January 29 – Curmudgeon’s Day

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About the Holiday

You know how gray days (literal and metaphorical) make you feel—grumpy, irritable, standoffish. Today is a day when it’s ok to indulge—and maybe even celebrate—those feelings. Remember, grouchiness can lead to change, so take control and do what you can to alleviate the situation. Whether you choose to stay home today and do nothing or get out there and make the best of it, have a happy Curmudgeon’s Day!

Grumpy Monkey

Written by Suzanne Lang | Illustrated by Max Lang

 

Jim Panzee woke up feeling pretty rotten. “The sun was too bright, the sky was too blue, and the bananas were too sweet.” Jim didn’t know why he was feeling this way. Norman the gorilla, Jim’s next-door neighbor, suggested that he might be grumpy. But Jim insisted that that wasn’t the problem. As the two walked along, they met Marabou, a long-legged bird. Norman explained that Jim was grumpy, but Jim denied it. Marabou pointed out that even Jim’s hunched posture showed his grumpiness. Jim wiggled his arms and shook his legs to prove how un-grumpy he was.

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Image copyright Max Lang, 2018, text copyright Suzanne Lang, 2018. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Next, they met Lemur, and Norman told him all about Jim’s grumpiness. Lemur couldn’t understand it, especially since it was “‘such a wonderful day.’” “‘Grumpy! Me? I’m not grumpy,’ said Jim.” Lemur said Jim’s grumpiness was obvious from the way he furrowed his eyebrows, so Jim raised them. They continued walking until Jim “tripped over Snake.” Norman gasped; this would only make Jim grumpier, he thought. Jim reminded Norman that he wasn’t grumpy in the first place. Snake wanted to know then, if that was true, why Jim was frowning. Jim obliged and put on a big smile.

Now Jim looked happy, but he still wasn’t happy. Everyone, it seemed, “wanted Jim to enjoy this wonderful day.” The birds wanted him to sing along with them, but Jim just scowled. The other monkeys wanted Jim to swing with them, but he just swatted their welcoming hands away. The zebras invited him to roll in the dust with them, and the peacocks wanted him to stroll along with them, but Jim didn’t feel like doing these things either.

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Image copyright Max Lang, 2018, text copyright Suzanne Lang, 2018. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Everyone had an idea on how to make Jim less grumpy, but Jim simply hunkered down and exploded: “‘I’M NOT GRUMPY!’ And he stormed off.” Jim felt bad for shouting at everyone, but he felt even worse for himself. He decided that maybe he was grumpy and he began to feel really sad. Just then, though, he saw Norman. “Norman was slumped. His eyebrows were bunched up, and he was frowning.” Jim asked him if he was grumpy.

It wasn’t that, Norman replied. He was sore from getting quills stuck in his behind while dancing with Porcupine. Jim asked him if he was okay, and Norman said, “‘It hurts but I’ll probably feel better soon enough.’” Then Norman asked Jim if he was still feeling grumpy. Norman admitted he was, but said, “‘I’ll probably feel better soon enough, too. For now, I need to be grumpy.’” The two friends agreed that it was a good day to be grumpy, which made them feel a little better already.

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Image copyright Max Lang, 2018, text copyright Suzanne Lang, 2018. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Suzanne Lang’s funny story belies an important truth about feelings for kids and adults: sometimes you just feel grumpy, and the best way to assuage it is to acknowledge the feeling, stew a bit, and let happiness return. Well-meaning Norman is a true friend who, after trying to cheer Jim up and suffering his own grumpiness-inducing mishap, comes to understand that like physical pain, sadness takes time to heal too. Readers will laugh at Jim’s attempts to embrace his friends’ suggestions while understanding that these surface “fixes” don’t get to the root of what’s bothering Jim. Children will also giggle at Norman’s sticky situation but show him plenty of empathy too. The pair’s final camaraderie is heartwarming.

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Image copyright Max Lang, 2018, text copyright Suzanne Lang, 2018. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Max Lang’s lush illustrations overflow with style and humor that kids will love. Little Jim with his surly glower tries to make his friends happy, but readers will recognize his half-hearted attempts—from wiggling his arms to raising his eyebrows to forcing a smile—as things they’ve probably done themselves. As more and more of Jim’s friends get in on the act, their cartoony expressions will make kids laugh. When Jim just can’t take it anymore and beats his chest while shouting, both children and adults will have a chuckle over how spot-on this portrayal is. The quiet companionship between Norman and Jim that follows is a welcome image of acceptance.

