May 18 – International Museum Day

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About the Holiday

Created in 1946, the International Council of Museums established International Museum Day in 1977 to institute an annual event highlighting museums as “important means of cultural exchange, enrichment of cultures and development of mutual understanding, cooperation, and peace among peoples.” The day also aims to unify “the creative aspirations and efforts of museums and draw the attention of the world public to their activity.” Each year a theme is chosen to spotlight a relevant issue. This year’s theme is “Hyperconnected Museums: New approaches, new publics.” With today’s technology, museums have many more ways to share their exhibits and reach new audiences. Museums are also turning their attention to their local diverse communities, creating projects in collaboration with minorities, indigenous peoples, and local institutions. To learn more visit the International Council of Museums website! To celebrate today’s holiday show your support for museums by visiting and/or donating to your favorite museum!

The Museum

Written by Susan Verde | Illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds

 

A lanky young girl enters an art museum and goes right up to an abstract painting of sunlight yellow circles. She says, “When I see a work of art, something happens in my heart.” The painting makes her feel like dancing and leaping, and in front of a painting of a ballerina, the girl lifts up on her toes and raises her arms gracefully.

Van Gogh’s Starry Night makes her “all twirly-whirly” and she spins around like the painting’s swirling winds. She sees off-beat sculptures that inspire her to turn upside down and become a human work of art with bent legs and pointed toes. She sits face to face with The Thinker, contemplating “the whos and whats and wheres and whys.” A woman’s abstract face painted in blues makes her sad, while a plate of apples reminds her she’s hungry.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-museum-coming-to-museum

Image copyright Peter H. Reynolds, 2013, text copyright Susan Verde, 2013. Courtesy of Harry N. Abrams Books for Young Readers.

The girl skips past a wall lined with paintings of flowers, mirrors The Scream, and makes “silly faces at a guy” by Picasso. Paintings of squiggles make her burst out in giggles. But then she sees a wall-sized painting that makes her stop and stare. The canvas is completely blank. She looks long and hard, then shuts her eyes and says, “I start to see things / in my head, / yellow, blue, then green / and red, / circles, lines, all kinds of shapes, / faces, flowers, and landscapes.” The idea of a world that’s hers to fill anyway she wants leaves her elated, and as she walks out the door at the end of the day, the girl is happy and content because, she says, “The museum lives inside of me.”

Through one girl’s trip to a museum Susan Verde celebrates the emotions and dreams that experiencing art can stimulate in visitors. Her jaunty rhymes and conversational rhythm create an atmosphere of active participation for her happy museum-goer as well as for readers, leading them to the realization that not only a canvas, but their life itself, is a unique work of art.

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Image copyright Peter H. Reynolds, 2013, text copyright Susan Verde, 2013. Courtesy of Harry N. Abrams Books for Young Readers.

Peter H. Reynolds’ fluid, uninhibited line drawings are ideally suited to Verde’s inspirational story. As the girl flits, twirls, and skips from gallery to gallery and mimics the paintings and sculpture she sees, readers’ imaginations will also take off, remembering art that they’ve seen and conjuring up some of their own. Reproductions of famous works of art give younger kids a chance to learn about some pieces of world art and allows older children the opportunity to show their knowledge.

A smart and stylish tribute to art museums, the feelings expressed in The Museum are also fitting for any child who finds inspiration in a museum of history, natural science, science, or any discipline. The book makes a beautiful gift, a stirring addition to home bookshelves, and a terrific book to pair with museum trips, art classes, and inspirational story times in any classroom.

Ages 5 – 7 (and up)

Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2013 | ISBN 978-1419705946

Discover more about Susan Verde and her books on her website.

To learn more about Peter H. Reynolds and view a gallery of his books and art, visit his website

World Museum Day Activity

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Museum Exhibit Coloring Page

 

Going to a museum is a terrific family outing! Here’s a printable Museum Exhibit Coloring Page for you to enjoy!

Picture Book Review

May 5 – National Astronaut Day

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About the Holiday

Today we celebrate the astronauts who with their bravery and sense of adventure inspire everyone to “reach for the stars.” The date commemorates the mission of Astronaut Alan Bartlett Shepard Jr., who became the first American in space on May 5, 1961. Aboard the Freedom 7 Space capsule, Shepard took a 15-minute suborbital flight 116 miles into the atmosphere. The stories of astronauts from other missions have—and continue to—spark dreams of adventure in all. Even, and maybe especially,  among the youngest of us!

Otter in Space

By Sam Garton

 

On Sunday Otter goes to the museum with Otter Keeper and Teddy to see the Space Exhibition. They see a Triceratops skeleton and meet a stuffed bear that must be Teddy’s cousin. On the walls are old paintings made before the invention of crayons, and ancient, interesting things are everywhere.

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Copyright Sam Garton, 2015, courtesy of Balzer + Bray.

Otter likes all these exhibits, but her favorite is the room dedicated to outer space—there are buttons to push just like a real astronaut, videos to watch, and a rock that came all the way from the moon. At last Otter gets to go to the gift shop. She loads up her arms with toys, but Otter Keeper says, “One thing only.” The spaceship travels home with them, but Otter and Teddy really want a moon rock too.

The next day while Otter Keeper is at work, Otter and Teddy play with their new spaceship, but it’s just not as fun without a moon rock. Teddy suggests going back to the museum, but no one can drive them. Otter thinks and thinks and suddenly has “the best idea ever!” She and Teddy will blast to the moon and retrieve a moon rock.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-otter-in-space-museum-exhibits

Copyright Sam Garton, 2015, courtesy of Balzer + Bray.

