October 26 – Howl at the Moon Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-something-about-sam-cover

About the Holiday

Wolves, with their gleaming eyes, sharp teeth, and eerie resonating howl, evoke strong emotions in many people. Playing the role of both hero and villain in mythological tales, feared by farmers and ranchers, and well known as “big and bad” to children everywhere, wolves are part of our lives whether we’ve ever seen or heard one or not. While many people may have a negative view of wolves, the founders of today’s holiday want to change that. They want people to see the beauty, power, and environmental benefits of these majestic animals. Wolves don’t actually howl at the moon; they howl to communicate with the rest of their pack, but the inspirational nature of an image of the full moon framing the upturned head of a wolf cannot be denied. To celebrate today? Sure! Go out and howl your loudest at the moon!

There’s Something about Sam

Written by Hannah Barnaby | Illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf

 

Max was inviting all the boys in his class to his sleepover birthday party. All except the new kid Sam, that is. “‘There’s something different about him,’” Max told his mom, but she said “‘I’m sure you’ll like him when you get to know him better,’” so Max wrote out the invitation. At school all the boys were excited to go. All except Sam, that is. He wasn’t sure because there was going to be “a full moon that night.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-something-about-sam-invitations

Image copyright Anne Wilsdorf, 2020, text copyright Hanna Barnaby, 2020. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

The other boys thought Sam’s abilities to run really fast and know what the cafeteria would be serving for lunch were awesome. Still, Sam wanted to know what made him seem so different, and he was determined to figure it out at his party. At dinner, Max was mesmerized by Sam’s very rare burger. While they played games, Max thought it was amusing when Sam took a nip at Jeremy, and while all the other boys changed into their pajamas in the family room, Sam did it privately.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-something-about-sam-run-fast

Image copyright Anne Wilsdorf, 2020, text copyright Hanna Barnaby, 2020. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

When Max’s mom brought out cookies, all the boys grabbed for them. That’s when Max noticed Sam’s hairy hands and long, sharp claws. The other kids screamed and hid, but Max thought it was cool. Sam was just about to explain, when “the room was flooded with moonlight.” Sam ran out of the house, growling, with Max right behind him. The boys had wild fun in the backyard all night…until they fell asleep up in a big tree.

As Max and his mom watched the boys head home, Max’s mom had to agree that Sam was “an unusual boy.” “‘Yep,’ Max said, ‘he sure is something.’” Then he ran to his room to schedule monthly sleepovers with Sam.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-something-about-sam-burgers

Image copyright Anne Wilsdorf, 2020, text copyright Hanna Barnaby, 2020. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Hannah Barnaby’s unique tale of friendship and individuality will enchant rambunctious kids for whom the lure of all things wild is irresistible. Quickly paced, Barnaby’s story will entice readers to guess at Sam’s alternate personality and watch eagerly for his transformation. Along the way Barnaby tucks in plenty of traits—from athletic ability to liking the same things to just sharing unstructured play time—that draw friends together and reminds readers to give everyone a chance to show their true selves before making judgements.

Anne Wilsdorf’s delightfully freewheeling boys will charm kids from the first page. When readers first meet Sam, with his scruffy hair, they may begin to get an inkling of just how he is so different. Other hints add to the fun too. Details like monster backpacks, monster-themed toys, pajamas and sleeping bags, and a scary movie on TV leave it up to readers to decide whether Sam is really a werewolf or not.

Simply lots of fun with a welcome message, There’s Something about Sam will be an often-asked for addition to bedtime story times—full moon or not. The book would be  an enchanting addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2020 | ISBN 978-1328766809

Discover more about Hannah Barnaby and her books on her website.

Howl at the Moon Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-werewolf-coloring-page

Werewolf Coloring Page

 

You can have a howling good time with this printable coloring page, and you don’t even need to wait for the full moon!

