November 15 – It’s National Gratitude Month

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About the Holiday

There are many things to be thankful for this month and all throughout the year. At the top of the list would be our friends—both old and new. Celebrate your friendships during the holidays and tell them how important they are in your life!

Two Lions sent me a copy of King Ben and Sir Rhino to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m also excited to be partnering with Two Lions in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

King Ben and Sir Rhino

By Eric Sailer

 

Ben was the king of his jungle—his room, his toys, and his servants called Mom and Dad. “Indeed, Ben had everything except a loyal subject.” When he demanded that the elephant, zebra, and monkey kids play with him, they just laughed and ran off. Then he met a rhinoceros!” The rhinoceros was happy to have someone to play with too as with a stick Ben knighted him “Sir Rhino.”

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Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

“Then fun was proclaimed.” First, Sir Rhino pushed Ben in the wagon, next up were games. The rhino became Ben’s soccer goal and ladder for him to reach the basketball net. At snack time Ben directed Sir Rhino to climb up on a stack of books piled on a chair to reach the cookies. Ben then doled them out—two for Sir Rhino and the rest for him.

After that Ben “decreed mayhem.” During a moment of rest, Ben noticed Sir Rhino playing with his own stuffed rhino toy. “Mine!” he demanded, swiping it from the rhino’s hands. “After all, a king can have what he wants.” But Sir Rhino had had enough. With tears in his eyes, he chased Ben around the room to recover his toy.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-king-ben-and-sir-rhino-meets-loyal-subject

Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Finally, he caught one of the little toy’s arm and tugged while Ben pulled on the other side. Suddenly, with a “RIP!” the rhino was holding only an arm. He ran from the room crying while Ben looked on confused. Ben looked around his empty court. He “missed his loyal subject…his favorite subject.” Then he knew what he had to do.

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Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Ben repaired Sir Rhino’s toy and set out to find him. He looked in treetops, under giraffe, down gopher holes, and even in the river. He finally found rhino alone on the swings. With an apologetic expression he held out Sir Rhino’s toy. “Will you still you still play with me?” Rhino embraced his toy…and Ben, and “a joyous celebration followed.” The next day they played together and Ben let Rhino play with his toys. “Now Ben knows that to be a great king of the jungle…he must be a great friend.” Now Ben even shares his crown!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-king-ben-and-sir-rhino-playing

Copyright Eric Sailer, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Author Eric Sailer’s debut picture book takes on the sometimes-tricky relationship between two new friends and shows little ones that sharing and consideration for others is what real friendship is all about. Sailer’s narrative text, incorporating called-out words such as proclaimed, declared, and decreed as well as words of royalty, sets the tone of Ben’s interactions with his parents and others while his dynamic illustrations show the effects of Ben’s entitled attitude on Rhino. Rhino’s initial excitement in making a friend turns to bewilderment, disappointment, and tears as Ben orders him around instead of treating him fairly. When Rhino leaves, Ben finally comes to the realization that his actions have consequences. He seeks out Rhino, apologizes, and discovers that sharing the limelight, his toys, snacks, and other things brings joy and true friendship.

For kids navigating the various paths of friendship, King Ben and Sir Rhino offers ways for adults to talk with their children about behavior and their relationships with classmates, siblings, and others.

Ages 4 – 7

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503939844

Discover more about Eric Sailer and his work on his website.

King Ben and Sir Rhino Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Two Lions Publishing in this giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of King Ben and Sir Rhino by Eric Sailer

To be entered to win, just Follow me on Twitter @CelebratePicBks and Retweet a giveaway tweet during this week, November 15 – 21. Already a follower? Thanks! Just  Retweet for a chance to win.

A winner will be chosen on November 22.

Giveaways open to US addresses only. | Prizing provided by Two Lions Publishing.

National Gratitude Month Activity

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Friends  Are A-Maze-ing! Maze

 

Three kids would like to help their friends build a snowman. Can you help them reach their friends int his printable Friends Are A-Maze-ing Puzzle?