Otter makes a very important list of very important things to do. After lunch she builds two space suits and starts training. Although Teddy has some trouble keeping his space suit on and with problem solving, his performance in anti-gravity training is impressive so they move on to constructing the spaceship. With ingenuity and a bunch of household items, Otter builds a rocket and takes it to the Launchpad.

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Copyright Sam Garton, 2015, courtesy of Balzer + Bray.

With Giraffe at “mishun control” lift-off is easy, but the moon landing is a little bumpy. Otter’s suit gets torn, but she perseveres and discovers the perfect moon rock nearby. It’s huge! With a little trouble Otter and Teddy transport it back to Earth, where it makes a perfect companion, playing board games and pirates—until Otter Keeper comes home and says it has to go back where it belongs.

The discussion is carried over to dinnertime, and Otter Keeper relents when he sees how serious Otter is in her space suit. If Otter cleans the moon rock she can keep it, says Otter Keeper. But one more restriction has been added to the Otter DO NOT list: dig up moon rocks! That’s okay, though. There are other things to dig up on the moon—like a dinosaur!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-otter-in-space-museum-gift-shop

Copyright Sam Garton, 2015, courtesy of Balzer + Bray.

Sam Garton’s Otter in Space is a cute, spot-on portrayal of the fantastic ideas kids get when exposed to new concepts or places. Told from Otter’s point of view, the text hits on the serious-yet-humorous observations of kids: the gift shop as the favorite museum “exhibit,” a lingering regret for the toy left behind, and “the best ideas ever!” to correct situations.

Garton’s colorful illustrations of wily Otter and her faithful Teddy as they visit the museum, plan their space trip with the help of Giraffe and other toys, and blast off wearing a cereal box space suit are endearing. Kids will giggle at Teddy’s anti-gravity training in the washing machine. They and their parents will also appreciate Otter’s crafty discovery of the moon rock in the garden and recognize with a laugh his adoption of it as a member of the family.

Otter in Space is a book kids will want to explore again and again and would make a favorite addition to home bookshelves!

Ages 4 – 8

Balzer + Bray, 2015 | ISBN 978-0062247766

National Astronaut Day Activity

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Out of This World Tic-Tac-Toe Game

 

You can launch your own Tic-Tac-Toe Game with this set you make yourself! With just a couple of egg cartons, some crayons, and a printable game board, you’ll be off to the moon for some fun! Opposing players can be designated by rockets and capsules. Each player will need 5 playing pieces. 

Supplies

  • Printable Moon Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board
  • 2 cardboard egg cartons
  • Heavy stock paper or regular printer paper
  • Crayons
  • Black or gray fine-tip marker

Directions

To Make the Rockets

  1. Cut the tall center cones from the egg carton
  2. Trim the bottoms of each form so they stand steadily, leaving the arched corners intact
  3. Pencil in a circular window on one side near the top of the cone
  4. Color the rocket body any colors you like, going around the window and stopping where the arched corners begin
  5. With the marker color the arched corners of the form to make legs
  6. On the cardboard between the legs, color flames for blast off

To Make the Capsule

  1. Cut the egg cups from an egg carton
  2. Color the sides silver, leaving the curved section uncolored. (If your egg cup has no pre-pressed curve on the sides of the cup, draw one on each side.)
  3. Color the curved section yellow to make windows
  4. With the marker, dot “rivets” across the capsule

Print the Moon Game Board and play!

Picture Book Review

 

 

Picture book review

January 31 – Inspire Your Heart with Art Day

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About the Holiday

Celebrating art is always a great thing! Today we champion that feeling you get inside when you create or experience art—no matter what kind is your favorite. Paintings, books, music, sculpture, quilts, photography, and other arts show you a bit of the world in a new way—a way, perhaps, you’ve never thought of before. Art can inspire, gladden,  sadden, anger, teach, and compel action. Today, let your heart be inspired by art by visiting a museum, bookstore, library, concert, or gallery. Or, if you’re creative, take some time to give your imagination full reign. And what if you’re friends with someone named Art? Well, that’s a lucky thing for today too—as today’s book shows!

Seen Art?

Written by Jon Scieszka | Illustrated by Lane Smith

 

A little boy has arranged to meet his friend Art at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Fifty-third Street in New York City. When he arrives, however, Art isn’t there. The boy asks a woman nearby, “‘Have you seen Art?’” The lady points him in the direction of a beautiful new building further down the street. When he gets there, the boy doesn’t see Art, but he does meet an official-looking gentleman. “‘You seen Art?’” the boy inquires.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

“‘MoMA?” the man asks. The boy remembers that the lady asked the same thing and, figuring it’s some kind of code word, answers, “‘Yes.’” Great news! The building is just opening, the man tells him. After giving a woman at a desk the code word, the boy is led upstairs. The woman stops in front of a painting with blue swirls, writhing trees, and a moon glowing over a quiet village. “‘Can’t you just feel the restlessness? The color? The emotion?’” The boy can feel it, but he’s more interested in finding Art.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

A little man standing nearby seems to know where to go, and he leads the boy through a room filled with more paintings and sculpture. The man stops in front of a painting. “‘Look at that red! Look at that open box of crayons inviting us in. The grandfather clock? It has no hands. Time is suspended.’” The boy sees all this too. But, really, what he wants to know is—“‘is Art here?’”

