September 25 – It’s Adopt a Less-Adoptable Pet Week

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About the Holiday

Established by Petfinder, this week-long holiday aims to raise awareness of all those animals in shelters who, because of age, health, size, or even color, are overlooked for adoption. But these animals have a lot of love to give, and the bonds you can form with a special-needs or unusual pet can change your life. To learn more about the Adopt a Less-Adoptable Pet Week and how you can help deserving animals find a forever home throughout the year, visit Petfinder Pro. 

Thanks to Sleeping Bear Press for sending me a copy of Tails from the Animal Shelter for review consideration. All opinions about the book are my own.

Tails from the Animal Shelter

Written by Stephanie Shaw | Illustrated by Liza Woodruff

 

Welcome to the Humane Society Animal Shelter! The animals are waiting to meet you, and the staff are happy to introduce you to the wonderful animals who are available for adoption. While most animals who arrive at shelters across the country are dogs or cats, there are lots of other pets looking for a new home. Why do some animals come to live in a shelter? The book reveals many reasons. Among them are that “some of the animals are strays; some are rescued from natural disasters” and “some have been given up for adoption because their owners can no longer care for them.”

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Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Are you ready to find a new friend? If it’s a puppy you’re looking for, you’ll love Tinkle, who’s so excited to see you that he “cannot help but piddle.” But it’s okay. “Happy puppies always dribble….As time passes and pups grow, / This little guy won’t pee ‘hello.’” If you don’t know what type of dog is best for your family, the staff at the shelter can help match you to the perfect one.

Cats also make wonderful pets for many reasons. Whether you like long-haired or short-haired, large or small cats, you’ll find just the right fit for your family at the shelter. Not ready for a long-term commitment? You can look into fostering a newborn kitten to get them ready for adoption. What kinds of kittens will you find? All sorts, like Ariel, who says: “I’m an acrobat cat! / I can climb anywhere! / I’ll roll in a ball and then / leap to a chair!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-skunks

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

These dogs and puppies, cats and kittens are only a few of the animals that turn up needing a new home. Take Pooter, for example. Pooter is black and white and, despite the recognizable stripe down its back, does not stink. Skunks that make their way to shelters “have never lived in the wild” and have had surgery so they cannot make their “smelly spray.”

Veterinary advances have improved the lives of injured animals or animals with health problems. Animals with special needs can now be fitted with “rear-support leashes or wheelchairs” and “can live happily for many years.” If you can adopt “an animal with special needs [you] will bring a grateful and loyal pet into your family.” A popular pet that has some surprising talents, a rabbit can also be a top choice for people who live in a smaller home. Trained to use a litter box, rabbits “can live indoors just like cats do.” 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-special-needs-pets

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

If you live on a farm or have a lot of land in an area that allows for farm animals, you may be interested in Hamlet, who tells readers, “I am a sweet potbellied pig. / I started small but I grew BIG….I know some tricks. I’m neat and clean. / I’m many things. I’m just not… / lean.” Around the nation there are many “pigs, goats, sheep, and chickens [that] need new homes. There are over two hundred thousand horses alone rescued or surrendered to shelter care every year.” 

Along with detailed descriptions of the birds, reptiles, and senior animals that also make loving pets, the book is packed with information about how and why certain animals come to shelters and programs that sponsor a variety of animals and help get them ready for adoption. Back matter reveals how animal shelters were established, gives extensive tips on and issues to consider when adopting a shelter animal, lists ways people can help shelter animals even if they can’t adopt, and provides online resources for learning more and finding shelters in your area.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-rabbits

Image copyright Liza Woodruff, 2020, text copyright Stephanie Shaw, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

In her fascinating and accessible text, Stephanie Shaw combines poetry with facts and interesting tidbits about each type of animal to discuss why they make excellent pets for the right person or living condition. Her humorous, whimsical verses that accompany each category and introduce a particular animal will charm kids with a snapshot of the animal’s personality. Kids will also enjoy talking about how each name fits the animal.

Liza Woodruff’s cheery illustrations will enchant animal lovers with adorable images of funny, loving, and endearing animals happy to find a forever home. The joy that pets bring to a family is evident as kids hug, play with, and react to their pets.

An excellent introduction to shelter animals and pet ownership, Tails from the Animal Shelter is highly recommended for any family thinking about adopting a pet as well as for young animal lovers and kids interested in veterinary medicine or volunteering to help animals. The book would also make a favorite addition to school and public library collections.

Ages 5 – 8

Sleeping Bear Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1534110489

Discover more about Stephanie Shaw and her books on her website.

To learn more about Liza Woodruff, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Adopt a Less-Adoptable Pet Week Activity

CPB - Pig Day pigs

Roly Poly Spool Potbellied Pig and Piglets

 

Get ready to have fun making this cute and easy craft! Ham it up with your own pig and piglets who can keep you company on your desk, near your bed or anywhere it’s fun to play!