Friends Are A-Maze-ing Maze | Friends Are A-Maze-ing Solution

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You can find King Ben and Sir Rhino at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

November 12 – It’s World Kindness Week

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About the Holiday

Today begins a week-long awareness of acts of kindness and how gestures of praise and encouragement of others can make life better for all. These days, when negativity seems all pervasive, take some time to look around and really see the goodness that is being done. Take a vow to join in and help make the world a better place for you and especially for your children. Just a smile, a single nice word or a helpful action can make a tremendous difference. To celebrate this week’s holiday, seek out opportunities to say something nice to your family members, friends, coworkers, and those you meet along the way.

Be Kind

Written by Pat Zietlow Miller | Illustrated by Jen Hill

 

At school during snack time when Tanisha spilled grape juice on her new dress, the class burst out laughing. One student remembered that their mom always taught them to be kind and tried to make Tanisha feel better by saying, “Purple is my favorite color.” The student thought Tanisha would smile, but she just ran away. All during art class, Tanisha’s classmate thought about what they should have done instead, wondering, “What does it mean to be kind anyway?”

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Image copyright Jen Hill, 2018, text copyright Pat Zietlow Miller, 2018. Courtesy of us.macmillan.com.

They think, “Maybe it’s giving.” Like baking treats for someone who lives alone, or giving away old clothes to someone who can use them. Helping out might also show kindness. For instance, “putting dirty dishes in the sink” or taking care of a pet. Paying attention to others could be another way to show you care. Like noticing someone’s new shoes, offering to be the new girl’s partner in class, or even just listening to someone’s stories—even if you’ve heard them before. Sometimes being kind is easy, but there are other times when it can be challenging or even scary—“like sticking up for someone when other kids aren’t kind.”

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Image copyright Jen Hill, 2018, text copyright Pat Zietlow Miller, 2018. Courtesy of us.macmillan.com.

The child decides that maybe all they can do for Tanisha is to sit near her and paint her a picture of purple and green—of pretty violets. They hope that small acts like these will join with other people’s and that they will expand, fanning out from school into the community, across the country, around the world, and back. “So we can be kind. Again. And again. And again.”

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Image copyright Jen Hill, 2018, text copyright Pat Zietlow Miller, 2018. Courtesy of us.macmillan.com.

Miller’s tender prose is perfect for planting the seeds of kindness and opening discussions about what it means to be caring and compassionate. With more and more children speaking up and creating change, Miller’s gentle and affirming story shows readers that it’s often the little things that count the most. Some of the examples she gives are acts that many children may do already, confirming their innate sensitivity, while others may spark new ideas and expand readers’ definition of kindness.

Jen Hill’s soft-hued illustrations beautifully depict the emotional tug at the heart that Tanisha’s spilled grape juice sets in motion for the protagonist and young readers. As one caring child wonders what kindness really is, Hill clearly portrays diverse children helping out at home, at school, and in their community locally and—as the kindness spreads—around the world. Hill draws the caring student with gender neutral clothing and hair, allowing all children to relate to the story’s main character. 

Be Kind is a lovely perceptive and sensitive book that would be an asset to any home or classroom library.

Ages 3 – 6

Roaring Brook Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-1626723214

Discover more about Pat Zietlow Miller and her books on her website.

To learn more about Jen Hill, her books, and her art, visit her website.

World Kindness Week Activity

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Say Something Nice! Cards

 

Do you want to give someone a nice surprise? Print out these cards and give one to a friend, to someone you’d like to know, or to anyone who looks like they need a pick-me-up! If you’d like to make your own cards, print out the blank template and write and/or draw your own message! You can also print these on adhesive paper and make your own stickers.