A little girl across the room knows what he means. She can show him art. She takes him past a fur-covered teacup and spoon to a painting of an eye. But this is no ordinary eye. Instead of blue, brown, or green, this eye is made of clouds. “‘Your dream can be what is real,’” she explains. They see another painting with a melting clock in which time is messed up too, but it’s still not Art.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

Suddenly, a painter hugs the boy for his astute observation. He asks, is art “‘trying to capture dreams? Or is it making images everyone can recognize?’” He presents a painting covered in the letters of the alphabet—or “‘are they something more?’” The boy has to admit that “‘they could be both.’” Next, the boy meets a baby who points out a picture of a brown “‘moo moo’” cow. In fact, in every corner someone is expounding on a painting in front of them: “‘The pain! The mystery!….the constellation of shapes.’”  And there’s the composition, the color, and the atmosphere to consider too.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

But each time the boy answers, “‘Not exactly the Art I was looking for.’” Perhaps, he is interested in the Bell-47D1 helicopter hanging from the ceiling. Is it art? The boy strides past more pieces; they are puzzling, personal, playful, provocative, and powerful. Art is not just paintings, he is told. Finally! They seem to be getting it. He begins to ask one more time about his friend, but then he’s shown photographs, sculpture, objects, and films.

The boy decides he needs to find Art on his own. He discovers a majestic painting as long as two rooms, a slippy-slidey chair, images of soup cans that make him hungry and lead him to the café, and sculptures of a family and a goat. Soon it’s time to leave. Feeling dejected, the boy thinks he’ll never find his friend. “‘Hello, again,’” he hears. It’s the lady he met that morning. “‘Did you find art?’” she asks.

The boy is about to say no, but he remembers everything he has seen. “‘Yes,’” he answers as he walks out the door. And there, he finds Art waiting for him! What else is there do to but go through MoMA again?!

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

Notes on each piece along with thumbnail images follow the text.

With clever word play, a humorous nod to the juxtaposed ideas “I know what I like/I like what I know,” and a wink at the world of art criticism, Jon Scieszka takes readers on a tour of the art collection at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. The simple misunderstanding of the word Art in the story introduces children to the nature of interpretation and the variety of forms it can take. Through the many people the little boy meets, Scieszka presents a fabulous opportunity for adults and children to talk about opinions and how each person can have their own while accepting those of others. Scieszka’s rich language is as enticing as the art presented and gives kids and adults a vast vocabulary to use in talking about what art—and life—has to offer.

Lane Smith’s simple line-drawn and abstract figures are the perfect tour guides to the reproductions of famous paintings, sculpture, installations, and other art found at MoMA. Printed in full, vibrant color, the artwork dazzles, drawing readers in to stop and explore each image. An excellent survey of classic and modern pieces, Seen Art? will delight and fascinate kids and adults.

For art lovers and those just discovering the world of creativity, Seen Art? is an absorbing book that will entice both children and adults to learn more about art. The book would be a welcome addition to home libraries and a fun and engaging addition to school art programs or units.

Ages 3 – 8 and up

Viking Books for Young Readers, 2005 |ISBN 978-0670059867

Discover more about Jon Scieszka, and his books, as well as other fun stuff on his website.

View a gallery of book illustration and other artwork by Lane Smith on his website.

Inspire Your Heart with Art Day Activity

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Rainbow Crayon Art

 

With this cool project you can create an art piece that’s as colorful as a rainbow and as unique as you are! Adult help is needed for children.

Supplies

  • Box of 24 crayons
  • White foam board or thick poster board, 8 inches by 17 inches
  • A small piece of corrugated cardboard, about 5 inches by 5 inches (a piece of the foam board can also be used for this step)
  • A small piece of poster board, about 5 inches by 5 inches
  • Scissors
  • X-acto knife (optional)
  • Hot glue gun
  • Hair dryer
  • Old sheets or towels, newspapers, a large box, or a trifold display board

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celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-rainbow-crayon-craft

Directions

  1. Remove the various red, orange, yellow, blue, indigo, and violet hued crayons from the box of crayons
  2. Strip the paper from the crayons by slicing the paper with the x-acto knife, or removing it by hand
  3. Line them up in order at the top of the white foam board
  4. With the hot glue gun, attach the crayons to the board with their tips facing down 
  5. Cut an umbrella or other shape of your choice from the poster board
  6. Trace the umbrella or other shape onto the corrugated cardboard or a piece of the foam board and cut out
  7. Glue the umbrella or other shape to the foam board, about 4 ½ inches below the crayons, let dry
  8. Set up a space where you can melt the crayons. The wax will fly, so protect the floor and walls by placing the art piece in a large box or by hanging newspapers, old sheets or towels on the walls and placing newspapers on the floor. A trifold display board and newspapers works well.
  9. Stand the art piece upright with the crayons at the top
  10. With the hot setting of the hair dryer, blow air at the crayons until they start to melt
  11. Move the hair dryer gently back and forth across the line of crayons from a distance of about 6 to 12 inches away. The closer you are to the crayons, the more they will splatter.
  12. The crayons will begin to melt and drip downward
  13. You can experiment with aiming the hair dryer straight on or at an angle to mix colors
  14. Wax that drips onto the umbrella or other shape can be chipped off after it dries or wiped off to create a “watercolor” effect on the shape
  15. Once the hair dryer is turned off, the wax cools and dries quickly
  16. Hang or display your art!

