October 19 – Celebrating the Book Birthday of One Sheep, Two Sheep

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About the Holiday

Is there anything better than celebrating the birthday of a book for the youngest readers? Little ones bring unbridled excitement to finding new stories to love for bedtime or anytime. Smiles, giggles, and requests for “again!” make family reading time the best time of the day! Today’s book addition to those sleepy time snuggles.

One Sheep, Two Sheep

Written by Tammi Sauer | Illustrated by Troy Cummings

 

The moon and stars are shining and it’s time for Rooster to go to sleep. As he climbs the ramp to his coop, he says goodnight to all of his “wonderful farm friends.” Snuggled under the covers, Rooster drowsily gazes out the window where he’s happy to see the flock of sheep gathering in a field on the other side of the fence. “I must count sheep,” he says.

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Image copyright Troy Cummings, 2021, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2021. Courtesy of Abrams Appleseed.

“One sheep. Two sheep. Three sheep.” The sheep are happy to oblige, each clearing the fence in their own creative way. But then… a chicken hops the fence. Rooster bolts upright in bed. “EEP!” He sticks his head out the window and gives the chicken a little piece of his mind. “Whoa! Whoa! Whoa! A CHICKEN?! I’m sorry, but this is a serious bedtime business.” Then he lets the chicken know that he is a sheep-exclusive counter.

Back in cozy sleep mode, with his stuffed corn cob toy in wing, Rooster goes back to counting three more sheep until… “EEP!” Pig leaps over the fence. This time Rooster’s a little more lenient, but he wants his sheep back. And so he gets them. Sheep seven, eight, and nine jump, soar, and dive over the fence. But… “EEP!” Who’s this? Cow? In a tutu? Doing a jeté?! “Cock-a-doodle-DO WE NEED TO REVIEW?” Rooster says. He reminds them that he needs to count SHEEP and they “don’t look the slightest bit sheepish.” (But of course they do after this scolding.)

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-one-sheep-two-sheep-chicken

Image copyright Troy Cummings, 2021, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2021. Courtesy of Abrams Appleseed.

Back in bed, Rooster recaps where he is in the lineup. It’s time for number ten. Ahhh… can sleep be far behind? Well, the chicks want to have their turn too, so all seven let loose with “Cheep! Cheep! Cheep! Cheep! Cheep! Cheep! Cheep!” Rooster’s had enough. He comes to the door of his coop and tells each animal what they are. Each answers with a questioning “BAAA?” But Rooster sets them straight. Finally, Rooster is ready to roost, but the sheep—now all on this side of the fence—are ready to enjoy the pond, and with a leap and a “QUACK!” one cannonball’s in! What’s Rooster to do? He’s off to dreamland with his farmyard friends cloaked in fluffy white costumes.

Sure to make kids giggle, count along, and, especially, shout out “EEP!” Tammi Sauer’s One Sheep, Two Sheep is bedtime or story time fun at its best. For readers on the younger side of the target audience, it’s also an ingenious concept book that have little ones counting to ten and learning the names of farm animals in no time. Lots of puns, befuddled animals, and an unexpected ending all add up to a book kids will want to read again and again.

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Image copyright Troy Cummings, 2021, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2021. Courtesy of Abrams Appleseed.

Troy Cummings can always be counted on to accentuate the humor in Sauer’s stories (see their Not Now, Cow!, Abrams Appleseed, 2021  and Caring For Your Lion, Sterling, 2017). Here, the nimble farm animals, Rooster’s frantic facial expressions, silly costumes, and clever coop details will have readers laughing from page to page. Cummings’ simple, bold images and typography invite kids to join in on reading and also work as prompts for little ones to proudly share their knowledge of counting one to ten and the sounds sheep, pigs, chickens, cows, and chicks make.

A terrific addition to any child’s home library, One Sheep, Two Sheep is also a winner for preschool and kindergarten classrooms as well as school and public libraries.

Ages 3 – 6

Abrams Appleseed, 2021 | ISBN 978-1419746307

Discover more about Tammi Sauer and her books on her website.

To learn more about Troy Cummings, his books, and his art, visit his website.

One Sheep, Two Sheep Book Birthday Activities

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Sheep Coloring Pages and Dot-to-Dot

 

Little ones can enjoy coloring and counting with these three printable activity sheets.

Sheep Friends Coloring Page | Cute Ram Coloring Page | Sheep Dot-to-Dot

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You can find One Sheep, Two Sheep at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 18 – National No Beard Day

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About the Holiday

If you’re a fan of the bearded look – whether full or scruffy – today is a day to rethink your style and perhaps have a shave. If you’ve worn a beard for some time, do you remember what you looked like before your grew it? Does your family? Maybe you have kids who have never seen you without a beard! You may find you like a clean-shaven appearance. If not, of course, you can always regrow your beard – just like the townsfolk in today’s book! 