Supplies

  • Printable Pigs Ears Template
  • 2 ½-inch wooden spoon, available from craft stores
  • 1-inch wooden spool, available from craft stores
  • Pink yarn, I used a wide-strand yarn
  • Pink fleece or felt
  • Pink craft paint
  • Pink 5/8-inch or 1-inch flat button with two holes
  • Pink 3/8-inch flat button with two holes
  • Paint brush
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Black marker

CPB - Pig Day with spools (2)

Directions

  1. Print Pigs Ears Template
  2. Trace the ears onto the fleece or felt and cut them out.
  3. Paint the spool with the pink paint
  4. Let spool dry
  5. When the spool is dry, glue the ears to the spool, letting the ears stick up over the rim of the spool.
  6. Wrap yarn in straight layers around spool until the body of the pig is a little bigger than the end of the spool, which will be the face
  7. Cut yarn off skein and glue the end to the body
  8. To make the nose, glue the button over the hole in the middle of the spool
  9. Mark the eyes and mouth with a marker
  10. To make the tail for the large pig, cut a 4-inch long piece of yarn. Tie a triple knot in the yarn (or a knot big enough to fill the hole in the spool). Then tie a single knot near the other end of the yarn. Insert the large knot into the spool’s hole at the back of the pig. Trim the yarn in front of the second knot as needed.
  11. To make the tail for the piglets, tie a single knot in the yarn and another single knot below the first. Insert one of the single knots into the hole. Trim yarn as needed.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tails-from-the-animal-shelter-cover

You can find Tails from the Animal Shelter at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

 

Picture Book Review

 

August 31 – We Love Memoirs Day

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About the Holiday

In 2013, Victoria Twead and Alan Parks, who have written about their life stories themselves, established today’s holiday to foster a warm and welcoming community for readers and writers of memoirs. The idea took off and now We Love Memoirs Day brings the art and heart of this personal form of writing to people across the world. If you like to read memoirs, today’s a terrific day to visit your local bookstore or library and pick one up. If you’ve ever thought of penning the story of your own life and/or family, today’s holiday gives you the perfect opportunity to start!

Memoirs of a Tortoise

Written by Devin Scillian | Illustrated by Tim Bowers

It’s April and Oliver the tortoise is in his garden with his pet, Ike. Ike has brought him “a plate of lettuce and dandelions and a bright, crunchy apple.” Oliver loves Ike and he can tell that Ike loves him too by the way he runs his hand over his shell. “This, this is life and it’s beautiful,” Oliver thinks. In May, Ike throws a stick that Oliver will never fetch, and they laugh over this old, favorite joke. Oliver thinks, “Eighty times I’ve watched spring arrive in the garden, and it’s always perfect.” He spies a bit of red on the other side of the garden and ambles off to investigate.

It’s June by the time he reaches the hibiscus grove. Oliver enjoys taking things slow—just like Ike does. July and August pass with special moments of companionship and fun. As September comes, life begins slowing down. “The days are getting shorter” and Ike is “taking lots of naps in the garden.” Oliver enjoys having Ike nearby and decides that “the next time he throws the stick, I’m going to fetch it.”

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Image copyright Tim Bowers, 2020, text copyright Devin Scillian, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

October arrives, but the regular routine of the garden has been broken. Oliver hasn’t seen Ike or been fed in several days. Oliver makes due with pumpkin from the garden, but he misses Ike. By November, Oliver is “afraid Ike is gone.” The idea makes him sad. After all, he thinks, Ike was still so young. He was 80 years old.” Oliver had thought they would grow old together and wonders where Ike is. In December, Oliver decides to go talk to someone who has more experience than he does—his mother, who is 137 years old.

It takes Oliver until February to cross the ten gardens between Ike’s house and where his mother lives. When Oliver’s mother sees her son, “she smiles wide and her eyes sparkle.” Oliver tells his mother that Ike is gone. She understands his sadness and tells him how much Ike loved him. But Oliver wonders why Ike couldn’t stay with him.

Oliver’s mother explains “we only get to have pets in our lives for a little while.” Then she offers words of comfort: “And when they’re gone, we count all those beautiful days we were lucky enough to have them with us. We’re so lucky.”

Oliver has enjoyed his visit with his mother, but in March he’s on his way back home. When he arrives in his own garden, the door of the house opens. Oliver turns instinctively expecting to see Ike, but it’s Ted, Ike’s son. He brings Oliver “a tray of lettuce and dandelions and a bright, crunchy apple.” He rubs Oliver’s shell just like Ike used to do and tells Oliver he’s glad he came home. Ted tosses a stick and the two laugh. “This, for me and Ted, this is life,” Oliver thinks. And he knows his mother was right when she said they were so lucky.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-memoirs-of-a-tortoise-july

Image copyright Tim Bowers, 2020, text copyright Devin Scillian, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Devin Scillian’s Memoirs of a Tortoise has it all—humor, poignancy, and a life lesson about the precious moments we share with loved ones. Using the longevity of tortoises, Scillian flips the script on the pet and human relationship with tender and emotional effect. When Ike passes away and Oliver is confused and sad, he confidently sets out to find answers and comfort from someone he can trust—his mother. The ten gardens between their homes may not seem far to us, but to Ike and his mom it’s the equivalent of towns, states, or even countries for us.

This seamless blending of the tortoises’ experience and that of readers’ is both the charm and genius of Scillian’s story. Oliver’s straightforward comments and questions about loss echo those of children and will resonate with them. As Oliver’s mother reminds him to enjoy every day and be thankful for the time he spends with his pets and as Ted enters his life, readers will understand that her advice to embrace all the parts of life applies to them as well.