Werewolf Coloring Page

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-something-about-sam-cover

You can find There’s Something about Sam at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 15 – Triple Treat Halloween Two Lions Book Tour Stop

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-it's-halloween-little-monster-cover

About the Holiday

Today I’m celebrating three books for the Halloween holiday and beyond that are rollicking reads with excitement and heart. These books from favorite authors and illustrators offer distinctly different stories that bring the magic, wonder, and fun of Halloween and lovable ghouls to life. They include a new adventure for a favorite Little Monster, a spooky neighborhood that’s getting a surprising new neighbor, and a construction crew that builds haunted houses at night. 

Thanks go to Blue Slip Media and Two Lions Publishing for sending me the books for review consideration. All opinions on the books are my own. I’m thrilled to be teaming with Blue Slip Media and Two Lions in a giveaway of all three books. See details below.

It’s Halloween, Little Monster

Written by Helen Ketteman | Illustrated by Bonnie Leick

 

It’s Little Monster’s first Halloween and time to for him to put on his costume to go trick-or-treating. He looks out the window with a bit of trepidation at all of the other creatures on his block—a bunny, a bee, a unicorn, a witch, a tiger, and a penguin. Papa puts the finishing touches on Little Monster’s Martian costume and they head outside. Little Monster grabs Papa’s hand and he reassures his little one: “All set to go! / You see things that are scary? / A pirate, a witch, a creature that’s hairy? // Don’t fret, Little Monster. / See there in the street? / That’s not really a ghost— / it’s a kid in a sheet!”

Little Monster and Papa make the rounds of neighbor’s houses as kids howl into the dark night. Papa tells Little Monster there’s nothing to fear, but is there just the tiniest bit of wariness in his own eyes? At one house a witch is “offering cups / of warm, bubbly worm juice!” Papa says, “Yum! Drink it up!” They pass a vampire and get in the middle of a group of “zombies in chains,” but Papa has a plan to fool them and make their escape.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-it's-halloween-little-monster-interior

Image copyright Bonnie Leick, 2020, text copyright Helen Ketteman, 2020. Courtesy of Two Lions.

On one porch four ghosts are floating around, but Little Monster doesn’t seem scared. Papa asks, “No shivers and shakes? / Oh, I see why you’re brave— / spider cupcakes!” Trick-or-treat is almost done, but there’s one final house—the scariest one of all. Papa points out: “The yard’s full of graves. / This could be tough. / Shall we trick-or-treat here? / Will you be brave enough?” But Papa’s gung-ho and he marches right through the graveyard where fanged creatures lurk. Then “Boooooooooo!!!” a skeleton jumps with a shout. Who screams? Who laughs? Read and find out!

Helen Ketteman’s third book in the Little Monster series shines with bouncy rhymes that are full of spooky prowling and highlight the excitement of Halloween while reassuring kids that all the frights are just for fun. Little readers will find all of their favorite monsters here enjoying treats and only a few tricks, which will bring giggles instead of shivers. Ketteman’s perfect rhythm creates a story that’s perfect for dramatic read alouds, and the sweet relationship between Little Monster and Papa will have kids asking to hear the story again and again.

Kids will love spending Halloween with Little Monster and Bonnie Leick’s enchanting, not-too-scary illustrations where—among the witches, vampires, and ghosts—bunnies, chickens, fairies, and other cute-as-a-button characters trick-or-treat under a full moon. Little Monster’s street and the neighbor’s houses are cleverly decorated for the holiday, and readers will want to linger over each page to see all the fun. The spooky graveyard, especially, invites a careful look, as the inscriptions on the stones show that those who lie beneath were more monstrously kind than monstrous.

A sure hit for fans of Little Monster and any child looking forward to their first Halloween or who already know what this holiday is all about, it’s Halloween, Little Monster would be a lively addition to home and public library collections.

Discover more about Helen Ketteman and her books on her website.

To learn more about Bonnie Leick, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Ages 3 – 7

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542092081

You can find It’s Halloween Little Monster at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble |Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from 

Bookshop | IndieBound

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-that-monster-on-the-block-cover

That Monster on the Block

Written by Sue Ganz-Schmitt | Illustrated by Luke Flowers

 

Someone was finally moving into Vampire’s old house. Monster, who lived next door wondered who it might be. He hoped it might be an ogre who would invite him “to swim in his mucky, murky swamp.” Or maybe it would be a “greedy goblin with piles of gold to jump into.” Perhaps it would be a dastardly dragon who would throw greasy barbecues. As Monster practiced how he would say hello to his new neighbor, he watched the movers carrying a trampoline, a unicycle, and lots of trunks.