Thanks to minedition for sharing a copy of The King’s Golden Beard with me for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

The King’s Golden Beard

By Klaas Verplancke

 

“A long long time ago, when most people still believed the world was flat as a pancake, there lived a king with a beautiful beard.” The king lived for his shiny beard, admiring it in the mirror all day long and creating “special laws to protect his beard and help it grow.” One law stated that his beard could never be trimmed, and another forbid anyone (or anything) else to grow a beard or moustache. Everyone (and everything) was forced to shave every morning—thus, pirates, billy goats, puffer fish, whales, cacti, cats, and even brooms and brushes had to go hairless.

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Copyright Klaas Verplancke, 2021, courtesy of minedition.

If anyone grew even “one little hair,” they “would be cut into a thousand pieces with a pinchy pair of nail scissors!” Barbers suddenly had more customers than they could handle. In the king’s castle, all the portraits were stripped of beards as the king’s own facial hair, growing like a weed, “meandered through the vast corridors of the royal palace.” It even made its way out of a window, onto winding paths, and right across every Royal Beard Street in every village for miles around.

But it didn’t stop there. It snaked its way across the kingdom, and every “man, woman, child, and beast bowed down to the beard as it swished and swooshed past” them on its way to the deserts, forests, and mountains around the world. At last, the king’s beard reappeared at his own castle’s back door “because the earth, as you know, is round and not flat.”

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Copyright Klaas Verplancke, 2021, courtesy of minedition.

There a palace guard spotted this “‘strange beard’” and alerted the king. Outraged, the king ordered that the owner of this wayward beard “should be cut to pieces at once!” The guards began to follow the beard to its origin and carry out the king’s law. They traveled around the world right back to their castle—where the king sat admiring himself in many mirrors—and announced that they had found the beard’s owner. “‘Cut him into pieces,’ shouted the king.” And so they…. After all—”the law is the law.” The new king—as well as everyone in the kingdom—now understood that the world was round. And as for the old king’s law? With the new king, it didn’t stand a whisker of a chance.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-king's-golden-beard-penguins

Copyright Klaas Verplancke, 2021, courtesy of minedition.

Quirky, set in a time of willful ignorance and a self-glorifying leader, and ending with a well-deserved comeuppance, The King’s Golden Beard is a witty fable for our times. Klaas Verplancke’s humorous storytelling will appeal to kids with sly winks to their superior-to-the-king’s intelligence and laugh-inducing dialogue. As the king’s beard stretches its far-reaching influence around the world, lines of text invite kids to turn the book sideways and upside down on the journey to revealing the truth. Along with the laughs, Verplancke’s story provides a captivating way for adults and kids to discuss issues of fairness, vanity, justice, good leadership, and respect for science and scientists.

Verplancke’s eye-catching illustrations in teal, olive, brown, and plum accented with a yellowish gold, we’ve all seen before are fresh and funny. The king—never entirely seen except for a grinning mouth, red gloves, and black boots—is an outsized figure while the guards and townspeople charm with their abstract shapes and proportions.

Unique, timely, and multi-layered, The King’s Golden Beard would be a much-asked for favorite on any home, school, and library bookshelf.

Ages 4 – 8 (and up)

minedition, 2021 | ISBN 978-1662650390

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-king's-golden-beard-worksheet

Copyright Klaas Verplancke, 2021, courtesy of minedition.

To learn more about Klaas Verplancke, his books, and his art, visit his website. Kids can learn how to draw the king’s very distinctive guards here too!

National No Beard Day Activity

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Marvelous Moustaches

 

Moustaches can look distinguished or madcap! Here are some printable Marvelous Moustaches that you can use to make yourself look whacky, wild, and wonderful! Just color them, glue or tape each to a thin wooden craft stick or chop stick and hold them to your face for fun!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-king's-golden-beard-cover

You can find The King’s Golden Beard at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 13 – National Fossil Day

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About the Holiday

Did you know that some fossils date back to 4.1 BILLION years ago? Just think of that the next time you’re feeling a little bit old (or so recommends the website National Today). Today we celebrate National Fossil Day to recognize the importance (and, well, awesomeness) of paleontologists, geologists, and fossils in providing us with information on the history of our earth and those who have inhabited it before us. ​National Today provides some further information, with a timeline of fossil history, and fun facts like this one: The highest amount ever paid for a dinosaur fossil was $8.3 million (they named it “Sue”).