A book that offers a humorous way for kids and adults to talk about not only sadness but other emotions that can sometimes overwhelm, Grumpy Monkey is an excellent choice for home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 3 – 7

Random House Books for Young Readers, 2018 | ISBN 978-0553537864

To learn more about Max Lang, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Curmudgeon’s Day Activity

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How Do You Feel? Emotions Storytelling Bear

 

With this Emotions Storytelling Bear, you and your child can talk about different emotions and feelings while changing the expressions on the bear’s face. Use the templates and/or make your own facial features. You can also use the bear to make up stories or play a game.

Supplies

  • Printable Bear Head Template
  • Printable Eyes and Noses Template
  • Printable Eyebrows  and Ears Template
  • Light brown felt or fleece (or color of your choice), 8 ½ x 11 inch piece
  • Dark brown felt or fleece(or color of your choice), 8 ½ x 11 inch piece
  • White felt or fleece, 8 ½ x 11 inch piece
  • Black felt or fleece, for pupils
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • 1 playing die (optional)

Directions

  1. Print templates
  2. Cut bear head from light felt or fleece
  3. Cut eyes from white felt or fleece
  4. Cut nose and inner ears from dark brown felt or fleece
  5. Cut pupils from black felt or fleece
  6. Glue pupils onto white eyes

Alternatively: Color and play with the paper set

For a Fun Story Time

Give the bear different faces and make up stories of why he looks that way!

To Play a Game

Roll the die to collect parts of the bear’s face. The first player to collect all of the bear’s facial features is the winner.

  • Die dots correspond to:
  • 1—one eyebrow
  • 2—second eyebrow
  • 3—one eye
  • 4—second eye
  • 5—nose
  • 6—inner ears

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You can find Grumpy Monkey at these book sellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

January 26 – National Seed Swap Day

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About the Holiday

If you love to garden, you may want to get involved with National Seed Swap Day! The first Seed Swap Day was held in Washington DC in 2006. Since then it has grown to be a nation-wide event as gardeners get together to trade the seeds from their best plants. Not only does this improve the biodiversity in your local area, it’s a great way to make new friends! To learn more about what events are planned in your area, visit the official National Seed Swap blog.

The Bad Seed

Written by Jory John | Illustrated by Pete Oswald

 

A sunflower seed stares straight off the page and admits it: “I’m a bad seed. A baaaaaaaad seed.” He knows that all the other seeds would agree. They point him out and mumble, “There goes a baaaad seed.” You might wonder just how bad a seed he can be. Well…pretty bad. In fact, he’ll tell you himself. Are you ready? Take a listen: “I never put things back where they belong. I’m late to everything. I tell long jokes with no punchlines.”

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Image copyright Pete Oswald, 2017, text copyright Jory John, 2017. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

Heard enough? Still think this seed may not be so bad? Well, what if you knew he was unhygienic, a little untruthful, and sometimes a lot inconsiderate. Why does he do this stuff? You know why: he’s “a bad seed. A baaaad seed.” You might ponder if he was always this way. The answer’s No. In fact, he “was born a humble seed on a simple sunflower in an unremarkable field.”

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Image copyright Pete Oswald, 2017, text copyright Jory John, 2017. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

He just hung out with his big family of seeds until the flower began to droop, the seeds scattered, and then…he found himself in a bag. In a terrifying moment, he was almost eaten by a giant with a big, scary mouth, but he was “spit out at the last possible second.” He landed under some bleachers, and when he woke up he found his life changed forever. He had “become a different seed entirely.” He’d “become a bad seed.”

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Image copyright Pete Oswald, 2017, text copyright Jory John, 2017. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

He was in unknown territory, and all by himself. He’s happy to share the sad details: “I stopped smiling. I kept to myself. I drifted. I was friend to nobody and bad to everybody. I was lost on purpose. I lived inside a soda can. I didn’t care. And it suited me.” That is it did suit him until recently. This seed did some soul searching, and decided to be better.