At last his new neighbor emerged. He was wearing “big floppy shoes” and had “wild orange hair” and “a round, red nose. It was…a clown?” Monster couldn’t believe it. He immediately called the neighbors. “‘Unnnnnhhh, unnnnnhhh, unnnnnhhh,’” said Zombie when he heard the news. Mummy shrieked, and Yeti roared. They all agreed that the neighborhood would never be the same again. None of the neighbors welcomed Clown to their block, so he went around to each house to introduce himself. But no one answered the door. Clown left notes and surprises at each house and went back home. When monster found his gift gummy worms, he threw them in the trash. Clown, meanwhile, sat on his porch “and waited. And waited and sat. No one came around.”

But Clown was naturally happy, so he perked up his dreary house, played a happy tune,  and erected a tent. “Monster called a neighborhood meeting. ‘This is out of control!’” he shouted. But Zombie was busy delighting some neighbors with the brain cake Clown had left him, and Mummy was having fun scaring up laughs with the mummy in the box she’d gotten. Yeti was enjoying tricking others into smelling her trick flowers and then spritzing them with water.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-that-monster-on-the-block-Interior

Image copyright Luke Flowers, 2020, text copyright Sue Ganz-Schmitt, 2020. Courtesy of Two Lions.

No one was listening to Monster, so he decided to do something about the interloper himself. At midnight, he rattled chains and banged on a garbage can lid. But Clown didn’t hear it. He was out doing good deeds to help his new neighbors. In the morning Monster was awakened by circus music. He immediately picked up the phone, but no one answered his calls. “‘It’s time for me to have a word with that bozo!’” he said. He stomped over, but on the way he couldn’t help but find the music catchy, the smell of popcorn enticing, and Clown’s invitation to cartwheeling class at his circus school at least a little intriguing.

Inside the tent, he discovered all of his friends having doing circus tricks. When he learned that Clown was “zero percent creepy” and lots of fun, he decided to him a chance. He enjoyed the day so much that Monster even invited him to tea on Sunday. As Monster poured out the tea and passed around sludgeberry swirl scones, a moving van rolled up the block. Out popped a…well, you’ll have to welcome them yourself, just like all the other neighbors!

Sue Ganz-Schmitt turns somersaults with the usual tropes involving diversity in her story as it honestly portrays truisms about prejudice and how both injustice on one hand and understanding on the other spreads through a community. While Monster’s reaction to immediately alert the neighbors and hold a meeting seems to get a big response, readers will see that by the time the meeting takes place, most of the neighbors welcome the newcomer and the positive changes he’s brought. Ganz-Schmitt’s well-paced and superb storytelling is loaded with personality, puns, and the perfect light touch that will have readers taking her story and lesson into their hearts.

Luke Flowers does wonders with larger-than-life characters, and his depictions of Monster, Clown, and all the neighbors are pitch-perfect. Flowers sets up his visual delights early with the image of Vampire’s old house, which is gray and foreboding with detailing that subtly turns the stone structure into a bat. Later Clown converts these same details into clown faces that will charm kids. Just as in the circus, Clown makes a surprise entrance, one that little readers will guess at with glee. Snapshots of Monster calling up his neighbors appear to show that Mummy, Zombie, and Yeti are on board with his dismay, but Ganz-Schmitt’s monster-sound reactions are cleverly noncommittal. Add in the neighbors’ obvious delight with the gifts Clown leaves (a full-page jack-in-the-box image will bring shrieks of laughter), and readers will happily be in on the vibe at the meeting-turned-party.

Contrasting illustrations of Monster trying to bully Clown into leaving and Clown helping out around the neighborhood give kids and adults opportunities to talk about important issues that arise at school and in the news. While images of Monster having fun at circus school show his changing attitude toward Clown, when his displeasure seems to rise again with the entry of another unexpected neighbor, readers will see that this time he has a different and more welcoming reaction. (Added note: Make sure to inspect each page carefully for added visual humor.)