To celebrate National Fossil Day, check out National parks near you, learn more about fossils, do something to help protect the earth, read some books about evolution—like Chicken Frank, Dinosaur!—or visit the National Parks page for more information and resources on how to celebrate our geologic heritage.

Thanks to Albert Whitman & Company for sharing a copy of Chicken Frank, Dinosaur! with me for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Review by Dorothy Levine

Chicken Frank, Dinosaur!

Written by S.K. Wenger | Illustrated by Jojo Ensslin

 

If you ask Chicken Frank he’ll tell you, “I’m a dinosaur! Cluckity-roar!” But the other barnyard animals aren’t so sure. Everyone is puzzled by this evolution thing Frank keeps talking about (“Evo-what?”). Chicken Frank tries to explain, “Evolution! Change! Change happens over time so we can survive.” He takes a stick and draws lines of lineage, connecting crocodiles to plant-eating dinosaurs and eventually birds. “From a dinosaur. See?” But the other animals don’t see it: “I see a chicken who was a chicken five minutes ago,” a sheep says. “I see a chicken who’s been a chicken since he hatched,” a pig chimes in.

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Image copyright Jojo Ensslin, 2021, text copyright S. K. Wenger, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Chicken Frank then presents different types of evidence to try to convince the farm that birds evolved from dinosaurs. He points out his feet look like those of T. rexes, to which another chicken looks at the readers and says, “More like T. crazy.” Frank explains that feathers evolved from dinosaur scales, and that both dinos and chickens had little tails when they were embryos. Other animals start wondering if they come from dinosaurs, since they have tails too. So, in a last straw attempt, Chicken Frank returns to his mud lineage map once more.

He shows how fish, amphibians, reptiles and mammals come from different branches in the evolutionary tree. Birds, however, branch off from reptiles. Nobody is convinced, and pig, sheep, and horse turn their attention to pretending to be unicorns with carrot horns instead. But then, the results from Frank’s DNA test arrive. The data shows Chicken Frank has a reptilian cousin: Crocodile Ike.

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Image copyright Jojo Ensslin, 2021, text copyright S. K. Wenger, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Chicken Frank decides to send a post card to his cousin Ike inviting him to come for a family reunion, much to the dismay of everyone. A crocodile and a chicken in the same place? Seems like a recipe for disaster…and maybe some chicken franks too. And while Crocodile Ike and his mom are first tempted to gobble Frank up, they take some time and study his charts. And, to everyone’s surprise, they get it! “One of us isn’t a dinosaur… But we’re both Archosaurs! KINGS of the dinosaurs! Roar!” Ike tells Frank. Ike’s mom wonders who else they may be related to, so Frank starts a letter to an even further distant cousin—the sharks!

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Image copyright Jojo Ensslin, 2021, text copyright S. K. Wenger, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

They all decide to take a trip to the aquarium, where the pig, sheep, and horse are delighted to find “a swimming unicorn!” (a narwhal), and Crocodile Ike exclaims, “family!” Chicken Frank happily agrees and adds, “Ours is the very best.”

The story is followed by five informational sections: “What Is DNA?”, “What Is Evolution?”, “Is Chicken Frank Really Related to T. rex?” “Similarities Between Dinosaurs, Chickens, and Alligators”, and “Frank’s Glossary of Favorite Animal Groups” Each of these sections provide in-depth scientific explanations for those who want to know a bit more about how it all works. S. K. Wenger masterfully explains each of these concepts at an advanced level that is clear to read and understand for readers of a wide range of age and abilities.

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Image copyright Jojo Ensslin, 2021, text copyright S. K. Wenger, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

A joyous read, with important concepts about evolution scattered in with the fun. This comic-style picture book will have kids laughing out loud at the farm animals’ speech bubble puns and jokes. S. K. Wenger (and Chicken Frank) explain concepts of evolution in easily digestible terms for readers of all ages. The story is quick-paced and intriguing, with distinct characters and a quirky humor. A must-read for all kids, especially those with a fondness for dinosaurs.

The story would not be nearly as fun or educational without Jojo Ensslin’s colorful, cartoon-like drawings. As Chicken Frank explains his evolutionary reasoning, Ensslin depicts the ideas clearly and closely juxtaposed. For example, when Frank talks about how his feet match those of a T. rex, kids see both feet on the same page. Likewise, a scaled dinosaur and an ancient bird are portrayed on the same blackboard.