Say Something Nice! Cards | Say Something Nice! Cards Blank Template

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-be-kind-cover

You can find Be Kind at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

 

Picture book review

October 17 – It’s National Bullying Prevention Month

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About the Holiday

Every day bullying affects children and adults across this country and worldwide. Overt and subtle, in person and online, bullying destroys happiness, taints school and workplace environments, and sows an atmosphere of distrust and discord. Who can help? Each one of us! National Bullying Prevention Month reminds us that by treating others kindly and with empathy, our world can become a friendlier, more harmonious place. Instituted by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center in 2006, the holiday encourages people to think about how they treat others and provides assistance for schools and others to make positive change. To learn more about what you can do as well as to find classroom toolkits and other resources and information on Unity Day, celebrated on October 24, visit PACER’s website.

Two Lions sent me a copy of What If Everybody Said That? to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m also happy to be partnering with Two Lions in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

What If Everybody Said That?

Written by Ellen Javernick | Illustrated by Colleen Madden

 

At the playground a little girl dressed as a pirate and standing on the prow of her sandbox ship greeted three boys wanting to play with, “‘No boys allowed.’” Their mom overheard her and yelled, “‘What if everybody said that?’” If everybody did say such things would the play tube be off-limits to kids with freckles or the swings forbidden to big kids or the ladder for boys to climb only? That would make some kids pretty mad.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

In art class the girl looked at the other kids’ drawings of dogs. She admits she said: “‘Those don’t look like dogs to me,’ and I laughed.”“‘What if EVERYBODY said that?’” her teacher asked. Then most kids would crumple up their work, throw it away, or even decided they would “never draw again.” At sharing time, this little girl threw a fit because she wanted to be first and talk about her new shoes. What happened? “Our teacher frowned at me and said, ‘What if EVERYBODY said that?’” What an uproar that would cause as all the kids clamored to show their special things.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

When the girl told a boy in her class that his new glasses made him look funny, the principal called her on it. Imagine how the new girl would feel if she saw the texts between two of her classmates, monstagurl15 and badfish8—“Those braces!” “LOL!!! Metal Mouth” “What’s w/the flowers in her hair?” “W.e.i.r.d.o!” “Tohhhtallly.”—when she thought the flowers looked pretty and there’s nothing you can do about braces.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

What if no one in the world would share or send others good wishes? What if everyone scared others for a laugh and quit as soon as things didn’t go their way? What kind of world would it be if no one became friends? Finally, the little girl reflects on her attitude toward others and realizes what her life would be like if she was all alone. She has a change of heart, apologizes to the new girl in the neighborhood that she ignored, and invites her to play.

Now she asks readers to imagine what life would be like if everybody said things like “‘Let’s be friends.” “Welcome to the neighborhood!” Oh! Your cat is sooooo pretty!” The world would be an awesome place if everyone invited others along on life’s journey.

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Image copyright Colleen Madden, 2018, text copyright Ellen Javernick. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Through one girl’s self-described journey to enlightenment, Ellen Javernick powerfully engages readers in thinking about how what they say and do affects others. As the girl relates circumstances in which she snubbed others, put herself first, insulted other kids’ efforts, and was mean in many other ways on the left-hand page while on the right-hand side are several more examples of the results of bullying behavior. Javernick’s examples are realistic and span a wide range of types of bullying from hurtful comments to snarky texts to thinking only of oneself. Each page offers opportunities for discussion, reflection, and learning.

Colleen Madden’s emotion-filled illustrations show  what kind of world we would live in if everybody rejected, ignored, and bullied others. Faces of the children and adults clearly show emotions of smugness, anger, disappointment, and sadness. Sprinkled throughout in thought bubbles and as decorations are emojis that readers will recognize and understand. Madden’s images work hand-in-hand with Javernick’s story to give both kids and adult readers much to think about.

An excellent book to discuss how one person’s words and actions affect others, What If Everybody Said That would be a terrific addition to home, classroom, and library bookshelves.

Ages 3 – 8

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503948952

What If Everybody Said That? Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Two Lions Publishing in this giveaway of

  • One (1) copy of What If Everybody Said That? written by Ellen Javernick | illustrated by Colleen Madden

To be entered to win, just Follow me on Twitter @CelebratePicBks and Retweet a giveaway tweet during this week, October 17 – 23. Already a follower? Thanks! Just  Retweet for a chance to win.

