May 14 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-cover

About the Holiday

Reading is great all the time, but this month you like to be seen actually with the book in hand laughing at a funny line, shivering over a mysterious setting, or maybe even tearing up over a plot twist. Throughout the month, authors, illustrators, actors and actresses, athletes, business people, teachers, and students all upload pictures of themselves reading to encourage others to discover the joys of reading. To learn more and find resources for teachers and librarians to download and posters to order, visit the Get Caught Reading website.

Three Little Monkeys

Written by Quentin Blake | Illustrated by Emma Chichester Clark

 

Whenever Hilda Snibbs came home, the first thing she did was call out “‘I’m home! Where are you?’” You  might think she was talking to her kids, her dog, or her cat, but she was actually addressing her three little monkeys whose “names were Tim and Sam and Lulu.” Hilda was sure to give them healthy snacks because “they were very lively.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-snack

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

One day when Hilda went to the grocery store, the monkeys grew bored. They opened the hall closet and “threw everything into the hall.” They opened the umbrellas, tore the laces from all the shoes, and plucked all the feathers from Hilda’s favorite hat. When Hilda came home and saw the mess she had one thing to say: “‘I’m really very disappointed in such naughty little monkeys.” Tim, Sam, and Lulu just gazed at her silently.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-hall

Image copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, text copyright Quentin Blake, 2016. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

The next day Hilda went to the hat store. Before she left she told her little monkeys to be good. But as soon as she was out the door, they hurried to the living room to play. They upended the wastebasket, spilled the flower vase, tore the newspapers, and tangled Hilda’s knitting into knots. “When Hilda came home and went into the living room she found the most awful mess. There were flowers all over the place. And her poor knitting!” She admonished the little monkeys, but they just “looked at her with their big round eyes and said nothing.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-living-room

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Needing more wool, Hilda headed into town the next day with a reminder to her monkeys to be good while she was away. But the kitchen was so enticing, and they tossed everything out of the cupboards, scattered the powdered soap, emptied the trashcan, and tipped the soup pan onto the floor. This time when Hilda got home, she became angry. “‘Great grief! How long can I put up with these terrible little monkeys?’” But Tim, Sam, and Lulu just smiled at her.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-kitchen

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

The next day was market day again and once again the monkeys grew bored as soon as Hilda was gone. The bathroom was a perfect playroom with its toilet paper to unroll, toothpaste tube to squeeze, and shampoo to splash around. Hilda nearly tore her hair out when she returned to this mayhem. As she stared at her monkeys wrapped in toilet paper and sporting sudsy costumes, she cried, “‘Oh, for a peaceful life without these wicked little monkeys!’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-closet

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Before going out the next morning, Hilda gave Tim, Sam, and Lulu a stern talking to. It was late when she returned and as she stepped through the door something seemed amiss. The living room was in perfect order, the kitchen was spotless, and the bathroom shone. Hilda broke down in tears. Something horrible must have happened to her three little monkeys. Her handkerchief was soaked through, and when she went to the closet to get a new one, she found Tim, Sam, and Lulu waiting quietly for her.

Hilda hugged them all and “that night…went up the stairs to bed with a happy heart.” As she got under the covers, she found herself lying on all her forks, spoons, and cans of sardines. “But that is the kind of thing you have to expect if you have three little monkeys.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-coming-home

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Quentin Blake’s hilarious tale of three little monkeys has all the charm and style of classic storytelling that will set young readers giggling and eagerly anticipating each of Hilda’s trips into town. Adults with “little monkeys” of their own will anticipate the tenderhearted ending, and children will be delighted with the assurance of enduring love Hilda’s tears provide. A dramatic reading of Hilda’s increasing frustration with her mischievous charges will enthrall listeners as they gaze at the reader with the same sweet expression as Tim, Sam, and Lulu.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-gazing

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Emma Chichester Clark’s sophisticated illustrations begin on the endpapers, where Hilda is leaving her elegant brownstone under the watchful gaze of her little monkeys. Tim, Sam, and Lulu are as cute as can be as they happily eat their snack and give a hint of the shenanigans to come. With each new day, the monkeys get into more and more trouble, leading to wonderful, fully detailed two-page masterpieces of the mayhem they cause. Hilda’s growing consternation is clear in her facial expressions and gestures. Kids will love Hilda’s collection of hats and matching outfits and scenes of her home. When Hilda comes home to a pristine house, the brightly colored pages turn as gray as a cloudy day. The sunny hues return with the discovery of her precious little ones, and the bedtime surprise is a delight.