Later, when Ike receives the postcard from Frank in a muddy swamp, swarming with crocodiles, and calls out, “Does anyone know a cousin named Frank?” little speech bubbles with “Nope!” scatter the swamp, prompting kids to join in. In a carved-out corner, a close-up view of Ike and his mom show their evil plans to crash the reunion with some chompers. The facial expressions of each of the animals add to their characters and the humor of the story. Many carefully placed illustrative details add to the plot in meaningful and silly ways, such as, the DNA Test Kit shown the page before the story begins and the large bone Chicken Frank stores in his coop; the illustrations and text come together to create a read-aloud that is enjoyable to all.

Creative nonfiction at its best, Chicken Frank, Dinosaur! is both a hilarious story and a highly engaging way to explain evolutionary science in a way kids will respond to and remember. Sure to spark an interest in further science learning, the book is highly recommended for home bookshelves and a must for school and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 7

Albert Whitman & Company, 2021 | ISBN 978-0807511411

Discover more about S. K. Wenger and her books on her website.

To learn more about Jojo Ensslin and view a portfolio of his illustration, animation, and woodcout work, visit his website.

National Fossil Day Activitycelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-chicken-frank-dinosaur-national-park-service-dinosaur-coloring-pageDinosaur Coloring Pages

 

Enjoy these four dinosaur coloring pages from the National Park Service’s free prehistoric coloring book in honor of National Fossil Day!

Dinosaur Coloring Pages

For more, you can download the whole coloring book from the National Park Service here.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-chicken-frank-dinosaur-cover

You can find Chicken Frank, Dinosaur! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 8 – World Octopus Day

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About the Holiday

With fossils dating back 300 million years, the octopus is one of the world’s oldest and most fascinating creatures. It’s also one of the smartest—as it has more than 500 million neurons firing information through its brain and arms, allowing them to learn from experience and solve problems. Octopuses are adaptable and are found in all the world’s oceans. While most prefer warmer waters and living along the ocean floor, some species swim in shallower, cooler waters. Octopuses have an excellent sense of touch and sense of vision—some even see in color. They fool predators by hiding or camouflaging themselves and can escape capture by shooting an inky substance at their pursuers. To celebrate today’s holiday, plan a visit to an aquarium or other sea life center!

All I Want is an Octopus

Written by Tracy Gunaratnam | Illustrated by Valentina Fontana

 

Throughout the city, a little boy sees pets of all kinds going here and there with their humans. He knows kids with dogs and cats, hamsters and turtles, mice and even a horse. “But all he wants is an… octopus!” His dad tells him an octopus “‘belongs in the sea.’” His son’s response? “‘But DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD! My octopus would wash your car. / He’d paint the house and play guitar.’” His dad thinks about it and is pretty impressed. As he sprinkles food into their fish tank, he says he’ll leave it up to Mom.

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Image copyright Tracy Gunaratnam, 2021, text copyright Valentina Fontana, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts Publishing.

But when the boy asks his mom, she tells him the idea is silly and to get ready for bed. Her son’s response? “‘But MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM!’” Then he tells her how helpful the octopus would be, and she’s just as impressed as Dad had been. She tells him to go ask his Gran. Gran doesn’t need any convincing at all. In fact, she thinks an octopus will “‘roller skate and jump in puddles… /…Play mini golf and give wonderful cuddles.’”

The boy is star struck—even he didn’t think of these. But while his Gran thinks having an octopus would be a great bet, she’s already invited another pet. Who could it be? Ding Dong! Open the door and you will see!

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Image copyright Tracy Gunaratnam, 2021, text copyright Valentina Fontana, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts Publishing.

Silly in the best way and with dialogue kids are going to love to chime in on, Tracy Gunaratnam’s funny rhyming story is perfect for lively family, classroom, or library story times. All I Want is an Octopus would make a captivating lead-in and prompt for classroom writer’s workshops on pets and family negotiations. At home, kids would have fun imagining what other jobs around the house an octopus could do as well as talking about an unusual pet they’d like to have.

Valentina Fontana’s adorable guitar-playing, hair-styling, mini golf-playing pink octopus will have kids wanting one of their own. Her fresh, vibrant illustrations, rendered in a lovely color palette, also hold clues that kids will have fun deciphering as to why each of the various other pets are a perfect match for its owner. The book Gran is reading also hints at the surprise ending, and the final spread will bring a smile to all kids with big dreams.

A light-hearted read aloud that kids and adults will enjoy sharing at story time or bedtime, All I Want is an Octopus makes a terrific gift and sure favorite on home, school, and library bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 9

Maverick Arts, 2021 | ISBN 978-1848867796

You can connect with Valentina Fontana on Instagram.

World Octopus Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sock-octopus-craft

Cute Sock Octopus Craft

 

Who wouldn’t like to have a cute octopus for a pet? With this fast and easy craft you can make your own little cephalopod to hang out on your bed, your shelves, or on your desk!