A winner will be chosen on October 24.

Giveaways open to US addresses only. | Prizing provided by Two Lions Publishing.

National Bullying Prevention Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-say-something-nice-cards

Say Something Nice! Cards

 

Do you want to give someone a nice surprise? Print out these cards and give one to a friend, to someone you’d like to know, or to anyone who looks like they need a pick-me-up! If you’d like to make your own cards, print out the blank template and write and/or draw your own message! You can also print these on adhesive paper and make your own stickers.

Say Something Nice! Cards | Say Something Nice! Cards Blank Template

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-what-if-everybody-said-that-cover

You can find What If Everybody Said That? at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

August 29 – It’s Back to School Month

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About the Holiday

Well, Monday is Labor Day, and the official ending of summer. While the carefree (or were they even more hectic?) days of summer vacation are coming to a close, a new school year is just beginning. Make this one the best yet by talking with your kids about their day and your day. Taking time to read together—no matter how old your kids are—is another way to build bonds. Why not start with today’s funny and insightful book!

We Don’t Eat Our Classmates

By Ryan T. Higgins

 

Penelope Rex was nervous about her first day of school. She wondered whether her classmates would be nice and how many teeth they would have. Her mom had gotten her a backpack decorated with ponies, and her dad had made three-hundred tuna sandwiches for her lunch. Both of these made Penelope smile because both ponies and tuna were delicious.

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Copyright Ryan T. Higgins, 2018, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

On the first day of school, Penelope walked into her classroom only to discover that “all of her classmates were CHILDREN! Penelope loved children! “Because children are delicious.” Right away Penelope ate them all up. Her teacher, Mrs. Noodleman, was not happy and told Penelope to “‘Please spit them out at once!’” Deposited back on the carpet, the saliva-covered kids were not too happy either.

Penelope tried to be good on the playground, during creative time, and at lunch, but she couldn’t help trying to eat the other kids. She couldn’t figure out why she wasn’t making any friends. When she got home, though, and told her dad, he had a pretty good idea why she’d been so lonely.

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Copyright Ryan T. Higgins, 2018, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

Her dad told her that eating children made it hard to make friends. Penelope thought and thought about this. The next day she tried to keep her teeth to herself, but the kids really were so delicious that Penelope just had to take a bite. The kids were terrified. The only one who didn’t run away from her was Walter, the class goldfish. Penelope tried to be friends, but when she poked her finger into his bowl—“CHOMP!”

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Copyright Ryan T. Higgins, 2018, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

Penelope screamed and then she cried. She didn’t like being Walter’s snack and suddenly realized why the kids didn’t like her. The whole experience ruined her appetite for children, but she discovered that once she stopped eating them, the kids wanted to be her friend. Sometimes, the children still look a little tantalizing, but when that happens Penelope just “peeks at Walter and remembers what it’s like when someone tries to eat you.” And Walter? He “stares right back and licks his lips. Because dinosaurs are delicious.”

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Copyright Ryan T. Higgins, 2018, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

With We Don’t Eat Our Classmates, Higgins dips his pen into the Edward Gorey pool of gloriously grisly storytelling that so delights kids. If you want children to laugh out loud, respond with “Ewww!” and “Yuck!” and then laugh some more during story time, you’ll want to pick up this book. Kids will give Penelope plenty of “Awwws!” too as she tries so hard to understand why her classmates are afraid as well as to overcome her natural instincts and love for a tasty snack. In an unexpected and hilarious twist, goggle-eyed Walter inadvertently teaches Penelope a few valuable lessons.

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Higgins’ little yellow dino in pink overalls is adorable as she revels in her pony backpack, hopes for a child-sized treat, and plays with new friends. Her sad eyes and bewildered expression after a day at school will spark plenty of empathy too. Penelope’s classmates are a most welcome representation of diversity, and her classroom—with two cozy reading nooks—is as cool as it gets.