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Image copyright Pete Oswald, 2017, text copyright Jory John, 2017. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

So now he still does some of that bad stuff (did you hear someone talking during a movie? That was probably him), but he does some good stuff too—like having good manners and smiling at people. Now, he says, “even though I still feel bad, sometimes, I also feel kind of good. It’s sort of a mix.” He’s just going to keep trying, and thinking, and readjusting his behavior and view of himself. Now when he’s walking down the street, he still hears, “There goes that bad seed.” But he also hears, “Actually, he’s not all that bad anymore.”

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Image copyright Pete Oswald, 2017, text copyright Jory John, 2017. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

Jory John’s sly look at bad behavior is a sophisticated psychological thriller for the youngest set. With a light touch, John explores some of the events that can cause sadness, loneliness, and even personality changes. As the once-happy seed loses his home, scatters from family, and ends up a bit bruised and battered, he sees his once sunny life turn dark.

With a hardened heart, he goes about his days, acting badly and letting the comments of others define him. To his credit, however, this seed has the presence of mind—and enough honesty—to recognize his bad behavior and also to know that only he can change it. The niceties that the seed foregoes will have kids and adults laughing out loud as his reputation seems more roguish than the reality. And the authentic ending holds a reassuring kernel of truth—life is a bit of a mix, but happiness often wins out.

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Image copyright Pete Oswald, 2017, text copyright Jory John, 2017. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

Looking at Pete Oswald’s adorable illustrations, it’s understandable if you don’t quite believe the sunflower seed when he says he’s a baaaad seed. Sure, he scowls and furrows his brow, butts in line, and gets a bit stinky, but underneath that hard shell, lies the heart of a softie. The other seeds in the neighborhood—pistachios, peanuts, almonds, chestnuts, cashews, and more—are fed up with him, though, registering fear, dismay, and even anger over the sunflower’s behavior. When the sunflower seed has a change of heart, however, others take note, and he gets another crack at life.

The Bad Seed is a funny book that kids will love to hear again and again. It also provides many teachable moments for those times when life gets a little discouraging. If you’re looking for an original book that has a bit of everything to add to a home, classroom, or public library, The Bad Seed is a good—no, great—choice.

Ages 4 – 8

HarperCollins, 2017 | ISBN 978-0062467768

Discover more about Jory John and his books on his website

Learn more about Pete Oswalk and view a portfolio of his artwork on his tumblr.

How good is this The Bad Seed book trailer? Take a look!

National Seed Swap Day Activity

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Seed Packet Coloring Pages

 

All of your favorite veggies come from seeds, of course!, and those seeds come in packets that are little bits of art. Grab your crayons or pencils and color these printable Seed Packet Coloring Pages.

Carrots Seed Packet | Peas Seed Packet | Broccoli Seed Packet | Corn Seed Packet

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You can find The Bad Seed at these booksellers:

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

January 23 – National Reading Day

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About the Holiday

Celebrated in schools across the country, National Reading Day was established to encourage students in PreK through 3rd grade to develop a love of reading, which is the basis for becoming a lifelong learner. Schools, libraries, organizations, bookstores, and parents provide activities to connect young readers with books they’ll love.

Sterling Children’s Books sent me a copy of Mirabel’s Missing Valentines to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be partnering with Sterling in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Mirabel’s Missing Valentines

Written by Janet Lawler | Illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller

 

Mirabel had always been very shy, and as Valentine’s Day approached she was nervous about giving cards away at school. Still, “despite her nerves, the night before, she crafted works of art.” When she was finished, she signed them and drew a heart. In the morning, though, she was reluctant to go to school. Finally, though she left the house and ran to school. In her hurry, she didn’t notice that her bag was getting lighter and lighter.

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Image copyright Olivia Chin Mueller, 2018, text copyright Janet Lawler, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Mirabel rushed past a lonely lady who was checking her mailbox—and then checking it again just in case. But as Mirabel hurried down the road, the lady turned and saw a valentine lying next to her. “She smiled and thought, How nice!” As she turned a corner, “construction workers sweating / as they dug around a pole / laughed to find a sweet surprise / half-buried in the hole.”