Supplies

  • Child’s medium or large size sock, in any color
  • Polyfill, available at craft and sewing stores
  • Ribbon
  • 2 Small buttons
  • Scissors
  • Hot glue or strong glue

Directions

  1. Fill the toe of the sock with a handful of polyfiber fill
  2. Tie the ribbon tightly around the sock underneath the fiber fill to separate the head from the legs
  3. Tie the ribbon into a bow tie
  4. With the scissor cut up both sides of the sock almost to the ribbon
  5. Cut these two sections in half almost to the ribbon
  6. Cut the four sections in half almost to the ribbon
  7. Glue the eyes to the lower part of the head
  8. To display, set the octopus down and arrange the legs in a circle around the head

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-all-I-want-is-an-octopus-cover

You can find All I Want is an Octopus at these booksellers

Amazon | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 6 – Get Ready for Halloween

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About the Holiday

October may have just begun, but kids are already thinking of the thrills and chills of Halloween. Witches and jack-o-lanterns, ghosts and skeletons take center stage all month long with fun Halloween-themed books like this one. So get shivering and giggling with the kids and skeleton in today’s book! 

Thanks go to Page Street Kids for sharing a copy of If You Ever Meet a Skeleton for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own. 

Review by Dorothy Levine

If You Ever Meet a Skeleton

Written by Rebecca Evans | Illustrated by Katrin Dreiling

 

Have you ever met a skeleton? No? Phew. Well, if you ever do, there’s no need to be spooked! If You Ever Meet a Skeleton teaches that creepy crawly bones that emerge on Halloween are not as scary as you may think.

On Halloween night, a skeleton claws its way out of the earth, and the trick-or-treating children are frightened. They run away as the bones follow, stumbling over hills and fallen candy. When the skeleton catches up, the kids realize that it may not be as fearsome as they first thought. When they all try to play, the kids find out skeletons have no guts, no muscles, no brains: Because they have no muscle, they can’t win races, and with no brain to count with they play hide-and-seek. “Skeletons have no guts, so they can’t be brave like you. They’re scared of nighttime shadows and owls that say ‘whoooo’”— just like these kids, or maybe me, or you!

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Image copy Katrin Dreiling, 2021, text copyright Rebecca Evans, 2021. Courtesy of Page Street Kids.

Skeletons have no nose to smell the stinky boots of kids. But most of all, “Skeletons have no friends,” and “they’d like to find a few: some kids with stinky feet and little brothers too.” When a child loses his shoe the skeleton returns it to him, and the group of friends invite the skeleton up to their treehouse fort.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you-ever-meet-a-skeleton-running

Image copy Katrin Dreiling, 2021, text copyright Rebecca Evans, 2021. Courtesy of Page Street Kids.

They find that “Skeletons like to smile at stories in the dark…” and “they’ll trick-or-treat with you then share their chocolate bar just like buddies do.” And when one friend’s mother brings drinks out to the fort, they love to hear her “SHRIEK!” They dance and play and draw a trio of other skeletons hoping to join their joyous, Halloween romp.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you-ever-meet-a-skeleton-boots

Image copy Katrin Dreiling, 2021, text copyright Rebecca Evans, 2021. Courtesy of Page Street Kids.

While skeletons seem spooky to the kids at first, Rebecca Evan’s lyrical rhyming prose about skeletons’ parts helps readers to realize they’re not so scary after all. The story contains an underlying message encouraging readers to not be scared of making friends that may seem different at first glance. The story of friendship is simple, sweet and a delight to read. It’s a perfect bedtime story for anyone who may be frightened of (or excited by) spooky Halloween creatures. Treat yourself by getting into the Halloween spirit with this quirky read!  

Katrin Dreiling is well known for her spooky, yet adorable drawings. She says, “the spooky is a fascinating genre to work with because you need to create a certain atmosphere in a spooky illustration. Also, it is very challenging to achieve a balance so that the finished work is neither too scary nor too bland.” Her multi-medium illustrations in If You Ever Meet a Skeleton accomplish this exactly. The skeletons and children mirror each other with the same cute and spooked expressions. With spreads that are fully black and white, adding to the late-night Halloween scene, pops of red, gold and green draw attention to the diverse cast of children and glorious candy details of the story.

A creative tale of friendship and festivities on Halloween night, If You Ever Meet a Skeleton combines spooky and sweet framed by the tradition of trick-or-treating. The story can also provide a fun way to introduce anatomy to young readers throughout the year.

Ages 4 – 8

Page Street Kids, 2021 | ISBN 978-1645672159

Discover more about Rebecca Evans, her books, and her art on her website.