For back to school and all year through, We Don’t Eat Our Classmates will be a favorite on home bookshelves and in classroom libraries.

Ages 4 – 7

Disney-Hyperion, 2018 | ISBN 978-1368003551

To learn more about Ryan T. Higgins, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Back-to-School Month Activity

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Books to Love, Books to Read Book Bag

 

Are the kids going back to school? Then they need a bag to carry their favorite books and stuff in! This easy-to-make book bag—recycled from the cloth bag sheet sets come in—makes a perfect kid-sized bag for taking to the library or after-school activities! 

Supplies

  • Printable Templates: Books to Read Template | Books to Love Template
  • Small cloth bag, available from craft or sewing stores—Recyclable Idea: I used the bag that sheet sets now come in
  • Cloth trim or strong ribbon, available from craft or sewing stores—Recyclable Idea: I used the cloth handles from shopping bags provided from some clothing stores
  • Scraps of different colored and patterned cloth. Or use quilting squares, available at craft and sewing stores
  • Pen or pencil for tracing letters onto cloth
  • Scissors
  • Small sharp scissors (or cuticle scissors) for cutting out the center of the letters
  • Fabric glue
  • Thread (optional)
  • Needle (optional)

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Directions

    1. Print the sayings and cut out the letters
    2. Trace letters onto different kinds of cloth
    3. Cut out cloth letters
    4. Iron cloth bag if necessary
    5. Attach words “Books to Read” to one side of bag with fabric glue
    6. Attach words “Books to Love” to other side of bag with fabric glue
    7. Cut cloth trim or ribbon to desired length to create handles
    8. Glue (or sew) handles onto the inside edge of bag

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-we-don't-eat-our-classmates

You can find We Don’t Eat Our Classmates at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

July 16 – World Snake Day

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About the Holiday

Of all the creatures in the animal kingdom, none may inspire such fierce emotions as snakes. And while there are plenty of species that rightly strike fear into people’s hearts, there are also many snakes that are beautiful and mild-mannered. As predators, snakes play a vital role in providing balance in the ecosystem. More than 3, 458 species are found in every part of the world, including frozen tundras and deep oceans, but habitat destruction, pollution, and other dangers threaten their population. To celebrate today’s holiday, read up on snakes or watch a documentary about these fascinating creatures. You may find yourself embracing them – just maybe not as much as the star of today’s book!

Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard (Wee Beasties Series)

Written by Ame Dyckman | Illustrated by Alex G. Griffiths

 

Huggy the Python LOVES a lot of things. And he “LOVES to hug the things he loves.” It’s just that Huggy is missing a bit of …well… hug control. When he sees something he loves—like a balloon—he rushes over and gently, gently wraps himself around it. But, really, one more little squeeze won’t hurt, right? Oh dear! “Pop! Oops! You hugged too hard, Huggy.”

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Image copyright Alex Griffiths, 2018, text copyright Ame Dyckman. Courtesy of Little Simon.

Maybe some ice cream will turn that frown upside down. Okay, spoon’s at the ready… so far so good. A little scoop… Yummm! That bowl needs just a leeetle hug. Oh no! What a mess! There’s even whipped cream and a cherry on top of Huggy’s very tall top hat! Perhaps a “fuzzy little dog” will cheer him up. Huggy’s all ready to give that puppy a hug when—“WAIT!” Maybe the reader can “show Huggy how to be gentle.” That’s right! So sweet!

Now it’s Huggy’s turn to show what he learned. Huggy looks a little uncertain as he stares down into those big puppy dog eyes. But he picks the puppy up and snuggles “just right.” But that tube of toothpaste in his tail? Well, you’ll see!

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Image copyright Alex Griffiths, 2018, text copyright Ame Dyckman. Courtesy of Little Simon.