Tim Bowers’ endearing Oliver is a sweet companion on this journey through a formative experience. As Oliver spends time and enjoys inside jokes with kindly Ike, readers will recognize not only the pet and owner bond but the relationship between children and grandparents. Bowers’ lush depictions of Ike’s garden where he and Oliver play or sit quietly side by side portray the beauty of life that Oliver’s mother so wisely recognizes. Ike’s slowing down and passing away are drawn with sensitivity and through images that allow adults and children to discuss facts and feelings about death, mourning, acceptance, and the cycles of life.

Uplifting and full of wisdom, Memoirs of a Tortoise, is highly recommended for home bookshelves and a must for school and public library collections.

Ages 6 – 9 

Sleeping Bear Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1534110199

Discover more about Devin Scillian, his books, journalism, music, and more on his website.

To learn more about Tim Bowers, his books, and his art, visit his website.

We Love Memoirs Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-turtle-shell-game

Follow the Turtles! Game

You can make this fun game from recycled materials and a little creativity! When you’re finished making the turtle shells, have fun guessing where the marble, bead or bean is hiding!

Supplies

  • Cardboard egg carton
  • Green tissue paper in different hues
  • Green construction or craft paper
  • A marble, bead, or bean
  • Glue
  • Scissors

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-turtle-game

Directions

  1. Cut the egg carton apart into individual cups. You will need 3 cups for each game made.
  2. Cut the rims of the cups so they sit flat on a table.
  3. If the cups have open sides, fit two cups inside one another to fill the gaps
  4. Cut the tissue paper into small shapes
  5. Brush glue on a cup (I used a paper towel to apply glue)
  6. Cover the egg cup with pieces of tissue paper. Repeat with other cups.
  7. Let dry
  8. Cut a head and feet from the green craft paper
  9. Tape or glue the edges of head and feet to the inside of the cups
  10. Add a face to the head

To play the game:

  1. Line up the cups on a table
  2. Put a bead, bean, or marble under one of the cups
  3. Show the other player which cup the object is under
  4. Quickly move the cups around each other several times
  5. Ask the other player which cup they think the object is under
  6. Take turns playing

Extra Game: Make three more and play turtle tic-tac-toe! 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-memoirs-of-a-tortoise-cover

You can find Memoirs of a Tortoise at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookseller, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

August 26 – International Dog Day

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About the Holiday

International Dog Day was established in 2004 by Colleen Paige to raise awareness of all the dogs who need forever homes. The day also celebrates dogs of all breeds and honors the work of these faithful friends, whether they are family pets or specially trained as service dogs, police dogs, or search-and-rescue dogs. This month is also National Family Fun Month, and as pet owners know, the special times we spend with our furry, feathered, or other friends add up to lots of family fun. 

This Old Dog

Written by Martha Brockenbrough | Illustrated by Gabriel Alborozo

 

In the morning, old dog opens his eyes and greets the sun. “His bones are sore but his heart is strong.” He leaves his bed and stretches. He has breakfast and then asks for a walk. But there’s a new baby in the house, and while old dog likes to take things slow, “the speed of life since the girl was born is fast, fast, fast…” and his walks are too.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-old-dog-morning

Image copyright Gabriel Alborozo, 2020, text copyright Martha Brockenbrough, 2020. Courtesy of Levine Querido.

When he gets home, he “drifts to sleep in a stripe of sun and dreams of days gone by….Of long walks and deep sniffs.” When he wakes up, he wishes he had a friend who saw grass and leaf piles and stones the way he did; someone he could go on nice long walks with. But there is no one. Until…the girl takes one shaky step and then another and another “all the way to him.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-old-dog-dreams

Image copyright Gabriel Alborozo, 2020, text copyright Martha Brockenbrough, 2020. Courtesy of Levine Querido.

Now “old dog and small girl walk side by side.” They stop in the grass and “roll down the hill.” She plays with old dog and makes him feel young again. His heart and his tail go “THUMP-THUMP!” Her feet go “THUMP-THUMP!” That night they fall asleep in the same strip of moonlight and “meet in a dream…” where they “walk side by side through the world, the wonderful world.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-old-dog-leaf

Image copyright Gabriel Alborozo, 2020, text copyright Martha Brockenbrough, 2020. Courtesy of Levine Querido.

You don’t need to own a dog for Martha Brockenbrough’s story to melt your heart. Her short, straightforward sentences are carried on a leisurely, dreamy rhythm, giving them emotional impact and allowing readers to relive the good days, when there was all the time in the world, with old dog. Her lyrical language is endearingly dog-centric, but when the girl comes on the scene, readers will see that each example of old dog’s favorite things also applies to toddlers and young children. That old dog gets to slow down and enjoy life at his speed with the little girl may bring a tear to adult readers while kids will embrace the spontaneity and unspoken understanding between these two kindred spirits. Perfectly paced and with specific details borne of love for dogs and children, Brockenbrough’s This Old Dog offers the comfort of enduring friendship and the joy of discovering—and rediscovering—the world with a loved one.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-old-dog-side-by-side

Image copyright Gabriel Alborozo, 2020, text copyright Martha Brockenbrough, 2020. Courtesy of Levine Querido.