A baby found a valentine that had floated into their stroller, and for a jogger who’d just stepped in gun, the sparkly card on the ground made her day better. Others, too, found valentines that made them smile. Suddenly, though, the neighbors all heard a cry: “‘I’ve lost my valentines!’” Mirabel had discovered a hole in her bag and that all of her cards were gone. Everyone realized what had happened. They rushed to find Mirabel and return the valentines. “‘Your cards have made us smile! / Thanks for sharing them with us, / if only for a while,’” they told her.

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Image copyright Olivia Chin Mueller, 2018, text copyright Janet Lawler, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Seeing all of their happy faces cheered Mirabel and made her feel braver. She waved goodbye to her new friends and followed the other students into school. Later, she joined in her class party and was excited to share the valentines she’d made. On the way home from school, Mirabel didn’t notice the jogger, dad, construction workers, and others slip valentines into her bag as she passed by. But when she got home, she discovered that her bag was overflowing with love.

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Image copyright Olivia Chin Mueller, 2018, text copyright Janet Lawler, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Janet Lawler’s endearing story of a little mouse who is nervous about Valentine’s Day will resonate with little ones and adult readers as well. Sharing one’s feelings and talents—as Mirabel does with her homemade cards—can be daunting, but Lawler shows that friendship shared is often returned in kind. Little ones will find much to admire in Mirabel’s bravery to go to school even though she is apprehensive about what the day will bring. The reminder that children occupy a special place in the heart of many people, including family, friends, teachers, librarians, and others that they interact with, will cheer them and inspire them to reach out and accept the love offered on Valentine’s Day and every other day.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mirabele's-missing-valentines-lonely-lady

Image copyright Olivia Chin Mueller, 2018, text copyright Janet Lawler, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Olivia Chin Mueller’s Mirabel is an adorable friend for little readers. As she cowers under a blanket, contemplating going to school, kids will send her encouraging thoughts and be happy to see her change her mind and hurry along to join her classmates. As the valentines begin to fly out of Mirabel’s bag, readers will wonder who will find each card and will look forward to each page turn. The smiles on the faces of those treated to the surprise gift are heartening as readers see what a positive impact little Mirabel has on those around her. As Mirabel hands out her valentines to her classmates, hearts abound, demonstrating along with the students’ smiles and surprised expressions the warm feelings of friendship that are contained not only in each unique card but in Mirabel’s kind spirit. The final image of Mirabel clasping her bag full of valentines is endearing.

Ages 3 – 7

Sterling Children’s Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1454927396

Discover more about Janet Lawler and her books on her website.

To learn more about Olivia Chin Mueller, her books, and her art on her website.

Mirabel’s Missing Valentines Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Sterling Children’s Books in this giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Mirabel’s Missing Valentines by Janet Lawler | illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller

To be entered to win, just Follow me on Twitter @CelebratePicBks and Retweet a giveaway tweet during this week, January 23 – 29. Already a follower? Thanks! Just Retweet for a chance to win. 

A winner will be chosen on January 30.

Giveaway open to US addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

Prizing provided by Sterling Children’s Books.

National Reading Day Activity

cpb - monster love maze

Monster Love! Maze

 

Help the love monster gobble up all the Valentine’s Day candy snacks in this printable maze!

Monster Love! Maze | Monster Love Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mirabelle's-missing-valentines-cover

You can find Mirabele’s Missing Valentines at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

November 15 – It’s National Gratitude Month

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About the Holiday

There are many things to be thankful for this month and all throughout the year. At the top of the list would be our friends—both old and new. Celebrate your friendships during the holidays and tell them how important they are in your life!

Two Lions sent me a copy of King Ben and Sir Rhino to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m also excited to be partnering with Two Lions in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

King Ben and Sir Rhino

By Eric Sailer

 

Ben was the king of his jungle—his room, his toys, and his servants called Mom and Dad. “Indeed, Ben had everything except a loyal subject.” When he demanded that the elephant, zebra, and monkey kids play with him, they just laughed and ran off. Then he met a rhinoceros!” The rhinoceros was happy to have someone to play with too as with a stick Ben knighted him “Sir Rhino.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-king-ben-and-sir-rhino-meets-king

Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

“Then fun was proclaimed.” First, Sir Rhino pushed Ben in the wagon, next up were games. The rhino became Ben’s soccer goal and ladder for him to reach the basketball net. At snack time Ben directed Sir Rhino to climb up on a stack of books piled on a chair to reach the cookies. Ben then doled them out—two for Sir Rhino and the rest for him.