Part of Ame Dyckman’s new Wee Beasties series of social skills board books—which includes Roary the Lion Roars Too Loud and Touchy the Octopus Touches Everything—Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard addresses the penchant of little ones to show just how full of love their heart really is. Combining examples that will elicit giggles, wording that prompts fun dramatic readings that toddlers can easily join in on, and a page that allows kids to practice giving just the right squeeze, Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard gently teaches restraint in a story little ones will want to read again and again.

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Alex G. Griffiths’ Huggy is a dapper cutie with his blue scarf, feathered top hat, and big, ready smile. As he whips over to show the balloon how much he loves it or cozies up to a tall dish of ice cream, his enthusiasm is infectious, but a POP! and a SQUISH! later that happy grin is a full-on frown. When Huggy wants to show some love to the little puppy, it’s up to readers to show him how it’s done. And no little one will be able to resist giving the book a snuggle when they see the sweet puppy’s outstretched arms! Griffiths’ cleverly uses nearly identical imagery when the balloon and the ice cream succumb to Huggy’s squeeze in order to show young readers the unwanted consequence of over-zealous hugs. The smiles all around when Huggy and the puppy connect just right will have little ones smiling too—and ready to give plenty of hugs.

Offering a peppy, playful way to teach young children how to hug pets, babies, friends, and even their toys as well an opportunity to discuss various emotions, Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard would be a favorite addition to any toddler’s home bookshelf and a terrific choice for daycare, preschool, and kindergarten libraries.

Ages 2 – 5

Little Simon, 2018 | ISBN 978-1534410800    

Discover more about Ame Dyckman and her books on her website.

To learn more about Alex G. Griffiths, his books, and his art, visit his website.

World Snake Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-goodness-snakes-matching-puzzle

Goodness Snakes! Matching Puzzle

 

These twin snakes slithered away from each other! Can you match them up again in this printable Goodness Snakes! Matching Puzzle?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-wee-beasties-huggy-the-python-hugs-too-hard-cover

You can find Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard  at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 30 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

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About the Holiday

Get Caught Reading Month was established in 1999 by the Association of American Publishers to encourage people of all ages to read more. Authors, illustrators, celebrities, athletes, and others participate by sharing pictures of themselves reading an old favorite or new book on social media. Schools, libraries, bookstores, and community venues hold special programs throughout the month. For more information and to find resources, visit the Get Caught Reading website.

Albie Newton

Written by Josh Funk | Illustrated by Ester Garay

 

Albie Newton was something of a prodigy. As a tyke, he retrofitted his stroller into a racecar, tried counting to infinity, and “learned to speak a language almost every week: / English, Spanish, Hindi, Klingon, Gibberish, then Greek.” When he moves to a new town and a new school, his classmates are excited to meet him. Albie is also revved up to start making friends, and he has a plan he thinks the other kids will love.

But as they all settle in to work, “the students noticed Albie was a whiz. / Albie wrote a sonnet while they took a spelling quiz.” During art class, the kids were likewise astounded (and a little dismayed) when, while they scribbled, drew swirls, and made handprints, Albie painted like Van Gogh. When free time rolled around, and some kids played dress up, Albie “sifted through the trash,” to build a science lab, leaving a mess for Arjun to clean up.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-albie-newton-toddler

Image copyright Ester Garay, 2018, text copyright Josh Funk, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Then things began to disappear. “Hamilton the hamster tried to run but had no wheel. / Albie needed extra sprockets made of stainless steel.” While Sona and Shirley created paper masks, the glue went missing, and Albie “didn’t even ask.” The wings from Dave’s propeller plane were suddenly broken off, and reading time became impossible when “booming pandemonium descended on the school.” Albie, though, intent on his invention, didn’t notice the trouble he was causing or the crowd of angry kids rushing to complain.