Gabriel Alborozo’s small, long-haired dog, gray and slowed by age yet still lively in spirit is as cute as they come. The front endpaper, which shows a dog’s-eye-view of a man and a very pregnant woman setting up a nursery gives children a hint of the changes to come in old dog’s home. As old dog is introduced, scattered toys and a photograph of a little girl on the windowsill show the progression of time. From the adults’ rushing legs to the first glimpse of the girl walking, each spread depicts old dog’s perspective, mirroring the emotional pull of the text.

What old dog wants in a walk and what he dreams of in his afternoon nap are contrasted with his new reality with images of his collar being tugged by the leash left, right, and forward as he stops to sniff the grass or listen to the breeze. In his sweet remembrances of past carefree days, old dog has no leash. Readers will be cheered to see that as he and the little girl play together he once again is let off the leash to share his old and her new favorite activities. Alborozo’s delicate lines and cartoon-inspired images are just right for portraying old dog’s dreams, emotions, and special times shared with the little girl. Humorous touches and old dog’s expressive face add visual depth and understanding to this special tale.

Moving, sweet, and reaffirming, This Old Dog is a must and will quickly become a favorite on home, classroom, and public library bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 7

Levine Querido, 2020 | ISBN 978-1646140107

Discover more about Martha Brockenbrough and her books on her website.

To learn more about Gabriel Alborozo, his books, and his art, visit his website.

International Dog Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-i-love-dogs-wordsearch-puzzle-shorter-size

I Love Dogs! Word Search Puzzle

 

If you love dogs, you’ll have fun discovering the names of eighteen dog breeds in this printable word search puzzle!

I Love Dogs! Word Search Puzzle | I Love Dogs! Word Search Solution

For younger kids, here’s a matching puzzle!

CPB - Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

 

Each of the puppies has a friend. Can you match them up based on one trait? There may be multiple right answers! Why do you think the dogs you chose go together in this printable puzzle?

Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-old-dog-cover

You can find This Old Dog at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million 

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound | The Neverending Bookshop (preorder before September 1 to receive a signed book and special dog tag necklace)

Picture Book Review

 

June 26 – National Take Your Dog to Work Day

 

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About the Holiday

In 1996 Pet Sitters International established Take Your Dog to Work Day as a time to raise awareness of the pets left home all day by themselves with no stimulation. The organization was also dedicated to promoting adoption from local and humane shelters. Over the years the idea of Take Your Dog to Work Day has grown in popularity. This year our pets have been our constant companions at work, providing their own kind of encouragement and always a bit of entertainment. To celebrate today’s holiday, give your “office mate” a little extra treat!

Dogs and their People

By Anne Lambelet

 

When the day is fine, a girl likes “to take the long way home from school” and watch people and their dogs. Some people have both babies and puppies, while others share their advanced age with their loyal hound. “Some dogs and their people look alike, and others could not be more different, but however they look, each person “seems to have found their perfect match.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dogs-and-their-people-school

Copyright Anne Lambelet, 2019, courtesy of annelambelet.com.

Take Cordelia Vanderlay, the painter, and her dog Fluffernutter Vanderlay, who loves to make prints of her paws. Or Jennette and Lisette, who are twins, but very different. While Jennette likes to wear sleek black attire, her sister loves things that are frilly. And their dogs—a smooth dark greyhound and a fluffy, groomed standard poodle—are perfect mirrors of their owners. And of course there’s “Lord Banberry and his schnauzer, O’Grady,” who both sport the same impressive, well-trimmed, downturned mustachios.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dogs-and-their-people-park

Copyright Anne Lambelet, 2019, courtesy of annelambelet.com.

A young hot-dog lover, accompanied by his wiener-dog dachshund, buys an after-school treat from Freddie McDarrow and his smiling pup. Yes, “watching dogs and their people is fun,” the girl says, “because I can always tell they are best friends.” But she’s always happiest to come home to her best friend…can you guess who?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dogs-and-their-people-groomer

Copyright Anne Lambelet, 2019, courtesy of annelambelet.com.

Anne Lambelet’s story charms as she introduces dog-and-owner pairs who look alike, act alike, or are polar opposites but still besties. As author and illustrator, Lambelet perfectly melds the joy of people- and pet-watching with a Victorian elegance that sets her story in an enchanting universe. Readers will get a kick out of Lambelet’s flowery names—both human and pet—that add to the ambience and seem as perfect as the friendships.

Lambelet’s unique mixed-media style of illustration, which highlights each owner and their dog—often with simple props surrounded by airy white space, but also in several two-page spreads that give kids a glimpse into the girl’s city—brings texture, interesting perspectives, and movement to the pages. Her lovely, muted color palette is as refreshing as the glow of autumn, and her fashionable city dwellers and their equally well-turned-out pooches could easily have just stepped out of a fashion magazine. Lambelet’s surprise ending will delight readers and gives the other side a sweet, heart-felt nod.

A jaunty trip through the joys of pet-and-people friendships, Dogs and their People will be a much-asked-for favorite on home, classroom, and public library bookshelves and would be a fun spark for or take along on a people- and pet-watching walk.

Ages 4 – 8

Page Street Kids, 2019 | ISBN 978-1624146893

Discover more about Anne Lambelet, her books, and her art on her website.