After that Ben “decreed mayhem.” During a moment of rest, Ben noticed Sir Rhino playing with his own stuffed rhino toy. “Mine!” he demanded, swiping it from the rhino’s hands. “After all, a king can have what he wants.” But Sir Rhino had had enough. With tears in his eyes, he chased Ben around the room to recover his toy.

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Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Finally, he caught one of the little toy’s arm and tugged while Ben pulled on the other side. Suddenly, with a “RIP!” the rhino was holding only an arm. He ran from the room crying while Ben looked on confused. Ben looked around his empty court. He “missed his loyal subject…his favorite subject.” Then he knew what he had to do.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-king-ben-and-sir-rhino-meets-rhino

Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Ben repaired Sir Rhino’s toy and set out to find him. He looked in treetops, under giraffe, down gopher holes, and even in the river. He finally found rhino alone on the swings. With an apologetic expression he held out Sir Rhino’s toy. “Will you still you still play with me?” Rhino embraced his toy…and Ben, and “a joyous celebration followed.” The next day they played together and Ben let Rhino play with his toys. “Now Ben knows that to be a great king of the jungle…he must be a great friend.” Now Ben even shares his crown!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-king-ben-and-sir-rhino-playing

Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Author Eric Sailer’s debut picture book takes on the sometimes-tricky relationship between two new friends and shows little ones that sharing and consideration for others is what real friendship is all about. Sailer’s narrative text, incorporating called-out words such as proclaimed, declared, and decreed as well as words of royalty, sets the tone of Ben’s interactions with his parents and others while his dynamic illustrations show the effects of Ben’s entitled attitude on Rhino. Rhino’s initial excitement in making a friend turns to bewilderment, disappointment, and tears as Ben orders him around instead of treating him fairly. When Rhino leaves, Ben finally comes to the realization that his actions have consequences. He seeks out Rhino, apologizes, and discovers that sharing the limelight, his toys, snacks, and other things brings joy and true friendship.

For kids navigating the various paths of friendship, King Ben and Sir Rhino offers ways for adults to talk with their children about behavior and their relationships with classmates, siblings, and others.

Ages 4 – 7

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503939844

Discover more about Eric Sailer and his work on his website.

King Ben and Sir Rhino Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Two Lions Publishing in this giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of King Ben and Sir Rhino by Eric Sailer

To be entered to win, just Follow me on Twitter @CelebratePicBks and Retweet a giveaway tweet during this week, November 15 – 21. Already a follower? Thanks! Just  Retweet for a chance to win.

A winner will be chosen on November 22.

Giveaways open to US addresses only. | Prizing provided by Two Lions Publishing.

National Gratitude Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-friends-are-a-maze-ing-winter-maze-puzzle

Friends  Are A-Maze-ing! Maze

 

Three kids would like to help their friends build a snowman. Can you help them reach their friends int his printable Friends Are A-Maze-ing Puzzle?

Friends Are A-Maze-ing Maze | Friends Are A-Maze-ing Solution

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You can find King Ben and Sir Rhino at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

November 12 – It’s World Kindness Week

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About the Holiday

Today begins a week-long awareness of acts of kindness and how gestures of praise and encouragement of others can make life better for all. These days, when negativity seems all pervasive, take some time to look around and really see the goodness that is being done. Take a vow to join in and help make the world a better place for you and especially for your children. Just a smile, a single nice word or a helpful action can make a tremendous difference. To celebrate this week’s holiday, seek out opportunities to say something nice to your family members, friends, coworkers, and those you meet along the way.