To learn more about Katrin Dreiling, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Get Ready for Halloween Activity

A Little Artsy A Little Craftsy Q-tip Skeleton Image 2

Q-tip Skeleton from A Little Artsy A Little Crafty (littleartsylittlecraftsy.blogspot.com)

 

Create Your Own Q-tip Skeleton Friend

 

You can make a skeleton just in time for Halloween with this easy craft by A Little Artsy A Little Craftsy. Will your skeleton be dancing, walking, scaring—or maybe trick-or-treating? You can find the directions for this craft as well as other fun crafts and delicious recipes on A Little Artsy A Little Craftsy.

You Will Need

  • Q-tips
  • Glue
  • 1 piece of black or other dark colored construction paper
  • 1 piece of white paper or white foam sheet
A Little Artsy A Little Craftsy Q-tip Skeleton Image 1

Q-tip Skeleton from A Little Artsy A Little Crafty (littleartsylittlecraftsy.blogspot.com)

 

What to Do

To Make the Bones

  1. Draw and cut out a skull from the white paper or foam sheet
  2. Cut eyes, a nose, and a mouth in the skull
  3. Cut 2 Q-tips in half for the legs
  4. Cut 2 Q-tips shorter than the leg parts for the arms
  5. Use 4 Q-tips to create the ribs (the top two sets will be slightly shorter than the bottom two)
  6. Cut 1 short piece from the end of one Q-tip to make the neck
  7. Cut 2 short pieces from the ends of one Q-tip to make the feet
  8. Use the stick part of one Q-tip to make the spine
  9. Use the stick part of one Q-tip to cut small pieces for the fingers

To Assemble the Skeleton

  1. Decide how you will pose your skeleton
  2. To make elbow, knee, and ankle joints, glue the “bones” to the construction paper tip-to-tip, end-to-end, or tip-to-end by following the example in the picture.
  3. Follow the picture to place the ribs, neck, and fingers

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you-ever-meet-a-skeleton-cover

You can find If You Ever Meet a Skeleton at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

September 30 – It’s Read a New Book Month

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About the Holiday

You’ve heard the saying “Too Many Books, Too Little Time,” right? Well, this truism has spawned not only one, but two Read a New Book Month celebrations! Both September and December have been designated as times to make special plans to search out and read new books. These can be books that are newly published or books that are new to you. And if you find yourself putting a few old favorites in the pile, that’s okay too! Today’s book bridges both months because It’s never too early to think about adding books to those upcoming holiday gift lists!

The Christmas Crumb

Written by Lou Treleaven | Illustrated by Alex Willmore

 

“Way up in the clouds, where the air is much thinner, / A giant royal family ate Christmas dinner.” The turkey and ham were simply enormous, and the bowl of potatoes so large and so deep that a child from Earth down below “could get in and hide.” But the most magnificent thing was the Yule log dessert that lay on the platter like, well, a freshly cut tree. As the giants gobbled their cake, one crumb fell to the floor. It bounced and it rolled right out the door.

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Image copyright Alex Willmore, 2021, text copyright Lou Treleaven, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts Publishing.

The giant princess apologized for losing the crumb, but her mother assured her that the crumb was so tiny no harm had been done. But the crumb had kept rolling, and it fell through the clouds then crashed through the door of a “tumbledown cottage” where “Pip sat with his mother. / They didn’t have much, but they did have each other.” Pip was ecstatic; this Christmas dessert could replace their “thin gruel.” He dug in with gusto, sending a smaller crumb flying.

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Image copyright Alex Willmore, 2021, text copyright Lou Treleaven, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts Publishing.

Pip was upset that he’d lost even a morsel, but his mom reassured him that it was “‘only a crumb. / So dinky, so diddy, it’s not worth the fussing. / It’s inconsequential – it really is nothing.’” By now that tinier crumb had found a new home in a mouse hole where “a dozen mice pups / Were getting quite desperate for food to turn up.” They swarmed on that crumb—their great Christmas feast that would feed them for weeks.

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Image copyright Alex Willmore, 2021, text copyright Lou Treleaven, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts Publishing.

In all of the scarfing, a small crumb came loose. It rolled off the table and through a crack in the floor. A couple of bounces left it out in the snow, where a group of red ants was about to eat leaves. But they gave up the cuttings as quick as a wink when this surprising treat—“almost as big as [their] nest—fell into their midst. They hugged and they celebrated; they had food for the winter, they were “‘going to survive!’” They cheered, “‘This Christmas bonanza has just saved our lives.’” Was that it, then? All the sharing that first crumb could do? You might think what was left was too tiny, too wee, but one ant “passed his share down to an overjoyed flea.” So this Christmas (and all through the year) remember that what one person thinks small, someone else will hold dear.

