playing outside, Lucy slipped on an icy puddle. She slid and then “she…soared!” Lucy was hooked. She made ice skates from pine needles and went back to the pond. “At first she wobbled. She fell more than once. But with practice, soon she was ice-skating.” Lucy couldn’t wait to tell her friends, and she had an idea. She gathered supplies,went back home, and got to work. 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mice-skating-lucy

Image copyright Teagan White, 2017, text copyright Annie Silvestro, 2017. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Every day Lucy went skating. When she returned, she went to her room and worked quietly with yarn, thread, and pine needles. Her friends couldn’t help but be curious. They peeked through her door and peppered her with questions. At last Lucy was ready. “She placed a new hat on each mouse’s head. ‘These will keep you warm,’ she said, ‘inside and out.’” Mona, Millie, and Marcello “marveled at their new hats.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mice-skating-friends-outside

Image copyright Teagan White, 2017, text copyright Annie Silvestro, 2017. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Then, with a bag slung over her shoulder, Lucy led her friends outside and to the pond. In front of her dazzled friends, Lucy “spiraled and swirled, swizzled and twizzled, loop-de-looped.” “‘Marvelous!’ cried Mona. ‘Spectacular!’ called Millie. ‘Brie-vissimo!’ cheered Marcello. Suddenly,  they all wanted to try. Lucy opened her bag and handed each one their own pair of skates.

Gingerly, they slid onto the ice. They wobbled and fell. “But with practice, soon they were mice skating.” They squealed and squeaked with joy, and Marcello said, ‘”Who knew winter could be so goud-a?’” “‘I did,’ said Lucy, beaming. And together they bloomed like spring.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mice-skating-lucy-skating (2)

Image copyright Teagan White, 2017, text copyright Annie Silvestro, 2017. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

For one reason or another, it’s sometimes hard to get friends, family, or others to try something new. Sometimes, it’s us that balk a bit at getting out and exploring different opportunities. Annie Silvestro’s cheery story is a sweet and gentle reminder that often fun, exhilaration, and wider horizons are just a few steps away. Silvestro offers some sage advice along with her delightful friendship story as Lucy makes hats and skates for her friends to show them what they’re missing. Readers will love her charming and sprightly adjectives that beautifully depict the cozy home comforts and refreshing outdoor atmosphere of winter, and will giggle at Marcello’s creative cheese—but not cheesy—puns.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mice-skating-lucy

Image copyright Teagan White, 2017, text copyright Annie Silvestro, 2017. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Readers cannot be faulted for maybe wanting to spend winter underground, too, in the homey den Teagan White has fashioned for Lucy and her friends. The penchant of mice to gather bits and bobs here and there is reflected in the thread-spool table, the clothespin shelf for displaying cheese, and the half-pencil rung on a ladder. The mice also use button plates and acorn-top mugs. The fire in the fireplace crackles as acorns and herbs dry on a line above it. Outdoors is just as magical with sparking snowflakes, snowy fields, and red berry accents. White’s full-page illustrations interspersed with pages of circular insets are rendered in muted greens, browns, and pinks that enhance this snug wintertime story.

A sweet friendship story for any time of the year, Mice Skating would be a lovely addition to home and classroom libraries.

Ages 3 and up

Sterling Children’s Book, 2017 | ISBN 978-1454916321

Discover more about Annie Silvestro and her books on her website.

Learn more about Teagan White and view a portfolio of her art on her website.

IIXXX Olympic Games Activity

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We’re Skating! Coloring Page

 

Ice skating is one of winter’s most enjoyable activities! Here’s a printable We’re Skating! Coloring Page to enjoy too!

Picture Book Review