Picture Book Review

January 29 – It’s Book Blitz Month

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About the Holiday

Is your motto “So many books, so little time?” Is every shelf, nook, and cupboard in your house filled with books? Is your library card the first one on your ring? If so, you’ll love Book Blitz Month! During this month book lovers are given the green light to read, read, read as many books as possible! Or if there’s a tome you’ve always wanted to tackle, crack the cover and let yourself become immersed in someone else’s story. For kids, Book Blitz Month can be particularly exciting. Sit down with your child or students and make a stack of books they’d like to read. Find time every day to read one, two, or a few of the books in the pile. Seeing the stack shrink gives kids a sense of accomplishment, and they might even want to build it up again! Mix reading with fun activities to encourage a new generation of avid readers!

Fossil by Fossil: Comparing Dinosaur Bones

Written by Sara Levine | Written by T.S Spookytooth

 

You like dinosaurs, right? I mean, who doesn’t? Of course, I’m not talking about those folks with outdated ideas or that old clunker in the garage that you just can’t part with. I’m talking about the big, huge carnivores and herbivores that roamed the earth millions of years ago—parasaurolophus, diplodocus, apatosaurus, brontosaurus, t-rex, and all the rest that have fun-to-say names. You might think that having those guys and gals around now would be fun, but how would you feel if you, yourself, were a dinosaur?

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Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

Does that thought make you laugh or maybe shudder a little? Well, if you were a dinosaur “you might be pretty funny looking. Or even quite scary.” If you think it’s totally impossible that you could be a dinosaur, you might want to reconsider: Sure, “on the outside, people and dinosaurs look very, very different. But on the inside, we’re actually very similar.” Compare some dinosaur fossils and a human skeleton, and you’ll see!

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Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

Dinos have skulls, and—yep—you’ve got one too! Vertebrae and ribs? Dinosaur, check; you, check. How about scapula, humerus, ulna, radius, metacarpals, and phalanges? Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes! And that’s just in our arms and in a dinosaur’s front legs! We both have “hip bones and leg bones and toe bones” too! So why aren’t we dinosaurs? And why aren’t dinosaurs people?

That’s because “dinosaurs had some extra bones in their bodies that made them different from us.” Would you like to try some of these on for size? Imagine having a bony ridge jutting out from the back of your head and two big horns and one littler one jutting out the front? “What kind of dinosaur would you look like then?” You got it! A triceratops! Nowadays all those enhancements would just make it hard to wear a hoodie, but back in the Cretaceous Period? “Scientists think this dinosaur used its horns for fighting.” The frill in the back “probably helped protect a triceratops’s neck and shoulders.”

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Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

This is fun! Let’s try another one…How about if you had “rows of chunky triangle-shaped bones along your back and…an enormous ball of bone stuck onto the end of your vertebrae?” Well, you wouldn’t be a world-class runner and dunking a basketball would probably be out of the question. Why? Because you’d be an ankylosaurus, and the “bones on the end of this dinosaur’s tail weighed more than 60 pounds (27 kg).” You would be a pretty awesome competitor, though—even for the likes of T-rex!

What if those bones along your back ranged from small to huge and ran from your head to the end of your long tail, which, by the way, ended with a few knife-sharp spikes? Then, you’d be a stegosaurus! And what would you do with those plates on your back? Good question! Maybe they’d gather sun like solar panels and keep you warm, or maybe you’d just flash them around to impress your friends.

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Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

Is having more of something ever a bad thing? You might think so if you looked like our next dinosaur. “What if we added lots and lots of extra vertebrae in your neck? And what if your vertebrae didn’t stop at your rear end but kept going and going and going? What kind of dinosaur would you be then?” Here’s a hint: a picture of you wouldn’t even fit on a regular two-page spread in a book! That’s right—it takes four pages to fit you in because you would be a diplodocus! You’d be so long it would take three school buses to get you to class!

From large we move onto small—small arms that is and only two fingers on each hand instead of five. Any ideas? What if I added that “you’d also have dagger-like teeth lining your jaw?” Yeah, you know it! A tyrannosaurus rex! And what did t-rex use those small arms for? “Scientists think it might have used its puny front legs to help it get up after lying down for a rest.”

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Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

Okay, so those are just some of the dinosaurs that lived on land. But there were other ones in the sea and in the air. Imagine if your nostrils were on the top of your head, your skull was long and pointy, and your arms and legs were more like paddles. What would you be good at? Exactly! You’d be an excellent swimmer—which would make you an ichthyosaur!

Let’s do one more! What would you be able to do if your “pinky bones grew really, really long and a membrane of skin was attached to these bones?” Sure! You’d be able to fly, and as a pterosaur, you’d be the first animal with bones to accomplish that amazing feat.

Now, you may have seen dinosaur skeletons in a museum and felt a little sad that you’d never see these creatures in person, but did you know that “you may have even seen one already today? What kind of animal would you be if you were a dinosaur living on Earth right now?” You’ll want to look skyward for this answer. “Scientists now consider birds to be dinosaurs,” and that they “use their first three fingers” to fly. “So if you want to find a dinosaur…Go outside and look around. You’re very likely to see one!”

Backmatter includes a discussion on birds as dinosaurs, a list of dinosaur groups, a glossary, a pronunciation guide, and resources for further study.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-fossil-by-fossil-birds

Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

Sara Levine draws on kids’ love of dinosaurs and their growing knowledge of human anatomy to create this mashup of science and laughs that teaches as much as it delights. By revealing on the first two pages that kid and dinosaur skeletons have many of the same kinds of bones, Levine immediately taps that “Wow!” factor that keeps children engaged in a topic.