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Image copyright Alex Willmore, 2021, text copyright Lou Treleaven, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts Publishing.

Like the Christmas season itself, Lou Treleaven’s story of a treat that keeps on giving is full of charm, surprise, and cheer. Her set up of a royal giant family enjoying their holiday feast lends a magical plausibility to the idea of a crumb large enough to pass down and down and down again to feed multiple families—an idea that brings new delight each time a crumb escapes and finds a new home. Treleaven’s whimsical storyline soars on her jaunty rhyme scheme and her superb word choices that are humorous and heart-tugging at the same time.

Her deft messaging will appeal to children’s natural empathy as well as their awareness today of need in their communities as in each household the child apologizes for losing even a crumb. The adults’ repeated response, while providing a fun phrase for readers to join in on, can also lead to deeper discussions about the importance and rewards of giving.

Accompanying Lou Treleaven’s story are Alex Willmore’s hilarious and heartening illustrations that set the Christmas scene with fresh color tones and captivating details that show the impact the “crumb” has on each family. Spying a child hiding in the giants’ big bowl of potatoes will elicit giggles, and the characters’ facial expressions—from the princess’s delighted gasp at seeing the Yule log to the mother’s look of impending doom as the crumb barrels through her home—are priceless.

Willmore’s work with perspective is worthy of special note. Underlying Treleaven’s message that something’s worth is all in ones perspective, Willmore’s scenes employ close-up and distant views; commonly recognized items are juxtaposed to the giants, Pip and his mom, the mice, the ants, and finally the flea to show scale; and the runaway crumb becomes smaller and smaller but is always just the right size. Math-oriented kids will enjoy pointing these out, and some may like replicating scenes by physically arranging similar items. In a final spread, the princes, Pip, the mice, the ants, and even the barely perceptible flea line up with their crumbs in a meaningful demonstration of how something small to one person is big to another.

An utter delight from beginning to end, The Christmas Crumb offers a sweet message about giving and perspective that’s perfect for the holiday season and all year around. Adults and kids will love sharing this rollicking read aloud again and again. This is a book you’ll want to buy for your home, school, or public library shelves.

Ages 4 – 9

Maverick Arts, 2021 | ISBN 978-1848867765

Discover more about Lou Treleaven, her books, plays, and other work on her website. You’ll also find activities to print.

To learn more about Alex Willmore, his books, and his art, visit his website

Read a New Book Month Activity

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Mini Accordion Book

 

With this craft you can make a little book for your own writing, pictures, or stickers. With a holiday-themed cover, you can use it as an advent calendar or holiday wish list. This little book would also make a fun gift to make for your friends.

Supplies

  • 12-inch by 12-inch sheet of scrapbooking paper – single or double sided
  • Decorative scrapbooking paper, wrapping paper, or a page of the child’s own writing or drawing
  • Cardboard
  • Stickers, pictures
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Ruler
  • Pencil

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Directions

  1. Draw a 3-inch border around the edge of the 12-inch by 12-inch sheet of scrapbooking paper. This will make a 6-inch square in the center of the paper
  2. Draw a line from the top of the paper to meet the left edge of the 6-inch square. The line will be 3 inches from the left side of the paper.
  3. Draw a 3-inch line from the top center of the 6-inch square to the center of the square

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To Cut the Paper

  1. Beginning with the line at the top of the piece of paper, cut down the left edge of the 6-inch square.
  2. Cut across the bottom of the square.
  3. Cut up the right side of the square
  4. Cut across the top of the square to the line in the center.
  5. Cut down the 3-inch center line to the middle of the square

To Fold the Pages

  1. Draw light or dotted lines every 3 inches along the strip of paper
  2. Starting at the top of the strip, fold the paper on the lines accordion style.
  3. Make the first fold by folding the first 3-inch section down towards you.
  4. Fold the second 3-inch section back away from you
  5. Continue folding the 3-inch sections down and back until the strip is entirely folded

To Make the Cover

  1. Cut two 3 ½ -inch squares from the cardboard
  2. Cut two 4 ½-inch squares of from the decorative paper, wrapping paper, or child’s writing or drawing
  3. Cover the cardboard with the paper, folding the excess paper over the edges and securing with glue

To Assemble the Book

  1. With the strip of paper completely folded, glue one cover to the top 3-inch square
  2. Glue the second cover to the end 3-inch square

Fill the book with writing, drawings, stickers, whatever!