A clever story that delivers important messages about preconceptions, discrimination and acceptance with humor and respect for the intelligence and awareness of children, That Monster on the Block is a must for home, school, and public library story times all through the year.

Ages 4 – 8

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542005333

Discover more about Sue Ganz-Schmitt and her books and find That Monster on the Block coloring pages on her website.

To learn more about Luke Flowers, his books, and his art on his website.

Scare up some fun with this book trailer!

You can find That Monster on the Block at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble |Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from 

Bookshop | IndieBound

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-build-a-haunted-house-cover

How to Build a Haunted House

Written by Frank Tupta | Illustrated by Kyle Beckett

 

Ghost town is getting a new family, and they need a house built lickety split. There’s just one catch—the house must be built before the sun comes up. The neighbors are game to get it done. The lot is cleared by “werewolf loggers on the prowl.” First, the foundation must be made, but how will it get done? “Over the hill, / a handy rig! / Frankenstein’s / here to dig.” Cyclops and witches help out to prepare the ground. Once it’s ready, Frankenstein’s bride pours concrete. When the concrete’s hard, the skeleton crew is called in to build the frame. Soon the “frame’s up— / it’s a brand-new house. / They’re almost done, but… / Eek! A mouse! The mouse chases round and round. “Hammer falls, nails splash. Bones crunch, toes smash.” The skeletons are scattered here and there—good thing the mummy doctor is on his way.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-build-a-haunted-house-interior

Image copyright Kyle Beckett, 2020, text copyright Frank Tupta, 2020. Courtesy of Two Lions.

The sun is peeking over the hill, but the house is not quite done. With a lightning strike, the power’s on, and the witches bring their magic spells to bring the house alive just in time for the vampire family to move in. The vampires love their spacious house “‘complete with dungeon!’ / ‘And trapdoors, too!’ / ‘The scariest place!’ / ‘With the spookiest view!’” The monsters are proud of the job they’ve done. Their “big trucks rumble off the site…and sleepy monsters say Good Night.”

Frank Tupta’s energetic story about building a haunted house for a very particular family will have kids in suspense as all their favorite monsters race the sun to construct the house in one night. Clever monster-talent match-ups, puns sprinkled throughout, and a mischievous mouse will have kids laughing as the monsters work together to build the house with all the trappings of a true haunted house.

With a palette of purples, greens, and golds, Kyle Beckett creates a ghost town where enthusiastic monsters get to work clearing and smoothing a graveyard by the light of a very large full moon. Kids will love the monster trucks these eager neighbors use to fell trees, dig the basement, and stir concrete. As Frankenstein digs a hole with the help of an enormous hand, the ground is appropriately filled with arms and legs and a few errant bones. While the mummy can’t put the skeletons back together, the witches chime in with a fiery bubbling brew that saves the night just in the nick of time. With a group hug, the monsters celebrate their success before driving their machines out of Vampire Valley and getting some much-needed sleep.

Kids who love construction, big machinery, and helpful monsters will be charmed by the jaunty rhymes of the exuberant How to Build a Haunted House that’s perfect for Halloween or any gently spooky story time.

Ages 3 – 7

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542005432

Discover more about Frank Tupta and his books on his website.

To learn more about Kyle Beckett, his books, and his art on his website.

You can find How to Build a Haunted House at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble |Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from 

Bookshop | IndieBound

Triple Treat Halloween Books Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Two Lions and Blue Slip Media in a giveaway of

  • One (1) copy of It’s Halloween, Little Monster, written by Sue Helen Kelleman | illustrated by Bonnie Leick
  • One (1) copy of That Monster on the Block, written by Sue Ganz-Schmitt | illustrated by Luke Flowers
  • One (1) copy of How to Build a Haunted House, written by Frank Tupta | illustrated by Kyle Beckett

To enter:

  • Follow Celebrate Picture Books
  • Retweet a giveaway tweet
  • Bonus: Reply with your favorite monster for extra entry. Each reply earns you one extra entry

This giveaway is open from October 16 to October 23 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on October 24. 