Be Kind

Written by Pat Zietlow Miller | Illustrated by Jen Hill

 

At school during snack time when Tanisha spilled grape juice on her new dress, the class burst out laughing. One student remembered that their mom always taught them to be kind and tried to make Tanisha feel better by saying, “Purple is my favorite color.” The student thought Tanisha would smile, but she just ran away. All during art class, Tanisha’s classmate thought about what they should have done instead, wondering, “What does it mean to be kind anyway?”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-be-kind-spilled-juice

Image copyright Jen Hill, 2018, text copyright Pat Zietlow Miller, 2018. Courtesy of us.macmillan.com.

They think, “Maybe it’s giving.” Like baking treats for someone who lives alone, or giving away old clothes to someone who can use them. Helping out might also show kindness. For instance, “putting dirty dishes in the sink” or taking care of a pet. Paying attention to others could be another way to show you care. Like noticing someone’s new shoes, offering to be the new girl’s partner in class, or even just listening to someone’s stories—even if you’ve heard them before. Sometimes being kind is easy, but there are other times when it can be challenging or even scary—“like sticking up for someone when other kids aren’t kind.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-be-kind-in-the-neighborhood

Image copyright Jen Hill, 2018, text copyright Pat Zietlow Miller, 2018. Courtesy of us.macmillan.com.

The child decides that maybe all they can do for Tanisha is to sit near her and paint her a picture of purple and green—of pretty violets. They hope that small acts like these will join with other people’s and that they will expand, fanning out from school into the community, across the country, around the world, and back. “So we can be kind. Again. And again. And again.”

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Image copyright Jen Hill, 2018, text copyright Pat Zietlow Miller, 2018. Courtesy of us.macmillan.com.

Miller’s tender prose is perfect for planting the seeds of kindness and opening discussions about what it means to be caring and compassionate. With more and more children speaking up and creating change, Miller’s gentle and affirming story shows readers that it’s often the little things that count the most. Some of the examples she gives are acts that many children may do already, confirming their innate sensitivity, while others may spark new ideas and expand readers’ definition of kindness.

Jen Hill’s soft-hued illustrations beautifully depict the emotional tug at the heart that Tanisha’s spilled grape juice sets in motion for the protagonist and young readers. As one caring child wonders what kindness really is, Hill clearly portrays diverse children helping out at home, at school, and in their community locally and—as the kindness spreads—around the world. Hill draws the caring student with gender neutral clothing and hair, allowing all children to relate to the story’s main character. 

Be Kind is a lovely perceptive and sensitive book that would be an asset to any home or classroom library.

Ages 3 – 6

Roaring Brook Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-1626723214

Discover more about Pat Zietlow Miller and her books on her website.

To learn more about Jen Hill, her books, and her art, visit her website.

World Kindness Week Activity

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Say Something Nice! Cards

 

Do you want to give someone a nice surprise? Print out these cards and give one to a friend, to someone you’d like to know, or to anyone who looks like they need a pick-me-up! If you’d like to make your own cards, print out the blank template and write and/or draw your own message! You can also print these on adhesive paper and make your own stickers.

Say Something Nice! Cards | Say Something Nice! Cards Blank Template

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You can find Be Kind at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

 

Picture book review

October 17 – It’s National Bullying Prevention Month

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About the Holiday

Every day bullying affects children and adults across this country and worldwide. Overt and subtle, in person and online, bullying destroys happiness, taints school and workplace environments, and sows an atmosphere of distrust and discord. Who can help? Each one of us! National Bullying Prevention Month reminds us that by treating others kindly and with empathy, our world can become a friendlier, more harmonious place. Instituted by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center in 2006, the holiday encourages people to think about how they treat others and provides assistance for schools and others to make positive change. To learn more about what you can do as well as to find classroom toolkits and other resources and information on Unity Day, celebrated on October 24, visit PACER’s website.

Two Lions sent me a copy of What If Everybody Said That? to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m also happy to be partnering with Two Lions in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

What If Everybody Said That?