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You can find The Christmas Crumb at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

September 27 – Get Ready for Halloween

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About the Holiday

With its invitation to dress up, free candy, and spooky fun, Halloween is a favorite holiday of kids and adults—even pets get in on the act! With September winding down, Halloween will be here before you know it. Celebrating all the spookiness of ghosts, goblins, and especially witches, with their ability to conjure magic with just a flick of their wands, with picture books is a big part of the fun. Today’s book is perfect for read alouds this month and all through the year! 

Thanks go to Maverick Arts for sharing a copy of Which Nose for Witch? with me for review consideration. All opinions about the book are my own.

Which Nose for Witch?

Written by David Crosby | Illustrated by Carolina Coroa

 

When Grizelda was born, she was a pretty little baby with a button nose, “but now Grizelda’s growing up / A special day has come. / She’s off to choose her grown-up nose, / A super WITCHY one!” Her mom takes her to “‘The Conk Boutique,’” where she has shelves and shelves of noses to choose from. But how will Grizelda see how they look on her? Her mom tells her that with just a wave of her wand, she can cast a “‘nose-swap spell / To try it on your face!’”

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Image copyright Carolina Coroa, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts.

Griz picks out one that’s pointy with two warts on the tip and with a flick of her mother’s wand, she feels her nose growing. Her mom thinks Griz looks beautiful, but Griz imagines eating an ice-cream cone will not be easy. Next, she tries a hooked nose with bumps and bits of hair. Again her mom thinks Griz is gorgeous, she says, “‘You look COMPLETELY witchy!’” But “‘This nose feels really bad,’ says Griz. ‘It’s TINGLY and it’s ITCHY!’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-which-nose-for-witch-shop

Image copyright Carolina Coroa, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts.

She tried on nose after nose, drawing a crowd of onlookers, but none of them were right. Her mother marched her outside and laid down the law: she had “‘to choose a grown-up nose / To be a grown-up witch.’” Grizelda said, “‘Says who?’” and turned away. Then she saw something in the shop window and knew exactly which nose she wanted. It was perfect for eating ice cream and she knew it wouldn’t itch. Her mom was relieved and offered to “‘buy it right away.’” Griz called her mom over to the window to show her what she’d found.

Reflected in the glass was Griz’s own nose! “‘But NO witch keeps her baby nose,’” her mother said. “‘Oh Griz, this is the WORST.’” But Griz saw opportunities and nothing wrong with being first. So now while most witches still change their nose, “Griz feels grown-up and confident, / And LOVES her own reflection.”

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Image copyright Carolina Coroa, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts.

Just in time for Halloween, when kids’ thoughts turn to transforming themselves into all things witchy and scary, comes a humorous and bewitching story of confidence, self-love, and the courage to be yourself. David Crosby’s clever concept—that witches choose their own distinguishing facial feature as a rite of passage gives kids a lighthearted way to think about their own uniqueness in looks, personality, talents, thoughts, and other traits.

Along the way they can empathize with Grizelda as the noses she chooses just aren’t right for her. Grizelda’s pluck in resisting the pressure of the crowd and her mother’s scolding while realizing that she’s perfect just the way she is is a reassuring message for kids who might feel the undue burden of peer pressure or expectations.

Carolina Coroa’s charming illustrations of witches and warlocks sporting prominent noses include plenty of spooky details to keep kids enchanted. As a baby at home, Grizelda’s grandfather dangles a spider for her to play with while a crow sits on his shoulder and a Venus flytrap plant sits on a nearby table. Grown up and shopping for noses, Griz rides a broom, wears a spider in her hair, and completes her outfit with the requisite cape.

The shelves of noses, each in its own jar, will have readers stopping to choose their favorites—for themselves, their mom and dad, their siblings, and other family members and friends. Coroa’s image of Grizelda gazing into the shop window happy to have found the perfect nose is cunningly conceived to keep kids guessing until the surprise twist ending is revealed. The final illustration of a confident Grizelda taking her place in the sky with other grown-up witches will delight readers.

An enchanting and uplifting story to inspire kids to be true to themselves, Which Nose for Witch? is magical storytelling for the Halloween season and all year through for all kids on the path to growing up and self-discovery.

Ages 4 – 9 

Maverick Arts, 2021 | ISBN 978-1848867789

You can connect with David Crosby on Twitter.

To learn more about Carolina Coroa, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Get Ready for Halloween Activity

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Halloween  Masks and Coloring Pages

 

Discover how you’d look with a witch’s nose (and chin, hat, and all the rest) with this printable witch mask to color. Or maybe you’d rather be a robot! Why not try them both and then have fun with the two printable coloring pages.

Witch Mask | Robot Mask | Witch Coloring Page 1 | Witch Coloring Page 2

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You can find Which Nose for Witch? at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review