National Take Your Dog to Work Day Activity

CPB - Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

 

Each of the puppies has a friend. Can you match them up based on one trait? There may be multiple right answers! Why do you think the dogs you chose go together in this printable puzzle?

Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dogs-and-their-people-cover

You can find Dogs and Their People at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop| IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 24 – Bubble Kisses Book Tour Stop

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bubble-kisses-cover

About the Holiday

Bubble Kisses

Presented by Vanessa Williams | Illustrated by Tara Nicole Whitaker

 

A little girl is playing pirates in her room with her special pet goldfish, Sal. As she holds up Sal’s bowl during the classroom pet show, the little girl admits that Sal can’t “bark like a dog, scratch like a cat, or jump like a frog” the way the other kids’ pets can. And Sal can’t do things that wild animals can do either. But Sal does have one amazing talent that makes the girl love her so much. She explains that Sal “gives me bubble kisses, bubble kisses as she swims by in the water. She never misses with her bubble kisses. And I’m so glad I got her.”

What’s so special about these bubble kisses? They’re more than a little magical! In fact, they transform the little girl into a mermaid and her bedroom into an underwater world where other mermaids, fish, sea turtles, porpoises and other sea creatures greet her with excitement. Watching the mermaids swim and play together, the girl is so happy that she’s included because “from people’s lives such things are missing as bub-bub-bub-bub-bubble-kisses.”

A sign points the way to a concert, and the five mermaids lead the little girl and Sal to a pirate ship sitting atop a blue whale. Music floats on the waves, and as they grow closer they see mermaid couples and even some merkids dancing. The little girl holds Sal’s fins as they twirl around too before entering the pirate ship, where the concert is taking place. A beautiful mermaid is singing, backed up by two of the five mermaids as well as porpoises and sea turtles on saxophone, a seal on the drums, two angelfish on trumpets, and one cool porpoise playing the bass.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bubble-kisses-kisses

Image copyright Tara Nicole Whitaker, 2020, text copyright Vanessa Williams, 2020. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

As the band plays on, the star, her backup singers, and the other mermaids hold the little girl’s hands and Sal’s fins and swim in a circle of friendship. But the little girl and Sal are growing tired. They drift off to sleep in a big bubble as the singer sits nearby watching over them. Then they’re back home. Sal snoozes in her pirate ship-decorated bowl, and the little girl takes one more peek at her friend before dozing off in her cozy bed, reminded once again how lucky she is because “from people’s lives such things are missing as bub-bub-bub-bubble-kisses. With the funny, lovely Sal.”

Bubble Kisses is both a story and a jazzy, toe-tapping song that will have little ones singing and dancing along with every reading. Included with the book is a CD of Vanessa Williams singing Bubble Kisses plus a link to a digital download of the song.

Vanessa Williams’ delightful story is full of enchantment, imagination, and the love children have for their pets. Little readers will be charmed as one bubble kiss magically transforms the little girl into a mermaid and she and Sal begin an adventure together. Repeated phrases make it easy for kids to join in during story times or while singing, and the effervescent “Bub-bub-bub-bub-bubble kisses” will have kids giggling and asking for more.

Tara Nicole Whitaker’s violet-and-blue-hued digital illustrations are as sweet as cotton candy and transport readers into a world of imagination based on the little girl’s favorite activity: playing pirates in her sea-themed bedroom. Kids will have fun matching the décor and toys in the girl’s room to her underwater escapade. The diverse group of mermaids who invite the little girl to the concert are enthusiastic and welcoming. Whitaker’s pirate ship makes a fun venue for the fanciful concert, and the singer’s tender attention as the little girl and Sal drift off to sleep will remind readers that they too are watched over with love.

Ages 3 – 8

Sterling Children’s Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1454938347

Discover more about Vanessa Williams and her multifaceted career, visit her website.

To learn more about Tara Nicole Whitaker, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Dive into this Bubble Kisses book trailer!

Vanessa Willams presents Bubble Kisses (40 second trailer) from Sterling Publishing on Vimeo.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bubble-kisses-cover

You can find Bubble Kisses at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

 

Picture Book Review

 

 

June 18 – National Splurge Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-you-dont-want-a-dragon-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was instituted in 1994 by Adrienne Sioux Koopersmith, a self-proclaimed “eventologist” who has created more than 1,900 of these quirky holidays we celebrate, as a way to encourage people to spend a little extra and help the economy. While this year splurging monetarily may not be possible, there are lots of other ways to enjoy an extra treat or experience a larger-than-life moment. And if your child’s wishes run to wild, mythical pets, then today is the day to indulge them—with today’s book, of course!

By Jakki Licare

You Don’t Want a Dragon!

Written by Ame Dyckman | Illustrated by Liz Climo

 

“NOW you’ve done it! I TOLD YOU not to wish for a dragon!” warns the narrator to the little boy who has just wished for a pet dragon at a fountain. The little boy can’t imagine anything better, but the narrator chides him. Doesn’t he remember what happened when he wished for unicorns last time?

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Image copyright Liz Climo, 2020, text copyright Ame Dyckman, 2020. Courtesy of Little Brown Books for Young Readers.