Ages 4 – 8

HarperCollins, 2017 | ISBN 978-0062670670

Discover more about Quentin Blake, his books, and his illustration work on his website

To learn more about Emma Chichester Clark, her books, and her paintings, visit her website.

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monkey-bookmark

Just Hanging Around! Bookmark

 

Monkeys love hanging around! Print this Just Hanging Around! Bookmark, color it and then let this little one save your page until you come back to reading! 

Picture Book Review

April 1 – Reading is Funny Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-cover

About the Holiday

On April 1 there’s a lot of funny stuff going on, so why shouldn’t reading be funny too? With so many books that can make you laugh out loud and see the world in a new, positive, or even quirky way, there’s no time like the present to get reading! To celebrate today, buy a new funny book at your local bookstore or check some out from your library. Parents and grandparents may enjoy sharing the funny books that were their favorites too! 

I Have a Balloon

Written by Ariel Bernstein | Illustrated by Scott Magoon

 

An owl warily hangs onto his balloon as a monkey swings into the picture pointing at the owl’s prized possession. “I have a balloon,” the owl states. “That is a big balloon,” says the monkey. The owl proudly concurs as he repeats the monkey’s praise. But the monkey is not finished with his compliments. “That is a shiny red balloon,” he says. Yes, the owl agrees.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-monkey-meets-owl

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Perhaps, though, the monkey’s compliments are not entirely gratuitous. He adds that the shiny, red balloon would look swell with his shiny, red bowtie and imagines walking into school with such a perfectly matched outfit. In fact, he says, “The only thing I’ve ever wanted, since right now, is a shiny, big red balloon.” The monkey’s not without some sense of fairness, though, and offers to trade his teddy bear for the balloon. But the owl isn’t feeling it.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-problem

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

If teddy bears aren’t the owl’s thing, what about a sunflower? The monkey has one of those too, and it’s enormous—even bigger than the balloon! Is the owl interested in trading? No. Would he like “a robot? No.” “A picture of ten balloons? No.” How about a bowling ball and pin? No and No. Finally, the monkey pulls out a sock. Hmmm…the owl seems a bit intrigued. He can see the merits of this sock: it “has a star on it” and “a perfectly shaped hole.” The monkey has to acknowledge these fine qualities.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-shiny-balloon

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Is the owl wavering? The balloon doesn’t do anything—but the sock? There are so many things to do with a sock like that. “You can wear a sock on your tail or your foot or your hand or your ear,” and it makes a perfect puppet. Feeling victory in his grasp, the monkey offers the sock in exchange for the balloon, and the owl agrees. The monkey is surprised. You mean the “sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole?” That’s the one.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-shiny-tie

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

But wait! The monkey now seems to have had a change of heart: “All I’ve ever wanted, since right now, is a sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole. It makes me SO HAPPY!” So, the owl and the monkey seem to be back to square one: “I have a sock. You have a balloon,” the monkey states. “I have a balloon,” the owl concurs. Phew! Well, that’s settled! Or is it…?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-upside-down

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Ariel Bernstein’s quick-witted owl and monkey may not end up trading objects, but they sure trade banter—much to the benefit of little readers. In the dynamic dynamics between the capricious monkey and the astute owl, there is much for children to talk and think about. While the monkey lives in the moment, bouncing from one desire to another, the owl plays a longer game, considering each of his options.