Add on the funny “what if…” descriptions and illustrations of children sporting bony projections, long tails and necks, noses and fingers, and you’ve got a science book that readers can’t put down. Along the way, budding archaeologists and paleontologists learn facts about each dinosaur and the purpose of their particular anatomical feature or features. Levine’s conversational tone directly addresses her readers and makes learning as fun as going on a field trip with your best friend—how cool is that?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-fossil-by-fossil-skeletons

Image copyright T.S Spookytooth, 2018, text copyright Sara Levine, 2018. Courtesy of Millbrook Press.

Readers needn’t worry if they can’t quite imagine having horns sticking out of their head, being eighty feet long, or having pinky fingers long enough to roast marshmallows on. T.S Spookytooth has it all covered. As the diverse group of kids visit a museum of natural history, they suddenly find themselves sporting prehistoric traits that confound, surprise, and—as it is with kids—amuse them. Each dinosaur’s skeleton (as well as a human skeleton) is drawn clearly and with realistically.

The double gate-fold illustration of the diplodocus is a show-stopper, and you can bet that children will want to count the vertebrae! Spookytooth’s color palette and imagery beautifully represents the interior of a museum and shows the dinosaurs off to best advantage. The final two-page spread of the children interacting with today’s dinosaurs is whimsical, will inspire kids to look at birds differently, and holds a question—is there an imposter among them?

Fossil by Fossil: Comparing Dinosaur Skeletons would be a favorite addition to home bookshelves as well as classroom, school, and public libraries to spur enthusiastic learning.

Ages 5 – 10

Millbrook Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-1467794893

Discover more about Sara Levine and her books on her website

Learn more about T.S Spookytooth and his illustration work on his website

Book Blitz Month Activity

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Hatch Your Own Dinosaur Eggs

Think there are no more dinosaur eggs? Think again! You can make your own with this easy craft that will have you hatching some t-rex-size fun! All you need are a few simple ingredients!

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Supplies

  • Old clothes or apron
  • Large box of baking soda (makes between 6 and 8 eggs)
  • Food coloring
  • Water
  • Plastic dinosaur toys
  • Bowl
  • Fork
  • Spoon
  • Wax paper
  • Baking sheet
  • Foil
  • Vinegar
  • Spray bottle (optional)
  • Plastic or metal spoon, stick, popsicle stick, or other implement to chisel with
celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dinosaur-eggs-craft-vinegar-egg-open-darker

Spray the egg with vinegar to hatch your dinosaur

Directions

  1. Wear old clothes or an apron
  2. Cover work surface with wax paper, parchment paper, newspaper, or other protection. Food coloring can stain some surfaces
  3. Pour baking soda into the bowl
  4. Add drops of food coloring in whatever color you’d like your eggs to be. The eggs will darken when baked.
  5. Mix in the food coloring with the fork. You may want to use your hands, too
  6. When the baking soda is the color you want it, begin adding water a little at a time
  7. Add water until the baking soda holds together when you squeeze it in your hand
  8. When the baking soda is the right consistency, spoon some out into your hand or onto wax paper
  9. Push one plastic dinosaur into the middle
  10. Cover the dinosaur with more of the baking soda mixture
  11. Carefully form it into an egg shape
  12. Repeat with other dinosaurs
celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dinosaur-eggs-craft-chiseled -darker

Chisel the egg open to hatch your dinosaur

To Bake the Eggs

  1. Set the oven or toaster oven to 200 to 225 degrees
  2. Set the eggs on a baking sheet lined with foil
  3. Bake the eggs for 15 minutes, check
  4. Turn the eggs over and bake for 10 to 15 more minutes
  5. Remove from oven and let cool

To Hatch the Eggs

  1. Eggs can be hatched by chiseling them with a spoon, stick, or other implement
  2. Eggs can also be hatched by spraying or sprinkling them with vinegar

Picture Book Review

November 7 – It’s Picture Book Month

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About the Holiday

If you love picture books, you know the thrill of holding a new or a new-to-you book in your hands and opening up to that very first page. The children’s sections of bookstores and libraries draw you in with humor, fairy tales, poetry, biographies, science, and so much more—a whole universe of creativity, thought, knowledge, and imagination—that enlightens and entertains. This month take time to indulge your passion for picture books!

Books! Books! Books! Explore the Amazing Collection of the British Library

By Mick Manning and Britta Granström

 

Everyone knows you can fit a book into a library, but how do you fit a library into a book? Mick Manning and Britta Granström have very tidily discovered a way to translate the content and atmosphere of the incredible British Library into their visually stunning and packed-full-of-knowledge picture book. Opening with a brief history of the library building and its holdings, the authors then invite readers inside to take a look.

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Copyright Mick Manning and Britta Granström, 2017, courtesy of Candlewick Press.

First on display are “ancient handmade books like the St. Cuthbert Gospel, found in a coffin!” this little book is the oldest surviving book to have been produced in Europe that still has its original covers and binding, dating to before 687 CE. After being trekked around England in the coffin—just one step ahead of invading Vikings—it was removed from its hiding place, kept by a private collector, and finally bought by the British Library for nine million pounds in 2011.

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Copyright Mick Manning and Britta Granström, 2017, courtesy of Candlewick Press.