Written by Ellen Javernick | Illustrated by Colleen Madden

 

At the playground a little girl dressed as a pirate and standing on the prow of her sandbox ship greeted three boys wanting to play with, “‘No boys allowed.’” Their mom overheard her and yelled, “‘What if everybody said that?’” If everybody did say such things would the play tube be off-limits to kids with freckles or the swings forbidden to big kids or the ladder for boys to climb only? That would make some kids pretty mad.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

In art class the girl looked at the other kids’ drawings of dogs. She admits she said: “‘Those don’t look like dogs to me,’ and I laughed.”“‘What if EVERYBODY said that?’” her teacher asked. Then most kids would crumple up their work, throw it away, or even decided they would “never draw again.” At sharing time, this little girl threw a fit because she wanted to be first and talk about her new shoes. What happened? “Our teacher frowned at me and said, ‘What if EVERYBODY said that?’” What an uproar that would cause as all the kids clamored to show their special things.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

When the girl told a boy in her class that his new glasses made him look funny, the principal called her on it. Imagine how the new girl would feel if she saw the texts between two of her classmates, monstagurl15 and badfish8—“Those braces!” “LOL!!! Metal Mouth” “What’s w/the flowers in her hair?” “W.e.i.r.d.o!” “Tohhhtallly.”—when she thought the flowers looked pretty and there’s nothing you can do about braces.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

What if no one in the world would share or send others good wishes? What if everyone scared others for a laugh and quit as soon as things didn’t go their way? What kind of world would it be if no one became friends? Finally, the little girl reflects on her attitude toward others and realizes what her life would be like if she was all alone. She has a change of heart, apologizes to the new girl in the neighborhood that she ignored, and invites her to play.

Now she asks readers to imagine what life would be like if everybody said things like “‘Let’s be friends.” “Welcome to the neighborhood!” Oh! Your cat is sooooo pretty!” The world would be an awesome place if everyone invited others along on life’s journey.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-what-if-everybody-said-that-no-friends

Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Through one girl’s self-described journey to enlightenment, Ellen Javernick powerfully engages readers in thinking about how what they say and do affects others. As the girl relates circumstances in which she snubbed others, put herself first, insulted other kids’ efforts, and was mean in many other ways on the left-hand page while on the right-hand side are several more examples of the results of bullying behavior. Javernick’s examples are realistic and span a wide range of types of bullying from hurtful comments to snarky texts to thinking only of oneself. Each page offers opportunities for discussion, reflection, and learning.

Colleen Madden’s emotion-filled illustrations show  what kind of world we would live in if everybody rejected, ignored, and bullied others. Faces of the children and adults clearly show emotions of smugness, anger, disappointment, and sadness. Sprinkled throughout in thought bubbles and as decorations are emojis that readers will recognize and understand. Madden’s images work hand-in-hand with Javernick’s story to give both kids and adult readers much to think about.

An excellent book to discuss how one person’s words and actions affect others, What If Everybody Said That would be a terrific addition to home, classroom, and library bookshelves.

Ages 3 – 8

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503948952

What If Everybody Said That? Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Two Lions Publishing in this giveaway of

  • One (1) copy of What If Everybody Said That? written by Ellen Javernick | illustrated by Colleen Madden

To be entered to win, just Follow me on Twitter @CelebratePicBks and Retweet a giveaway tweet during this week, October 17 – 23. Already a follower? Thanks! Just  Retweet for a chance to win.

A winner will be chosen on October 24.

Giveaways open to US addresses only. | Prizing provided by Two Lions Publishing.

National Bullying Prevention Month Activity

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Say Something Nice! Cards

 

Do you want to give someone a nice surprise? Print out these cards and give one to a friend, to someone you’d like to know, or to anyone who looks like they need a pick-me-up! If you’d like to make your own cards, print out the blank template and write and/or draw your own message! You can also print these on adhesive paper and make your own stickers.

Say Something Nice! Cards | Say Something Nice! Cards Blank Template

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You can find What If Everybody Said That? at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

October 14 – National Dessert Day

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About the Holiday

Fermented chocolate drinks date back to 1900 BCE and the Aztecs believed cacao seeds were a gift from Quetzalcoatl, their god of wisdom. Who can argue that chocolate is a pretty smart thing? Almost anything is better covered in chocolate, and today’s holiday proves it! Whether you like your chocolate straight up or on the…potato chips, enjoy the day with a little indulgence!

Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake

Written by Michael B. Kaplan | Illustrated by Stéphane Jorisch

 

Betty Bunny knows she’s a “handful” because her parents often tell her so. Betty Bunny also knew her parents love her, so she figures that “being a handful must be very, very good.” One day when her mom offered her a piece of chocolate cake after dinner, Betty Bunny declined. She didn’t like trying new things, and “announced: ‘I hate chocolate cake. Chocolate cake is yucky.” But then added “‘What’s chocolate cake?’”