When the monkey hits upon the sock after and the owl accepts, kids may well wonder if the owl is using a little reverse psychology to redirect the monkey away from his balloon or whether he really wants that sock. Children might also think about an object’s value when seen through another’s eyes. In the end, both the monkey and the owl seem happy with their objects, raising another talking point on being satisfied with what you have. Bernstein’s funny, mirrored dialog is a joy to read out loud and also allows for various interpretations in tone that could lead to multiple readings and meanings.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-falls

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Scott Magoon sets the stage and the characters’ personalities on the first page as the adorable, coconut-shaped monkey swings in on a vine much to the wariness of the tolerant, blue owl. Humorous touches will keep kids giggling (the monkey attends Monkey C. Do elementary school) and provide an arc for this clever story. Children will notice that the branch that breaks in the first pages is bandaged together with the very useful sock later on. Magoon deftly handles the change in fortunes with wry looks, imagination bubbles, and plenty of action.  A little foot that appears on the second-to-last spread provides a bit of foreshadowing to the story’s final laugh.

I Have a Balloon is a terrific read aloud and would be a much-asked-for addition to classroom or public libraries and for any child’s home bookshelf.

Ages 4 – 8

Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481472500

You’ll discover more about Ariel Bernstein and her books as well as a Teacher’s Guide on her website!

Check out the gallery of illustration work by Scott Magoon on his website

Reading is Funny Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-love-to-read-bookmarks

Reading Is Funny Bookmarks

 

As you mark your place—or your favorite part—in your books, you’ll get a laugh out of these punny bookmarks!

Reading Is Funny Bookmarks

 

Picture Book Review

February 8 – Laugh and Get Rich Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-cover

About the Holiday

Today isn’t about selling tickets to your stand-up comedy show or laughing all the way to the bank. Instead, today’s holiday celebrates the way laughter can enrich our lives in so many ways. Laughing with friends is one of the best ways to relax, and the health benefits of laughter and having a positive outlook are well-known. Laughter can also help us get through those less-than-perfect situations too—as today’s book shows!

Accident!

By Andrea Tsurumi

 

Lola comes cartwheeling through the living room deftly hopping over her scattered toys and around the letters that spell out A-C-C-I-D-E-N… but there’s a pitcher of juice on the T-able. Could this just be an accident waiting… well, you know! Let’s see…

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-title-page

Copyright Andrea Tsurumi, 2017, courtesy of andreatsurumi.com.

“OOF! OH NO!, Lola cried. I’ve ruined everything!” It does look pretty bad now that the white chair is dripping with juice. Lola knows just how to fix this. She’ll run away to the library and hide. “They have books and bathrooms. And I’ll stay there till I’m a grownup,” she says. She’s running pell-mell for the library when she hears, “OH NO!” She runs over to the playground to see what the matter is and finds that her friend has broken the chains on her swing. “What…do…I…do?!” she asks. Lola knows….

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-sheep

Copyright Andrea Tsurumi, 2017, courtesy of andreatsurumi.com.

They’re both tearing off for the library when they see Sheep in the midst of a “MAJOR MESS!” Seems he snipped the hose while trimming the bushes, and now the hose is dancing all over the place and water is squirting everywhere. “I…AM…THE…WORST!” Sheep cries. Lola and Bear know how he feels. They can’t get to the library fast enough, so they don’t see Aardvark wheeling her grocery cart down the sidewalk. “OOF! ACK! SPLAT!” Sheep goes flying and dives right into Puffer Fish’s freshly baked cake.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-building

Copyright Andrea Tsurumi, 2017, courtesy of andreatsurumi.com.

The four take off through the neighborhood, not looking right or left, wondering what more can happen. In and out, up and down, around and around they run, completely missing the “WHOOPS! OOPS!… SPILLS… MAYHEM”…and “CALAMITY” at every turn. At last they make it to the library where all is calm until…”CATASTROPHE” hits. Lola bounces and rolls out of the way of flying books and right into Birdy, who has a little secret. When Lola tells her about all the DISASTERS, FIASCOS, and CATASTROPHES, Birdy has just one word for her: “Accident.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-fiasco

Copyright Andrea Tsurumi, 2017, courtesy of andreatsurumi.com.