Any English major knows all about the thrilling Scandinavian story of Beowulf—“the oldest surviving long poem in Old English.” The copy found in the British Library is “three thousand lines long” and “was hand-written in the eleventh century.” Here too is the Magna Carta—one of the most influential legal documents in the world. And the Canterbury Tales may just be something assigned in high school to some people, to others it is a technological marvel—“the first book ever printed in English using an amazing invention: moveable type and a printing press.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-books-books-books-magna-carta

Copyright Mick Manning and Britta Granström, 2017, courtesy of Candlewick Press.

“Big book” doesn’t begin to describe the Klencke Atlas which was made for England’s King Charles the Second. It is so “ginormous” at 7 feet x 5 feet 10 inches (2,1 x 1.78 meters) that “it takes six people to lift it!” What’s the smallest book, you ask? That would be Lady Jane Grey’s Prayer Book. Measuring just 2 ¾ x 3 3/8 inches (70 x 85 millimeters), it accompanied her to her execution after she ruled England for only nine days. Then there are books of all sizes that “are so valuable that they are kept in bombproof strong rooms, deep underground.”

Britain has produced many of the greatest writers of all time, and their books can also be found here. Authors such as Jane Austin; Emily, Charlotte, and Anne Brontë; and Charles Dickens. Any good library offers books of all types—not just fiction—and the British Library is no exception. You’ll find cookbooks, medical books, and scientific books, like writings by Leonardo da Vinci, Oliver Goldsmith, and Charles Darwin.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-books!-books!-books!-alice-in-wonder-land

Copyright Mick Manning and Britta Granström, 2017, courtesy of Candlewick Press.

There’s the fantastic—like Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland—and the mysterious—like the cases of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. Some writings don’t come in a book, but they move people all the same. That’s why the British Library also has collections of sheet music from the world’s greatest composers and “a copy of every newspaper published every day in Britain and Ireland since 1869, as well as many more going back to the seventeenth century.”

How does one library hold so many books? Well, many of them are contained in vaults, and if you were to order one for viewing or to check out, it would come on “an automatic conveyor system, like a little railway.” That’s the way one library can hold so many books, and now you know how one book can hold an entire library!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-books!-books!-books!-music

Copyright Mick Manning and Britta Granström, 2017, courtesy of Candlewick Press.

Mick Manning and Britta Granström’s text-and-illustration collaboration creates a masterful tour of one of the world’s most treasured institutions. Choosing which books and authors to highlight, must have been an awesome task (in both senses of the word), and Manning and Granström more than succeed with their collection of the fascinating, familiar, and fantastic. Leading off with a book preserved in a coffin is a combination of comic and creepy genius that kids will eat up, and ending with perennial favorite, Sherlock Holmes, who is known to all ages, is elementary brilliance. Each book or type of book is presented on a two-page spread that includes a brief history and description of the work or collection, a bit about the author, and, where appropriate, a snippet from the story.

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Copyright Mick Manning and Britta Granström, 2017, courtesy of Candlewick Press.

Dynamic collage-style illustrations employ era-appropriate colors, typefaces, and images for each book introduced, allowing readers to clearly see the authors, subjects, characters, and themes each work encompasses. A skeleton lies in a dark casket, his bony hand holding the St. Cuthbert Gospel; Beowulf rips the arm off a Grendel created from pages written in Old English; Lady Jane Grey’s shadow portrays her executioner; old-style anatomical drawings inform the discussion of medical books; as Charles Dickens walks past a wall plastered in broadsides of his book covers, could that be little Oliver Twist pickpocketing his pocket watch?; and Lewis Carroll sits at the table with Alice, a Dormouse, the White Rabbit, and the Mad Hatter.

More information about the works and their authors as well as a glossary follows the text.

For book lovers, every page of Books! Books! Books! brings a smile. It would be a welcome addition to home bookshelves and a fantastic resource for school or classroom libraries.

Ages 8 – 12

Candlewick Press, 2017 | ISBN 978-0763697570

Discover more about the books produced by Mick Manning and Britta Granström on their website.

Picture Book Month Activity

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Book Jacket Bookmark

 

If you can’t get enough of reading, print out one—or more!—of this printable Book Jacket Bookmark. Why not add the title of a story you would write to the spine then color it before slipping it between the pages of your book?

Picture Book Review

August 13 – What Will Be Your Legacy Month

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About the Holiday

As you grow and have difference experiences, it’s fun and instructive to look back and reflect on your life: are you doing the things that make you  happy? Are you performing your job and other responsibilities the way you want to be? What impact you are making? This month’s holiday encourages people to think about their legacy and make changes if desired. 

Homer Henry Hudson’s Curio Museum

By Zack Rock

 

Everything has a story, the narrator tells readers, especially the Homer Henry Hudson Curio Museum, which, he says, has been described as “a colossal collection of curios, discovered, described, and displayed by that eccentric explorer extraordinaire: Homer Henry Hudson.”

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Copyright Zack Rock, 2014, courtesy of The Creative Company

Come in and experience the wonders inside. A dignified bulldog dressed in a dapper tweed suit and leaning on a crooked cane will greet you. His job is to keep the place clean and dusted. Although the museum is stuffed floor to ceiling, he knows the placement of every object, knick-knack, and curiosity. As you explore the museum’s holdings—its portraits, musical instruments, ancient artifacts, taxidermy animals, and other treasures, the caretaker sits silently, hoping you will read the display cards that Homer Henry Hudson has lovingly written out with a description and personal note. He even has his favorite “bits and bobs” that he would like you to see.

