May 14 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

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About the Holiday

Reading is great all the time, but this month you like to be seen actually with the book in hand laughing at a funny line, shivering over a mysterious setting, or maybe even tearing up over a plot twist. Throughout the month, authors, illustrators, actors and actresses, athletes, business people, teachers, and students all upload pictures of themselves reading to encourage others to discover the joys of reading. To learn more and find resources for teachers and librarians to download and posters to order, visit the Get Caught Reading website.

Three Little Monkeys

Written by Quentin Blake | Illustrated by Emma Chichester Clark

 

Whenever Hilda Snibbs came home, the first thing she did was call out “‘I’m home! Where are you?’” You  might think she was talking to her kids, her dog, or her cat, but she was actually addressing her three little monkeys whose “names were Tim and Sam and Lulu.” Hilda was sure to give them healthy snacks because “they were very lively.”

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

One day when Hilda went to the grocery store, the monkeys grew bored. They opened the hall closet and “threw everything into the hall.” They opened the umbrellas, tore the laces from all the shoes, and plucked all the feathers from Hilda’s favorite hat. When Hilda came home and saw the mess she had one thing to say: “‘I’m really very disappointed in such naughty little monkeys.” Tim, Sam, and Lulu just gazed at her silently.

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Image copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, text copyright Quentin Blake, 2016. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

The next day Hilda went to the hat store. Before she left she told her little monkeys to be good. But as soon as she was out the door, they hurried to the living room to play. They upended the wastebasket, spilled the flower vase, tore the newspapers, and tangled Hilda’s knitting into knots. “When Hilda came home and went into the living room she found the most awful mess. There were flowers all over the place. And her poor knitting!” She admonished the little monkeys, but they just “looked at her with their big round eyes and said nothing.”

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Needing more wool, Hilda headed into town the next day with a reminder to her monkeys to be good while she was away. But the kitchen was so enticing, and they tossed everything out of the cupboards, scattered the powdered soap, emptied the trashcan, and tipped the soup pan onto the floor. This time when Hilda got home, she became angry. “‘Great grief! How long can I put up with these terrible little monkeys?’” But Tim, Sam, and Lulu just smiled at her.

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

The next day was market day again and once again the monkeys grew bored as soon as Hilda was gone. The bathroom was a perfect playroom with its toilet paper to unroll, toothpaste tube to squeeze, and shampoo to splash around. Hilda nearly tore her hair out when she returned to this mayhem. As she stared at her monkeys wrapped in toilet paper and sporting sudsy costumes, she cried, “‘Oh, for a peaceful life without these wicked little monkeys!’”

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Before going out the next morning, Hilda gave Tim, Sam, and Lulu a stern talking to. It was late when she returned and as she stepped through the door something seemed amiss. The living room was in perfect order, the kitchen was spotless, and the bathroom shone. Hilda broke down in tears. Something horrible must have happened to her three little monkeys. Her handkerchief was soaked through, and when she went to the closet to get a new one, she found Tim, Sam, and Lulu waiting quietly for her.

Hilda hugged them all and “that night…went up the stairs to bed with a happy heart.” As she got under the covers, she found herself lying on all her forks, spoons, and cans of sardines. “But that is the kind of thing you have to expect if you have three little monkeys.”

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Quentin Blake’s hilarious tale of three little monkeys has all the charm and style of classic storytelling that will set young readers giggling and eagerly anticipating each of Hilda’s trips into town. Adults with “little monkeys” of their own will anticipate the tenderhearted ending, and children will be delighted with the assurance of enduring love Hilda’s tears provide. A dramatic reading of Hilda’s increasing frustration with her mischievous charges will enthrall listeners as they gaze at the reader with the same sweet expression as Tim, Sam, and Lulu.

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Copyright Emma Chichester Clark, 2016, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Emma Chichester Clark’s sophisticated illustrations begin on the endpapers, where Hilda is leaving her elegant brownstone under the watchful gaze of her little monkeys. Tim, Sam, and Lulu are as cute as can be as they happily eat their snack and give a hint of the shenanigans to come. With each new day, the monkeys get into more and more trouble, leading to wonderful, fully detailed two-page masterpieces of the mayhem they cause. Hilda’s growing consternation is clear in her facial expressions and gestures. Kids will love Hilda’s collection of hats and matching outfits and scenes of her home. When Hilda comes home to a pristine house, the brightly colored pages turn as gray as a cloudy day. The sunny hues return with the discovery of her precious little ones, and the bedtime surprise is a delight.

Ages 4 – 8

HarperCollins, 2017 | ISBN 978-0062670670

Discover more about Quentin Blake, his books, and his illustration work on his website

To learn more about Emma Chichester Clark, her books, and her paintings, visit her website.

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

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Just Hanging Around! Bookmark

 

Monkeys love hanging around! Print this Just Hanging Around! Bookmark, color it and then let this little one save your page until you come back to reading! 