Everyone stops to listen and hear how they can make it right. So Lion apologizes to Rabbit, the Rhinos upright Turtle’s car, Lola helps Walrus squeeze out of the tire around his middle, and all over town, friends and strangers help each other clean up the messes. Lola grabs cleaning supplies and races home to find her dad has had an accident of his own. But a little picking up and a little pick-me-up sets the world right again.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-we're-so-lucky

Copyright Andrea Tsurumi, 2017, courtesy of andreatsurumi.com.

For kids—and adults—who tend to take an apocalyptic view of mistakes, Andrea Tsurumi’s hilarious cartoon-inspired compendium of “catastrophes” is the perfect antidote. Her sparse text of shocked cries delivered in speech bubbles and all-caps typeface are laugh-out-loud funny and lead readers to linger over the pages to catch one mishap after the next. Tsurumi’s bright illustrations offer the best of slap-stick comedy brought to the page and are a riot of slips, spills, surprised faces, and silly antics.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-accident!-end-of-world

Copyright Andrea Tsurumi, 2017, courtesy of andreatsurumi.com.

An anteater’s long tongue spells out “Yikes,” a bull leaves a china shop clutching broken shards of dishware, a narwhal nanny inadvertently pops her young charge’s balloon, and a bear thoughtlessly serves a soft-boiled egg to a chicken. Kids will have a blast finding their favorite mishap, spying the accidents waiting to happen, and following the domino-like sequences. They’ll also see that everyone makes mistakes and that, when taken with a pinch of humor, they can be easily remedied. 

Accident! would make a terrific gift and an often-asked-for addition to home, classroom, school, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2017 | ISBN 978-0544944800

You’ll find an Accident! Activity Guide to download for fun and educational story times on the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt website.

Discover more about Andrea Tsurumi, her books, and her art as well as Accident! activity sheets on her website.

Laugh and Get Rich Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-made-you-laugh-word-search

Made You Laugh! Word Search

 

People love to laugh, giggle, chuckle—or however you like to say it! Find all twenty-five synonyms for laugh or funny in this printable Made You Laugh! Word Search Puzzle!

Made You Laugh! Word Search PuzzleMade You Laugh! Word Search Puzzle Solution

Picture Book Review

October 4 – Balloons Around the World Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-cover

About the Holiday

You know you love balloons! Just watching them flutter from mailboxes, bob in the air while tied to a toddler’s wrist, or even float up, up, and away into a blue sky can make you smile. Today’s holiday was established in 2000 by Jeff Brown, who thought these useful and playful favorites deserved a little recognition. Balloons first burst onto the scene in 1783 when Jacques Charles took the first flight in a hydrogen balloon. In 1824 Michael Faraday invented the rubber balloon, and the importance of this discovery cannot be overblown…or…well…you know what happens. To celebrate today’s holiday, why not visit your local party store or grocery store and pick one of the amazing specialty balloons on display—or if you’re a purist, put together a bouquet of colorful traditional balloons.

I Have a Balloon

Written by Ariel Bernstein | Illustrated by Scott Magoon

 

An owl warily hangs onto his balloon as a monkey swings into the picture pointing at the owl’s prized possession. “I have a balloon,” the owl states. “That is a big balloon,” says the monkey. The owl proudly concurs as he repeats the monkey’s praise. But the monkey is not finished with his compliments. “That is a shiny red balloon,” he says. Yes, the owl agrees.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-monkey-meets-owl

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Perhaps, though, the monkey’s compliments are not entirely gratuitous. He adds that the shiny, red balloon would look swell with his shiny, red bowtie and imagines walking into school with such a perfectly matched outfit. In fact, he says, “The only thing I’ve ever wanted, since right now, is a shiny, big red balloon.” The monkey’s not without some sense of fairness, though, and offers to trade his teddy bear for the balloon. But the owl isn’t feeling it.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-problem