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Copyright Zack Rock, 2014, courtesy of The Creative Company

One of these is Item #0001, the Conausaurus Skull of a small dinosaur from the late Jurassic Period that HHH found in the soil of his family’s farm. This bony discovery made Homer Henry wonder what else the world held and sparked his love of exploration. Another is Item #0023, a Radial Tide Diviner once used by Calypsonian seers to predict the future based on tidal patterns. It was the discovery of the lost Calypsonian civilization with its valuable artifacts that funded Homer’s further explorations.

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Copyright Zack Rock, 2014, courtesy of The Creative Company

Item #3412, a Temple Montepaz Choir Finch with a C sharp trill that chanted to accompany the parrot priest, was a most unusual gift. It was bestowed on HHH for convincing the Parrot Priest to release a piece of wood stripped from the temple wall. This shard turned out to lead Homer Henry Hudson into his future—for better or worse. With renewed fire, HHH charged toward the promise of riches only to fly his plane into a mammoth stone figurehead, which resulted in injury and his life-long limp.

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Copyright Zack Rock, 2014, courtesy of The Creative Company

Item #3415, The Manneken Mort of King Ingmar, is perhaps Homer Henry’s most treasured possession. Composed of fabric bands that represent the stories friends and family tell when someone dies, this Manneken Mort contains hundreds of bands relating the life of King Ingmar. This object HHH acquired for bravery and self-sacrifice when he was younger and still full of enthusiasm for life.

The old bulldog thinks of this curio most. He wonders what his Manneken will look like and whether all the bands of his life have been woven. He likes to think his Manneken Mort “would be  hundreds—thousands—of feet tall. It’d tower over the Taj Mahal, shame the Sphinx!” But he knows “few memorable tales are told of rusty old codgers who spent their days…leaning upon fear like a crutch.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-homer-henry-hudson's-curio-museum-end-papers

Copyright Zack Rock, 2014, courtesy of The Creative Company

Though blind in one eye and nagged by trepidation, the old bulldog packs his suitcase, dons his hat and throws away his cane. As he walks out the door, past pictures of himself on his early expeditions of discover, he knows he might “meet with catastrophe,” be “swallowed by quicksand,” or “gnawed on by piranhas.” But he also knows “there’s no success without failures,” and he has had many successes.

Homer Henry Hudson boards the cruise liner Phoenix and sets out for adventure once more. After all, he well knows that everything has a story. So if you come by the Homer Henry Hudson Museum today, you will see a sign hanging on the door: The Curio Museum is CLOSED Until Further Notice.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-homer-henry-hudson's-curio-museum-leaving

Copyright Zack Rock, 2014, courtesy of The Creative Company

Zack Rock has written a compelling and unique picture book for adventurers of all types and ages. Part motivation and part cautionary tale, this story of the once intrepid explorer turned tremulous caretaker has a mysterious, treasure-around-every-corner quality that will appeal to kids. The life of Homer Henry Hudson is told through the display cards that accompany some of the museum’s curios. As the story develops through the cards’ personal notes, readers learn of the museum’s true owner and the life-altering decision he makes.

Rock’s illustrations in greens and parchment-paper golds and browns have a high “Oh, Cool!” factor as the odd, ancient, and unusual objects of the museum invite kids to explore every nook and cranny of the pages. The exhibits serve not only to fill the museum, however; they remind us how easily the future can get overshadowed and crowded out by the past.

Ages 6 – 10

The Creative Company/Creative Editions, 2014 | ISBN 978-1568462608

To discover more about Zack Rock and his books and to view a gallery of his artwork, visit his website!

What Will be Your Legacy Month Activity

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Legacy Letter Page

 

If you were building a museum about your life, what would you put in it? Write or draw about what you would put in your museum on this printable Legacy Letter Page

 

Picture Book Review

August 2 – It’s American Artist Appreciation Month

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About the Holiday

Celebrating art is always a great thing! This month we celebrate art created in America. The unique history, landscape, population, and cultural influences of the United States fosters artwork that is distinctively American. This month gives us the opportunity to explore pieces dating back to the founding of our country as well as the paintings, sculpture, crafts, pottery, and other arts being created today. Take the time to visit museums, galleries, arts and craft shows, and theaters to discover old favorites and new inspiration.

Seen Art?

Written by Jon Scieszka | Illustrated by Lane Smith

 

A little boy has arranged to meet his friend Art at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Fifty-third Street in New York City. When he arrives, however, Art isn’t there. The boy asks a woman nearby, “‘Have you seen Art?’” The lady points him in the direction of a beautiful new building further down the street. When he gets there, the boy doesn’t see Art, but he does meet an official-looking gentleman. “‘You seen Art?’” the boy inquires.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

“‘MoMA?” the man asks. The boy thinks, didn’t the lady ask the same thing? Figuring it’s some kind of code word, he answers, “‘Yes.’” Great news! The building is just opening, the man tells him. After giving another woman the code word, the boy is led upstairs. She stops in front of a painting with blue swirls, writhing trees, and a moon glowing over a quiet village. “‘Can’t you just feel the restlessness? The color? The emotion?’” The boy can feel it, but he’s more interested in finding Art.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

A little man standing nearby seems to know where to go, and he leads the boy through a room filled with more paintings and sculpture. The man stops in front of a painting. “‘Look at that red! Look at that open box of crayons inviting us in. The grandfather clock? It has no hands. Time is suspended.’” The boy sees all this too. But, really, what he wants to know is—“‘is Art here?’”