Before they could reach Albie, though, Shirley stopped them, saying “‘maybe Albie didn’t know. Let’s look at what he made.’ Curious, the children headed straight to where he played.” When they say all the inventions Albie had made, they stopped and stared. Albie had made the class a gift—a spaceship, and with the push of a button, an amazing time machine!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-albie-newton-spelling

Image copyright Ester Garay, 2018, text copyright Josh Funk, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

With his inimitable style, Josh Funk creates a rambunctious tale of invention and creativity, but one that also has a deeper message about the way some kids see the world and communicate with peers and others. In the first pages, readers are introduced to the precocious Albie, who from birth has demonstrated a talent for learning and doing. When he enters a new school, however, his single focus doesn’t translate into the kinds of social interactions his classmates are used to. Albie gathers materials for his present unaware of the mayhem he’s causing, just as the other kids are unaware of Albie’s real goal. Only Shirley is sensitive to the idea that Albie may not be causing havoc on purpose but for a purpose. Her calming defense of Albie allows the other kids to see Albie in a new light and appreciate his gift—and his gifts.

While Funk’s rhyming verses are focusing on Albie and his actions, Ester Garay’s bright illustrations depict the other kids’ reactions to his talents and also his disruptions. A first hint at how Albie fits in with his new class comes as the kids welcome him with cheer and smiles. Instead of facing them to accept the welcome, Albie is faced away from them, happily imagining the gift he will make for them.

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Image copyright Ester Garay, 2018, text copyright Josh Funk, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Throughout the day, Shirley follows Albie, and as she watches and wonders, her facial expressions demonstrate dismay at some of Albie’s antics but also a growing understanding and acceptance. Garay captures the close camaraderie of a preschool or kindergarten classroom, and her close-up view of Albie toiling away on his invention will have readers eager to see the result. The reveal of Albie’s spaceship time machine and the final spread of the kids frolicking on a distant planet with the likes of Freda Kahlo, William Shakespeare, Amelia Earhart, and a helpful dino, are sure to produce some oohs and ahhhs.

Albie Newton is a doubly impactful story that would be a welcome addition to home and, most especially, classroom bookshelves. It can be read as a boisterous story of innovation for lively story times, but it also provides adults and children an opportunity to discuss the ideas of social interaction and various personalities. Most children know someone like Albie who as naturally quiet, on the spectrum, or singularly focused on one area or another, communicates and socializes differently than others. Reading Albie Newton can help kids better understand different behaviors and, like Shirley, become more sensitive to all their classmates and friends.

Ages 5 – 9

Sterling Children’s Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1454922582

Discover more about Josh Funk and his books as well as find fun activities and lots of resources on his website.

To learn more about Ester Garay, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Check out the Albie Newton book trailer!

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-initial-bookend

Initial Bookends

 

You can keep your books neat and tidy on the shelf with this easy-to-make bookend that displays your talents and personality!

Supplies

  • Wooden letter block in the child’s first initial or both initials
  • Chalkboard paint
  • Chalk
  • Paint brush

Directions

  1. Paint the wooden letter with the chalkboard paint, let dry
  2. With the chalk, write words that your think best describe you on the letter
  3. Display your letter on your bookshelf!

May 14 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

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About the Holiday

Reading is great all the time, but this month you like to be seen actually with the book in hand laughing at a funny line, shivering over a mysterious setting, or maybe even tearing up over a plot twist. Throughout the month, authors, illustrators, actors and actresses, athletes, business people, teachers, and students all upload pictures of themselves reading to encourage others to discover the joys of reading. To learn more and find resources for teachers and librarians to download and posters to order, visit the Get Caught Reading website.

Three Little Monkeys

Written by Quentin Blake | Illustrated by Emma Chichester Clark

 

Whenever Hilda Snibbs came home, the first thing she did was call out “‘I’m home! Where are you?’” You  might think she was talking to her kids, her dog, or her cat, but she was actually addressing her three little monkeys whose “names were Tim and Sam and Lulu.” Hilda was sure to give them healthy snacks because “they were very lively.”