The unicorn had been destructive and even held a crazy unicorn party. Plus, the unicorn left a lot of smelly cupcake surprises around the house. The narrator continues to warn him, but the boy is having too much fun flying on his dragon. The narrator concedes that it might be fun at first, but cautions him that it won’t be worth it in the end because dragons love to chase things and never stop drooling!

The dragon smiles sneakily next to a lit grill holding a roll of toilet paper while the narrator informs us “and what the stories never mention is . . .WHERE charcoal comes from. Don’t mention this at your next barbecue. Trust me.” The little boy works endlessly to keep the dragon under control and to clean up after it. The narrator tells the boy he’s doing a good job, but he’s in for some big trouble. Dragons grow and grow and grow and  become enormous! 

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Image copyright Liz Climo, 2020, text copyright Ame Dyckman, 2020. Courtesy of Little Brown Books for Young Readers.

“You just don’t have the space for a dragon. In your heart, yes. But in your house . . . no.” The narrator advises the little boy to go back to the water fountain and wish the dragon away. The boy does as he’s told with a bit of regret. As he’s returning home, he discovers a Pet Adoption Day event going on and finds an adorable hamster. The narrator and the boy both agree that the hamster will be the perfect pet.

The little boy brings his hamster home and places him into a cage. He’s cleaning up the mess left from the dragon and unicorns, when the narrator points out that the lid isn’t on the cage! The hamster escapes and comes across a smelly cupcake surprise left by the unicorn. The narrator warns the hamster not to eat it, but it is too late. The hamster turns into a large unicorn-hamster and wishes for a unicorn-hamster party! 

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Image copyright Liz Climo, 2020, text copyright Ame Dyckman, 2020. Courtesy of Little Brown Books for Young Readers.

In this laugh-out-loud sequel, Ame Dyckman’s narrator is trying once again to convince our young protagonist to wish away another mythical pet. Dyckman does recap the first book, but I do recommend that readers check out You Don’t Want a Unicorn first so you can really enjoy the jokes.  Dyckman’s conversational style of narration brings the story to a new level of hilarity. The narrator not only admits that flying a dragon is fun, but dramatically concedes “FINE! It’s AWESOME, too, okay?!”  If your young readers are like my children they will appreciate the potty humor that the ending joke is hinged around. Yep, the cupcakes in this book are not for eating! The best part about the book, however, is the nice message of the importance of adopting animals. Dyckman’s main character has finally realized that while unicorns and dragons may be amazing creatures, they are not ideal pets. There are many animals needing homes who are tamable and loveable!

Liz Climo’s soft-colored illustrations of the boy’s adventures really highlight the fun. When Climo’s characters’ reactions are paired with Dyckman’s on-point narrations, the result is a hilarious adventure. The boy’s surprised expression at the charcoal on the barbecue and the dragon’s sneaky smile while holding the toilet paper will ensure giggles from readers of all ages. Climo is a champion at using the white space to the story’s advantage. The white space surrounding the dragon’s drool, for example, emphasizes the fact the boy is physically stuck in the drool! When the dragon grows to an enormous size, Climo cleverly uses the entire page to show that even the book can barely contain this dragon. 

A fun adventure that both kids and adults will enjoy reading over and over, You Don’t Want a Dragon! is a great choice for enchanted or mythical story times as well as for placing on a non-magical bookshelf.

Ages 4 – 8 

Little Brown Books for Young Readers, 2020 | ISBN 978-0316535809

Discover more about Ame Dyckman and her books on her website.

To learn more about Liz Climo, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Splurge Day Activity

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Fiery Dragon Craft

Watch out this project is hot! Create realistic looking fire to add to your own personalized dragon with the printable template and some simple supplies!

Supplies

  • Printable Dragon Coloring Sheet
  • Markers/colored pencils/ crayons
  • Cotton Balls
  • Red and Yellow Paint (I used craft acrylic paint)
  • Paintbrush
  • Glue

Directions

  1. Take your cotton balls and pull them apart. 

  2. Paint your stringy cotton balls red. The cotton ball will stick to your paint brush if you use strokes so use a dabbing a motion.  Younger children will need an adult to hold the cotton balls down.

  3. Let the red paint dry and then add in some yellow. Dont forget to dab. Let them dry

  4. Print out and color in your dragon

  5. When your paint is dried, glue down the stringy cotton balls so it is coming out of the dragon’s mouth.

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You can find You Don’t Want a Dragon! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 19 – It’s National Pet Month and Interview with Sarah Kurpiel

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About the Holiday

Pets give us unconditional love, provide companionship, and add entertainment and fun to our lives. This month is set aside to focus on our pets. To celebrate spend extra time with your furry friend, make sure they have everything they need to stay healthy, and give them a little extra treat now and then. This year, our pets may be feeling stressed from stay-at-home restrictions. To help, try to keep your pet’s routines as normal as possible. Dogs may benefit from extra walks––just like Maple in today’s story!

I received a copy of Lone Wolf from Greenwillow Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. 

Lone Wolf

By Sarah Kurpiel

 

Maple, a Siberian husky, loved living with the Parkers. He loved playing tug-of-war with Jax, reading with Avery, extra treats from Mom, and especially long walks with everyone. “But on her walks, people would say… ‘Dude, that dog looks like a wolf.’” Some little kids clung to their mom’s leg when they saw her, some older people asked if maybe she wasn’t just a little bit wolf, and even babies shouted “‘WOLF! WOLF! WOLF!’”