A little girl across the room knows what he means. She can show him art. She takes him past a fur-covered teacup and spoon to a painting of an eye. But this is no ordinary eye. Instead of blue, brown, or green, this eye is clouds. “‘Your dream can be what is real,’” she explains. They see another painting with a melting clock in which time is messed up too, but it’s still not Art.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

Suddenly, a painter hugs the boy for his astute observation. He asks, is art “‘trying to capture dreams? Or is it making images everyone can recognize?’” Next, a lady shows the boy an alarming painting of a woman with whom she identifies, and a baby points out a picture of a brown “‘moo moo’” cow. It seems that in every corner there is another person expounding on a painting in front of them: the shapes, the mystery!, the composition, the color, the atmosphere.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

But each time the boy answers, “‘Not exactly the Art I was looking for.’” Perhaps, he is interested in the Bell-47D1 helicopter hanging from the ceiling. Is it art? The boy strides past more pieces; they are puzzling, personal, playful, provocative and powerful. Art is not just paintings, he is told. Finally! They seem to be getting it. He begins to ask one more time about his friend, but he’s shown more photographs, sculpture, objects, and films.

The boy decides he needs to find Art on his own. He discovers a majestic painting as long as two rooms, a slippy-slidey chair, images of soup cans that make him hungry…the café…and sculptures of a family and a goat. Soon itvs time to leave. Back on the sidewalk and feeling dejected, the boy thinks he’ll never find his friend. “‘Hello, again,’” he hears. It’s the lady he met that morning. “‘Did you find art?’” she asks.

The boy is about to say no, but he remembers everything he has seen. “‘Yes,’” he answers. And when he finds Art waiting for him, the two go through MoMA again.

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Image copyright Lane Smith, 2005, text copyright Jon Scieszka, 2005. Courtesy of Viking Books for Young Readers.

Notes on each piece along with thumbnail images follow the text.

With clever word play, a humorous nod to the juxtaposed ideas “I know what I like/I like what I know,” and a wink at the world of art criticism, Jon Scieszka takes readers on a tour of the art collection at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. The simple misunderstanding of the word Art in the story introduces children to the nature of interpretation and the variety of forms it can take. Through the many people the little boy meets, Scieszka presents a fabulous opportunity for adults and children to talk about opinions and how each person can have their own while accepting those of others. Scieszka’s rich language is as enticing as the art presented and gives kids and adults a vast vocabulary to use in talking about what art—and life—has to offer.

Lane Smith’s simple line-drawn and abstract figures are the perfect tour guides to the reproductions of famous paintings, sculpture, installations, and other art found at MoMA. Printed in full, vibrant color, the artwork dazzles, drawing readers in to stop and explore each image. An excellent survey of classic and modern pieces will delight and fascinate kids.

For art lovers and those just discovering the world of creativity, Seen Art? is an absorbing book that will entice both children and adults to learn more about art. The book would be a fun and engaging addition to school art programs or units as well as for home libraries.

Ages 3 – 8 and up

Viking Books for Young Readers, 2005 |ISBN 978-0670059867

Discover more about about Jon Scieszka, his books, and other fun stuff on his website.

View a gallery of book illustration and other artwork by Lane Smith on his website.

American Artists Appreciation Month Activity

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Rainbow Crayon Art

 

With this cool project you can create an art piece that’s as colorful as a rainbow and as unique as you are! Adult help is needed for children.

Supplies

  • Box of 24 crayons
  • White foam board or thick poster board, 8 inches by 17 inches
  • A small piece of corrugated cardboard, about 5 inches by 5 inches (a piece of the foam board can also be used for this step)
  • A small piece of poster board, about 5 inches by 5 inches
  • Scissors
  • X-acto knife (optional)
  • Hot glue gun
  • Hair dryer
  • Old sheets or towels, newspapers, a large box, or a trifold display board

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celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-rainbow-crayon-craft

Directions

  1. Remove the various red, orange, yellow, blue, indigo, and violet hued crayons from the box of crayons
  2. Strip the paper from the crayons by slicing the paper with the x-acto knife, or removing it by hand
  3. Line them up in order at the top of the white foam board
  4. With the hot glue gun, attach the crayons to the board with their tips facing down 
  5. Cut an umbrella or other shape of your choice from the poster board
  6. Trace the umbrella or other shape onto the corrugated cardboard or a piece of the foam board and cut out
  7. Glue the umbrella or other shape to the foam board, about 4 ½ inches below the crayons, let dry
  8. Set up a space where you can melt the crayons. The wax will fly, so protect the floor and walls by placing the art piece in a large box or by hanging newspapers, old sheets or towels on the walls and placing newspapers on the floor. A trifold display board and newspapers works well.
  9. Stand the art piece upright with the crayons at the top
  10. With the hot setting of the hair dryer, blow air at the crayons until they start to melt
  11. Move the hair dryer gently back and forth across the line of crayons from a distance of about 6 to 12 inches away. The closer you are to the crayons, the more they will splatter.
  12. The crayons will begin to melt and drip downward
  13. You can experiment with aiming the hair dryer straight on or at an angle to mix colors
  14. Wax that drips onto the umbrella or other shape can be chipped off after it dries or wiped off to create a “watercolor” effect on the shape
  15. Once the hair dryer is turned off, the wax cools and dries quickly
  16. Hang or display your art!

Picture Book Review