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Image copyright Stéphane Jorisch, 2016, text copyright, 2016. Michael B. Kaplan. Courtesy of Penguin Books.

With her first bite, Betty Bunny was in love. She was so in love, in fact, that she decided that when she grew up she was “going to marry chocolate cake.” Her siblings were supportive—kind of—but her older brother Bill thought “‘you’re going to have really weird-looking kids.’” The next day at school, Betty Bunny had chocolate on the brain. When her teacher went over the A B C’s Betty said, “‘A is for chocolate cake, B is for chocolate cake, C is for chocolate cake.’”

On the playground when Betty Bunny mixed together dirt and water, it looked like chocolate cake, but sure didn’t taste like it. At dinner Betty Bunny was ready for her dessert before her healthy dinner, but her mom said no; and her dad agreed with her mom. Her siblings tried to help—kind of. Henry suggested she eat some peas. Kate told her to eat her carrots, and Bill taunted, “‘Why don’t you have some chocolate cake? That’s what you really want. Oh, no, wait. You can’t. Ha-Ha.’”

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Image copyright Stéphane Jorisch, 2016, text copyright, 2016. Michael B. Kaplan. Courtesy of Penguin Books.

Betty Bunny exploded. She threw peas at Henry, tossed carrots at Kate, and lobbed mashed potatoes at Bill. Betty Bunny’s mother was not pleased and sent her little daughter to bed without chocolate cake. “Betty Bunny screamed, ‘This family is yucky!’” and stomped up the stairs. Later, her mom came up to kiss her goodnight, and she had a plan. She would put a piece of cake in the fridge and the next day after a good dinner, Betty Bunny could have it. “‘Maybe if you know it’s there waiting for you, it will be easier to be patient,’” her mom said. Betty Bunny thought this was a great idea and “wanted to say something especially nice to her mother. ‘Mommy,’ she said, ‘you are a handful.’”  

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Image copyright Stéphane Jorisch, 2016, text copyright, 2016. Michael B. Kaplan. Courtesy of Penguin Books.

The next morning Betty Bunny couldn’t leave the house without first checking on her piece of cake. It looked so alone sitting on the plate all by itself, so Betty Bunny decided to put it in her pocket and take it to school with her. All day the secret knowledge of what was in her pocket made Betty Bunny happy. At dinner, after she had cleaned her plate, she reached into her pocket for her chocolate cake, but all she found was “a brown, goopy mess” that made her cry.

After her mom explained to her that putting the cake in her pocket was not the same as being patient, she prepared another piece for the next day. In the morning, Betty Bunny remembered her lesson in patience—and that’s why she put the cake…in her sock.

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Image copyright Stéphane Jorisch, 2016, text copyright Michael B. Kaplan, 2016. Courtesy of Penguin Books.

Michael B. Kaplan’s adorable Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake is a delight from its beginning to its smashing ending. He hits all the right notes in this humorous family drama, from the “helpful” siblings to the hair-trigger tantrums to the Ramona Quimby-esque misunderstanding of phrase. Along with the giggle-inducing fun kids learn a bit about patience, and adults discover insight into what goes on in their little bunny’s mind when obsession meets disappointment.

Stéphane Jorisch’s Bunny family is as cute as…well…a bunny.  His watercolor, pen and ink, and gouche paintings employ brilliant color and crisp lines to depict the loving relationship among the siblings and parents as well as the realistic home and school environments. The perfectly drawn body language—including folded arms, sly looks, emotional meltdowns, and understanding smiles—will resonate with kids and adults alike. And once the piece of chocolate cake appears, it’s easy to see how little Betty Bunny could become such a fan.

Ages 3 – 7

Puffin Books, 2016 (paperback) | ISBN 978-1101998632

Chocolate Covered Anything Day

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Delicious Dot-to-Dot

 

Everything is better with chocolate—even this printable Delicious Dot-to-Dot! Get your pencils, follow the dots, and then color this delectable page!

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You can find Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

Picture Book Review