Prizing provided by Two Lions and Blue Slip Media

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

Triple Treat Halloween Book Tour Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-vampire-treat-box

Vampire Goodie Box

 

Would you like your gift of homemade or store-bought cookies, candy, or other treats to have a little bite to it? Deliver them in this vampire box you can make yourself!

Supplies

  • Recycled pasta box (or any box with a cellophane window in it)
  • Black Paint
  • Silver Paint
  • Black felt, 8 ½ x 11 sheet or heavy stock paper
  • Red felt, 8 ½ x 11 sheet or heavy stock paper
  • Googly eyes
  • Black paper, heavy stock or construction paper
  • Fabric glue
  • Regular glue or double stick tape
  • Hot glue gun (optional)
  • Paint brush
  • Scissors

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-vampire-treat-box-side-view (2)

Directions

  1. Paint the entire box silver, leaving the window unpainted, let dry
  2. With the black paint create the pointy hairstyle, with the point descending about 1 inch from the top of the box and the curves ending about 1 ½ – 1 ¾ inches from the side of the box (see picture).
  3. Paint around the sides and back of the box in line with the ends of the curves
  4. From the black paper make eyebrows—these can be pointy or rounded
  5. From the index card make the nose and teeth
  6. I painted the nose darker silver by combining silver and a little black paint
  7. With the glue or double stick tape, attach the eyebrows and nose to the box
  8. With the glue or double stick tape, attach the teeth to the window, fitting them slightly up into the rim of the window.
  9. Attach the googly eyes

To make the cape

  1. Holding the black felt or paper horizontally, cut a piece about 4/5 as tall as the box
  2. Holding the red felt or paper horizontally, cut a piece of red felt so that there will be a ½-inch border of black along the top and sides
  3. With the fabric glue attach the red felt to the black felt. Use craft glue on paper. Let dry
  4. With the hot glue gun, fabric glue, craft glue, or double stick tape, attach the felt or paper to the back of the box
  5. Fold the felt or paper around the sides of the box and attach along the bottom edge with tape or glue
  6. Fold the top of the felt or paper back to make the collar
  7. Attach the bottom portion of the collar to the box near the front edge with the tape or glue.

Fill with your favorite treat!

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | Prizing provided by Two Lions

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-it's-halloween-little-monster-cover

Picture Book Review

July 13 – Go West Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-cover

About the Holiday

On this date in 1865, Horace Greeley, a writer and editor of the New-York Daily Tribune, is purported to have stated, “Go West, young man, go West and grow up with the country.” He was, supposedly, reacting to the adverse living conditions he found in his own city and echoing the sentiments of many, who did pack up their family and all of their possessions and begin the long, arduous trek across the country to find a better life. Those intrepid souls expanded our nation, and the idea to “go west” is now synonymous with a certain determination, bravery, and sense of adventure.

Thank you to Bloomsbury Children’s Books for sharing Southwest Sunrise with me for review consideration. All opinions of the book are my own. 

Southwest Sunrise

Written by Nikki Grimes | Illustrated by Wendell Minor

 

Jayden mopes all the way from New York to New Mexico, upset about moving from his beloved city to “a place of shadows.” Shadows and drabness are all he sees when he gets off the plane. In the morning, though, he wakes up “to a knife of sunlight slicing through” his room. Here, his window doesn’t have bars, and the view is of a “mountain striped in rainbow.” Jayden is surprised; he didn’t know that was there.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-moving

Image copyright Wendell Minor, 2020, text copyright Nikki Grimes, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

A string of chili peppers brightens the kitchen. Jayden isn’t optimistic that he’ll see any other colors in his new desert surroundings. His mom gives him a field guide to New Mexico at breakfast, and as he pages through it he doesn’t really think he’ll find any of the colorful flowers inside. But then, as he looks around, he spies the burgundy wine-cup and yellow bells that “wake up the desert with their silent ring.” He finds more flowers from the book that add red and purple to the landscape.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-firewheel-flowers

Image copyright Wendell Minor, 2020, text copyright Nikki Grimes, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Jayden walks on, farther away from his new house. The unfamiliar silence is broken by “the mad chatter of winged gossips passing secrets” from one piñon tree to another. He watches the long-tailed magpies swoop through the “deep waves of turquoise overhead” and wonders why he never saw so much sky in New York. Still, he misses looking up and seeing the grandeur of the skyscrapers.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-magpies