The Parkers tried to explain the differences between Maple and a wolf, but eventually, “even Maple had her doubts.” After all, when she compared herself to other dogs, she saw that so many had floppy ears or lots of fluff or handsome spots. She wasn’t like them at all. Plus, she was good at digging, howling, and hunting just like a wolf.

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Copyright Sarah Kurpiel, 2020, courtesy of Greenwillow Books.

She began to think that she belonged in the wild, and one day when the gate was left open, she bounded out into the woods. But here the ground was hard, not soft like the Parker’s garden; squirrels were faster and harder to catch than Avery’s shoes; and sticks were pretty boring without Jax. Being a wolf was not as much fun as it seemed. As nighttime came and the sky darkened, Maple decided to head home.

On the way, she saw a flashlight and behind it familiar faces. Someone was looking for her. It was the Parkers—her pack! Now when people call Maple a wolf, she doesn’t have doubts. She knows just who she is and exactly where she belongs.

Sarah Kurpiel’s multilayered story about a husky who is often mistaken for a wolf will delight dog and pet lovers as it gently introduces the ideas of identity, self-doubt, and self-discovery. Her charming storytelling provides an excellent opportunity for adults and kids to discuss these important topics of individual growth with the backdrop of a supportive family. Children, familiar with being peppered by questions about what they’re doing and who they want to be (as opposed to who they are) as well as by comparisons to others, will relate to Maple. Maple’s exploration of what she considers her wolf-like abilities is humorous and models a positive self-analysis that is honest and non-judgmental while also embracing one’s unique qualities.

Kurpiel’s lovely color palette and rounded shapes are fresh and welcoming while her use of directional lines allows readers to dash along with Maple from one enchanting detail to another. Her use of various perspectives puts kids in Maple’s point of view while providing depth to this enthusiastic pup’s experience. Maple is adorable, and his wondering nature is clearly visible in his expressive face. Kurpiel’s images of family love begin on the copyright page with sweet framed family pictures, many of which include Maple. Avery, who is shown using a power wheelchair, is a welcome portrayal of a child with a disability. The final snapshot of the Parker family and Maple snuggling together is heartwarming and reminds readers that individual attributes are what make each person so special.

Touching and uplifting, Lone Wolf will charm children and adults anew with every reading. The book would make a favorite addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 8

Greenwillow Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-0062943828

Discover more about Sarah Kurpiel and her art on her website.

You can download a Lone Wolf Activity Kit from HarperCollins here.

Meet Sarah Kurpiel

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Sarah Kurpiel is a librarian and artist inspired by nature and animals. She grew up in the Midwest with a Siberian husky named Mikayla. Consequently, most of her childhood was spent removing dog fur from her clothes. Lone Wolf is her first book. Sarah Kurpiel lives with her family (which includes her wonderfully goofy dog, Roxie) in Downers Grove, Illinois.

I was really excited to have a chance to talk with Sarah Kurpiel about her debut picture book, how it came to be, her illustration work, and more! Jack and Steve, who are also dog lovers, are back with lots of questions for Sarah too.

After reading––and loving––Lone Wolf, they wondered:

Do you have a dog?

Yes! My family has a dog named Roxie. We adopted her from a local animal shelter. We think she’s part Border Collie and part Retriever. She loves herding us around and rolling in the grass.

We have a miniature poodle. What breed of dog is your favorite?

Miniature Poodles are adorable! My favorite breed of dog is giant by comparison: the Borzoi. Borzois look a bit like extra-large, extra-furry greyhounds.

 Have you ever seen or heard a wolf?

I’ve never seen or heard a wolf in the wild, but I have seen Mexican Gray Wolves in a zoo. The Mexican Gray Wolf is one of the most endangered wolf subspecies in the world. Thankfully, there are recovery programs working to change that.

We’ve been taking our dog on lots of walks (just like the Parker family!) during this quarantine. What have you’ve been doing to keep busy?

I’ve been hanging out with my family and our pets, reading, catching up on Star Trek, and drawing lots and lots of cats for my next picture book.

Hi Sarah! Jack and Steve had so many terrific questions! Maple, the star of Lone Wolf, really connects with readers on so many levels. Through your story you introduce a wonderful way for kids and adults to talk about identity and belonging. This issue is really important, especially as children are developing their self-confidence and self-esteem. What was the spark for this story? What do you hope readers will take away from your book?

The main character in Lone Wolf, Maple, is inspired by my childhood dog, Mikayla, a Siberian husky who had loads of personality. As anyone with a husky would probably attest, huskies often get compared to wolves. My dog was no exception. When translating this idea into a picture book, I asked myself, “What would a dog think about people comparing her to a wolf again and again?” I found I could relate to her feelings of self-doubt, as I think many people can. Lone Wolf is a cute, funny story, but like you mentioned, identity and belonging are at its heart. I hope readers will take away self-confidence to stay true to themselves despite assumptions others might make about them.

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Lone Wolf is your debut picture book. Can you take readers on the book’s journey from idea to being published? Have you always wanted to illustrate and write children’s books?