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

One day when Hilda went to the grocery store, the monkeys grew bored. They opened the hall closet and “threw everything into the hall.” They opened the umbrellas, tore the laces from all the shoes, and plucked all the feathers from Hilda’s favorite hat. When Hilda came home and saw the mess she had one thing to say: “‘I’m really very disappointed in such naughty little monkeys.” Tim, Sam, and Lulu just gazed at her silently.

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Image copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, text copyright Quentin Blake, 2016. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

The next day Hilda went to the hat store. Before she left she told her little monkeys to be good. But as soon as she was out the door, they hurried to the living room to play. They upended the wastebasket, spilled the flower vase, tore the newspapers, and tangled Hilda’s knitting into knots. “When Hilda came home and went into the living room she found the most awful mess. There were flowers all over the place. And her poor knitting!” She admonished the little monkeys, but they just “looked at her with their big round eyes and said nothing.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-living-room

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Needing more wool, Hilda headed into town the next day with a reminder to her monkeys to be good while she was away. But the kitchen was so enticing, and they tossed everything out of the cupboards, scattered the powdered soap, emptied the trashcan, and tipped the soup pan onto the floor. This time when Hilda got home, she became angry. “‘Great grief! How long can I put up with these terrible little monkeys?’” But Tim, Sam, and Lulu just smiled at her.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-kitchen

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

The next day was market day again and once again the monkeys grew bored as soon as Hilda was gone. The bathroom was a perfect playroom with its toilet paper to unroll, toothpaste tube to squeeze, and shampoo to splash around. Hilda nearly tore her hair out when she returned to this mayhem. As she stared at her monkeys wrapped in toilet paper and sporting sudsy costumes, she cried, “‘Oh, for a peaceful life without these wicked little monkeys!’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-closet

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Before going out the next morning, Hilda gave Tim, Sam, and Lulu a stern talking to. It was late when she returned and as she stepped through the door something seemed amiss. The living room was in perfect order, the kitchen was spotless, and the bathroom shone. Hilda broke down in tears. Something horrible must have happened to her three little monkeys. Her handkerchief was soaked through, and when she went to the closet to get a new one, she found Tim, Sam, and Lulu waiting quietly for her.

Hilda hugged them all and “that night…went up the stairs to bed with a happy heart.” As she got under the covers, she found herself lying on all her forks, spoons, and cans of sardines. “But that is the kind of thing you have to expect if you have three little monkeys.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-coming-home

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Quentin Blake’s hilarious tale of three little monkeys has all the charm and style of classic storytelling that will set young readers giggling and eagerly anticipating each of Hilda’s trips into town. Adults with “little monkeys” of their own will anticipate the tenderhearted ending, and children will be delighted with the assurance of enduring love Hilda’s tears provide. A dramatic reading of Hilda’s increasing frustration with her mischievous charges will enthrall listeners as they gaze at the reader with the same sweet expression as Tim, Sam, and Lulu.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-three-little-monkeys-gazing

Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Emma Chichester Clark’s sophisticated illustrations begin on the endpapers, where Hilda is leaving her elegant brownstone under the watchful gaze of her little monkeys. Tim, Sam, and Lulu are as cute as can be as they happily eat their snack and give a hint of the shenanigans to come. With each new day, the monkeys get into more and more trouble, leading to wonderful, fully detailed two-page masterpieces of the mayhem they cause. Hilda’s growing consternation is clear in her facial expressions and gestures. Kids will love Hilda’s collection of hats and matching outfits and scenes of her home. When Hilda comes home to a pristine house, the brightly colored pages turn as gray as a cloudy day. The sunny hues return with the discovery of her precious little ones, and the bedtime surprise is a delight.

Ages 4 – 8

HarperCollins, 2017 | ISBN 978-0062670670

Discover more about Quentin Blake, his books, and his illustration work on his website

To learn more about Emma Chichester Clark, her books, and her paintings, visit her website.

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monkey-bookmark

Just Hanging Around! Bookmark

 

Monkeys love hanging around! Print this Just Hanging Around! Bookmark, color it and then let this little one save your page until you come back to reading! 

Picture Book Review