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

If teddy bears aren’t the owl’s thing, what about a sunflower? The monkey has one of those too, and it’s enormous—even bigger than the balloon! Is the owl interested in trading? No. Would he like “a robot? No.” “A picture of ten balloons? No.” How about a bowling ball and pin? No and No. Finally, the monkey pulls out a sock. Hmmm…the owl seems a bit intrigued. He can see the merits of this sock: it “has a star on it” and “a perfectly shaped hole.” The monkey has to acknowledge these fine qualities.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-shiny-balloon

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Is the owl wavering? The balloon doesn’t do anything—but the sock? There are so many things to do with a sock like that. “You can wear a sock on your tail or your foot or your hand or your ear,” and it makes a perfect puppet. Feeling victory in his grasp, the monkey offers the sock in exchange for the balloon, and the owl agrees. The monkey is surprised. You mean the “sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole?” That’s the one. 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-shiny-tie

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

But wait! The monkey now seems to have had a change of heart: “All I’ve ever wanted, since right now, is a sock with a star and a perfectly shaped hole. It makes me SO HAPPY!” So, the owl and the monkey seem to be back to square one: “I have a sock. You have a balloon,” the monkey states. “I have a balloon,” the owl concurs. Phew! Well, that’s settled! Or is it…?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-upside-down

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Ariel Bernstein’s quick-witted owl and monkey may not end up trading objects, but they sure trade banter—much to the benefit of little readers. In the dynamic dynamics between the capricious monkey and the astute owl, there is much for children to talk and think about. While the monkey lives in the moment, bouncing from one desire to another, the owl plays a longer game, considering each of his options.

When the monkey hits upon the sock after and the owl accepts, kids may well wonder if the owl is using a little reverse psychology to redirect the monkey away from his balloon or whether he really wants that sock. Children might also think about an object’s value when seen through another’s eyes. In the end, both the monkey and the owl seem happy with their objects, raising another talking point on being satisfied with what you have. Bernstein’s funny, mirrored dialog is a joy to read out loud and also allows for various interpretations in tone that could lead to multiple readings and meanings.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-have-a-balloon-falls

Image copyright Scott Magoon, 2017, text copyright Ariel Bernstein, 2017. Courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Scott Magoon sets the stage and the characters’ personalities on the first page as the adorable, coconut-shaped monkey swings in on a vine much to the wariness of the tolerant, blue owl. Humorous touches will keep kids giggling (the monkey attends Monkey C. Do elementary school) and provide an arc for this clever story. Children will notice that the branch that breaks in the first pages is bandaged together with the very useful sock later on. Magoon deftly handles the change in fortunes with wry looks, imagination bubbles, and plenty of action.  A little foot that appears on the second-to-last spread provides a bit of foreshadowing to the story’s final laugh.

I Have a Balloon is a terrific read aloud and would be a much-asked-for addition to classroom or public libraries and for any child’s home bookshelf.

Ages 4 – 8

Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481472500

You’ll discover more about Ariel Bernstein and her books as well as a Teacher’s Guide on her website!

Check out the gallery of illustration work by Scott Magoon on his website

Balloons Around the World Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-balloons-clipart

Volleyballoon

 

This mashup of two favorite activities—volleyball and balloon batting—makes a fun, safe indoor game for parties or playtime. All you need is a balloon, a strip of masking or duct tape and a few enthusiastic players.

Set Up

  • Find a large open space to play in
  • Divide the area in half with a strip of tape. This is the “net”
  • Blow up and tie a traditional balloon
  • Teams can consist of any number of players

Playing the Game

  • The object of the game is to keep the balloon in the air while tapping it back and forth over the tape “net” designated on the floor.
  • If the balloon hits the floor, the other team earns a point
  • The first team to reach 10 points is the winner. The number of points needed to win can be adjusted depending on the age of the players and the time available to play

Picture Book Review