When I was a kid, I loved to draw, but I don’t remember dreaming about becoming an illustrator. I don’t think I even knew it was a job! Throughout my life, drawing has always been a relaxing hobby. Years ago, I made a few comic strips about my family’s husky just for fun. Then, in 2018, while brainstorming picture book ideas, I reflected back on those comic strips. The one about wolf comparisons had potential for layers, but it wasn’t a story. So, over the course of a few weeks, I built out the idea, created a dummy, and sent it off to the agents who were considering representing me (and who later became my co-agents).

They sent me a few rounds of feedback, which pushed me to develop the story further. The point-of-view moved from first-person to third-person and the story arc evolved. I revised on and off for about three months. Then the story went out on submission, and I (very happily!) accepted Greenwillow’s publication offer. In the weeks that followed, I revised the dummy based on the editor’s helpful feedback before getting the go-ahead to start the final art. I learned a lot during this process that I expect will help me navigate future projects.

Just as you do, the little girl in this story uses a wheelchair. Can you discuss what it means to disabled children to see themselves in the books they read? Can you discuss the impact that having disabled characters in books for all ages has on society as a whole?

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I’m glad you noticed this connection! When I was 11, I was diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy, and by 18, I had transitioned to a power wheelchair. The character Avery in Lone Wolf also uses a power wheelchair. She isn’t the main character. She’s just a girl who’s part of a family that has an awesome dog. Her presence is only notable because we don’t usually see kids in power wheelchairs in picture books. In fact, I can’t think of a single fiction picture book that includes a kid who uses a power wheelchair. I’m not saying there aren’t any out there, but if there are, I haven’t come across them yet. Kids who use manual wheelchairs are represented more often, but they’re still few and far between. And despite good intentions, some representations of disability are problematic. I think it’s important for kids with mobility disabilities to see themselves in happy stories where they are neither problems to solve nor sources of inspiration. For society as a whole, it helps normalize disability.

I love your illustration style that often mixes lovely rounded shapes with equally lovely lines, as a self-taught illustrator how did you develop your style?

I learned to draw when I was younger by sketching everything around me and from books I checked out from my public library. In 2016, I started drawing digitally. It opened up so many new possibilities. I started drawing every day, following illustrators on Instagram, thinking consciously about what made me like one illustrator’s work more than another, and taking part in a few fun, informal art challenges on Instagram. In 2017, one such challenge (a Harry Potter 20th Anniversary challenge, to be precise!) led me to draw a hippogriff. I tried some digital brushes I hadn’t used before and very desaturated colors. In that moment, I had never liked something I drew as much as that simple, imperfect hippogriff. It felt right. So I continued in that direction, drawing animals using digital dry media brushes, desaturated colors, flowy shapes, weathered edges, and sketchy, wobbly lines until, after a while, it was my style—and still is, at least for now!

As I looked at the portfolio of your art, I was moved by how uplifting the scenes are. In so many of them, the animals are looking into the sky or tenderly interacting with another animal or a person. Can you talk a little about the themes of your art and the colors you choose? What about nature inspires you the most?

It’s true! I love drawing animals looking up at the sky. It’s my go-to subject these days! Like many people, I’m drawn to the vastness of nature: the night sky, the ocean, mountains, wide open fields. A few years ago, I visited the Grand Canyon and was not prepared for how awe-inspiring it was. The vastness of nature stirs up all kinds of emotions and memories, and also a sense of interconnectedness. I like placing people and animals in those environments. For those drawings, I tend to use quiet, desaturated colors, which I’m naturally drawn to. But there’s this other side to me that’s enamored with cute, funny, whimsical characters. Lately, I’ve been trying to use vibrant colors when I draw them. So I feel like there’s these two separate sides to my work. I like both, so do both.

When you’re not drawing or writing, you can also be found working as a librarian. What are your favorite parts of your job? How exciting will it be to see your own book on the shelf and share it with patrons?

I’m an academic librarian focused in digital services, so what I enjoy most is simplifying processes and improving access (which might sound pretty dull!). My first library job was a cataloger, so I was weirdly excited to see Lone Wolf’s Library of Congress MARC record and my Cutter number at the end of the call number for the first time. It’ll be gratifying to see my book on library shelves one day when the pandemic subsides. I’ll probably pull out my phone and snap a picture!

What are you most looking forward to in sharing your book with readers? Although you’re just getting started, what has been the best part of becoming a published children’s author?

I’d love to show kids how to draw the main character, Maple, themselves. When I was in 2nd grade, my teacher demonstrated on the chalkboard a simple way to draw a face. I still remember exactly how she did it. After that, I became obsessed with drawing stylized faces and that never really went away for me. I’d love to spark a little creativity like my teacher did for me.

So far, the best part of becoming a published author/illustrator is feeling empowered to talk more openly about my interests. Few people outside of my immediate family knew I draw. It’s also been wonderful to make connections with people I never would have met otherwise.

What’s up next for you?

My next picture book will be about another popular pet: cats! I’m busily working on the final art right now.

Thanks, Sarah, for sharing so much about your life and work! I wish you all the best with Lone Wolf and can’t wait to see your next book.

You can connect with Sarah Kurpiel on

Her website | Instagram | Twitter

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You can find Lone Wolf at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Anderson’s Bookshop (Sarah’s local indie) | Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review