Image copyright Wendell Minor, 2020, text copyright Nikki Grimes, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Looking down again, Jayden finds a striped lizard that seems happy to run along his hand, tickle his fingers. Instead of seashells, he finds bones and an abandoned turtle shell. “What stories do they have to tell?” he wonders. He continues his walk and, upon turning the corner, finds himself in the shadow of a different kind of skyscraper—rugged, red, and rocky. On the air, Jayden hears his mom calling. He picks some flowers the colors of sunset to take home to her. He waves as he nears the house and sees her standing on the porch and flashes her “the first smile she’s seen since New York.” He thinks that maybe New Mexico can be Home.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-mom

Image copyright Wendell Minor, 2020, text copyright Nikki Grimes, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Nikki Grimes’ lyrical story is in plot a tale about moving from one part of the country to another, but in spirit it is a invitation for children and adults alike to open their heart to new experiences, to find the beauty in the unfamiliar and the joy in the unexpected. As Jayden journeys from New York to New Mexico and then around his new environment, Grimes explores honest emotions—the disappointment and anger change can bring, the preconceived ideas about the unknown that can color feelings and actions, and even that moment when a person can reject or accept the new circumstance or opportunity. As a poet, Grimes excels at the perfectly chosen detail and sublime description. Here, her words put readers in the spotlight of New Mexico’s laser sun, let them feel the skittering feet of a lizard, meet a haughty raven, and bask in the rainbow of colors Jayden never expected he’d see. His final smile and resolve to give his new city a chance fulfills the new dawning inherent in the title and is uplifting encouragement for all.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-flowers

Slouched down in his airplane seat, baseball cap pulled low over his eyes, Wendell Minor’s Jayden is a picture of despondency. But things begin to look brighter when, in the morning, he notices the mountains and colors he missed the night before. Minor’s sun-washed illustrations allow readers to discover the beauty of the New Mexico desert along with Jayden. His new home is light and open, with a timbered ceiling and windows free of the bars he’s used to. Minor’s use of perspective allows children to view sweeping vistas of the desert landscape as well as images of some of the creatures found there. Putting the raven front and center gives kids an idea of the size and attitude of this striking bird. Fiery reds and oranges, vivid yellows, pinks, and purples, and glorious blues punctuate the sandy backdrop as Jayden’s thoughtful expressions depict his growing appreciation for his new home.

An exquisite book for any child, whether they are moving to a new home, exploring new experiences, or keen observers of their surroundings, Southwest Sunrise would be a joyful addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 6

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1547600823

Discover more about Nikki Grimes  and her books as well as educator guides and resources on her website.

To learn more about Wendell Minor, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Go West Day Activity

Screen Shot 2020-07-11 at 9.36.56 PM

Beautiful Desert Coloring Pages

 

The desert has plants, animals, and landmarks seen nowhere else. Grab your crayons or pencils and give these two printable scenes some of its unique color.

Curious Rabbit Desert Scene | Western Sun Desert Scene

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-southwest-sunrise-cover

You can find Southwest Sunrise at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

April 8 – National Zoo Lovers Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-zoo-is-not-for-you-cover

About the Holiday

Zoos are wonderful places to see and learn about exotic animals from around the world. In addition to creating educational exhibits, zoological experts are involved in the preservation of endangered species. Although we can’t visit a zoo in person right now, there are still lots of ways to stay in touch with a zoo near you or even far away. Many zoos and aquariums provide webcams so you can check in with your favorite animals whenever you want. Connect online with your favorite zoo. Many are bringing the zoo to you with behind-the-scenes videos, activities for kids and families, and lots of learning opportunities. Here are a few to get you started: Dallas Zoo | Oregon Zoo | San Diego Zoo | Smithsonian’s National Zoo Monterey Bay Aquarium | Shedd Aquarium.

By Jakki Licare

This Zoo is Not for You

Written and Illustrated by Ross Collins

 

The zoo is holding interviews and when a platypus walks with an envelope in hand, Tiger assumes he’s there to apply for entry. Tiger rushes him through to the first interviewer, Panda. Panda thinks she is incredibly special and rare and isn’t impressed with platypus who doesn’t even eat bamboo! She concludes, “I think this zoo is not for you.”

Next, Platypus meets the flamingos. They talk about how beautiful and graceful they are, but they are disappointed platypus. He’s rather brown after all. The wild monkeys provide a very active interview for Platypus. They talk about all the tricks they can do like throw poo and play the kazoo. Does Platypus have any cool tricks? “If not, this zoo is not for you.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-zoo-is-not-for-you-panda

Copyright Ross Collins, 2018, courtesy of Nosy Crow.

Platypus passes a tree filled with multicolored chameleons. They greet him with: “We’re green, then red, then pink or blue. Is brownish-gray your only hue?” Unimpressed the chameleons send him on to Elephant. Elephant rudely tells him that he isn’t powerful or huge like him. Instead he’s small and weird and has “failed this interview.”

The other animals watch surprised as the Platypus drops his envelope on the ground and walks away. They look at each other, saying, “I’m not proud of that interview. I think I was unkind. Were you?” All the animals gather around and wonder what they can do to make it up to Platypus. Monkey picks up the envelope Platypus dropped. The other animals look shocked as monkey holds up the letter that platypus had left.

All the animals leave the zoo and head towards Platypus’s bus. The zoo animals apologize to Platypus. They realize they had gotten it wrong and that Platypus hadn’t wanted to join their zoo. He wanted to give them an invitation. They ask if Platypus would still be willing to be friends. Platypus tells them it’s all right, “this platybus is for all of us!” The animals climb aboard and party away together with a DJ, a hot tub, fancy drinks with little umbrellas, and, of course, a shiny disco ball.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-zoo-is-not-for-you-sorry

Copyright Ross Collins, 2018, courtesy of Nosy Crow.

Fun rhyming couplets paired with bold colorful illustrations make for a delightful read. Collins’s  rhymes have a wonderful rhythm that make the reader flow right through the book. The repetitive phrasing “this zoo is not for you,” makes it easy for young readers to join in.  All the zoo animals have  strong personalities which are further enhanced by Collins’s striking illustrations. The flamingos are drawn with their heads held high and stand out against a yellow background. The panda is slouched against her pile of panda souvenirs. The monkeys are all over the page: swinging, playing the kazoo, and, to many kids’ delight, flinging poo. 

Collins has provided many opportunities to discuss the problems of presumptions and the necessity for open mindedness. The zoo animals are snobs who quickly dismiss the platypus for being odd looking, brown, common, and unexciting. Their quick dismissals make it obvious to young readers that they are being judgmental. This Zoo is Not for You reminds all of us that  we should be open minded when meeting someone new. Another strong theme through the book is the necessity of making amends. When the zoo animals realize their mistake, they hang their heads looking sad. They realize they could have been kinder to the platypus and decide to apologize. Platypus graciously accepts their apologies and invites them in. The readers can see how apologies can solve conflicts and strengthen friendships.

A fun book in rhyme that offers a great opportunity to open discussions about presumptuousness, quick judgement, and forgiveness. This Zoo is Not for You would make a wonderful addition to home and classroom bookshelves.

Ages 3-7

Nosy Crow 2018| ISBN  978-1536200157

Discover more about Ross Collins, his books, and his art on his website.

You can find a game of This Zoo is Not for You! Animal Snap on the Nosy Crow website.

National Zoo Lovers Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Platybus-Craft-bus

Platybus Play Set

 

The Platybus has arrived at your house!  Print and accessorize your characters for their big party.

Supplies

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Platybus-Craft-animals

Directions

  1. Print out Platybus, characters and accessories.
  2. Cut out Platybus, characters and accessories. Make 6 slits marked on the platybus. These slits will hold the puppets in place.
  3. Glue characters to popsicle sticks.
  4. Glue accessories to characters.
  5. Slip puppets into bus.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-this-zoo-is-not-for-you-cover

You can find This Zoo Is Not for You at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review