Picture Book Review

January 17 – It’s Hobby Month

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About the Holiday

Hobbies are great! They give us the chance to explore our creative side, form friendships, travel, and get away from the stresses of daily life. Sometimes hobbies can even lead to better and more satisfying careers. This month celebrate your hobby! Throw a party for others who share your passion, consider signing up with an online site to sell your wares, or join a group of like-minded people. It’s also a wonderful time to share your talents with others—like the protagonist of today’s story! 

Prudence the Part-Time Cow

Written by Jody Jensen Shaffer | Illustrated by Stephanie Laberis

 

Out in the pasture swatting flies with her tail and lumbering along with the rest of the herd, “Prudence looked like a full-time cow.” But when she had a little time off from her bovine duties, Prudence “was a part-time cow.” While being milked she was a scientist, reading a book on the milking process that she found “udderly amazing.” The salt licks were perfect blocks for architect Prudence’s wondrous structures. And engineer Prudence experimented with automatic lighting, even if the results in the water trough were a bit electrifying.

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Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

The other cows didn’t like it. They wanted Prudence to be more like them. She would never fit into the herd, they whispered to each other. Prudence fretted. She wanted to have friends and fit in, so “she decided to try to be like the others.” Dutifully, she went down to the pond with the rest of the herd for a little refreshment and was doing fine until… “she calculated the water temperature and wind speed. ‘Sixty-eight degrees and four miles per hour.’”

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Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

The other cows were miffed, especially Bessie, who said “‘Cows don’t calculate,’” while carefully counting her calves as she called them from the pond. Another day as the herd lazed under a tree, Prudence joined them, leaving only once to create a hat from an old wagon wheel, scrap of cloth, and piece of rope she found nearby. The other cows snorted. “‘Cows don’t create,’ said Patty as she jostled to find some shade.”

Even sleeping the same way as the others was difficult for Prudence. When she had a brainstorm in the middle of the night she just had to explore it—no matter how noise she made. The herd had given up. Alone and sad, Prudence thought and thought of ways to make the others like her. Then it hit her! “‘Cow Power!’” That night the barn rang with the sounds of her idea. But it wasn’t only one idea! When the herd woke and saw yet another contraption, they rolled their eyes and said “‘Not again, Prudence! What is this mess?’” Until…

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Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

Bessie saw the “cow-culator” Prudence had made to help her keep track of her calves. Patty was thrilled with the “portable shade tree” made from an umbrella, a saddle, and some dangly adornments. And Spotz thought his new guitar made from a shovel and fishing line was “gnarly.” Prudence was suddenly pretty popular! Even though “she knew she would always be a part-time cow,” she was happy to feel like a “full-time member of the herd.”

celebrate-picture-books-pciture-book-review-prudence-the-part-time-cow-happy-animals

Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

Jody Jensen Shaffer’s moooving and funny story of a cow with a scientific bent will delight kids. Little ones who think differently will empathize with Prudence’s wish to be herself while also fitting in with the herd. As the cows stand around in a pond and huddle under a tree, Shaffer offers a wink to the crowd mentality and peer pressure that can foster inaction and clone-like behavior. Prudence makes a gentle, but determined role model as a thinker who won’t be cowed by others’ opinions.

Stephanie Laberis’s cartoon-inspired illustrations of a herd of very distinct cows are a perfect accompaniment to this humorous story with a meaningful message. Prudence, with her fluff of pink hair, is happiest when fulfilling her creative visions. As the other cows disparage her efforts and isolate her from the herd, Prudence’s sad eyes and droopy tail and ears make the effect of their words obvious. Each page offers an opportunity for readers to discuss diversity, individuality, and what it means to be a friend.

Prudence the Part-Time Cow would be a wonderful addition to school and classroom libraries as well as to home bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Henry Holt and Co, 2017 | ISBN 978-1627796156

Find out all about Jody Jensen Shaffer and her books and magazine writing for children on her website!

Discover a gallery of illustration and craft work by Stephanie Laberis on her website!

Hobby Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cow-mug-craftMooo Mug

 

Milk—regular or chocolate!—will taste so much better in a Mooo Mug  you make yourself! 

Supplies

  • White ceramic mug, available at craft stores
  • Black permanent marker or paint for ceramics
  • Pink permanent marker or paint for ceramics
  • Brown permanent marker or paint for ceramics

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Directions

  1. With the pink marker or paint, draw an oval shape for the nose near the bottom of the mug. Let dry.
  2. With the brown marker or paint, draw two angled nostrils inside the pink oval and color them in. Let dry.
  3. Color in the nose with the pink marker or paint.
  4. With the black marker, color the top tip of the handle where it meets the mug to make the tail.
  5. With the black marker or paint, draw two wavy lines on either side of the face starting at the top, angling toward the middle and returning to the bottom of the mug. Leave white space between the lines.
  6. Draw circles for eyes within the black lines. Add black pupils at the bottom of the eyes.
  7. Color inside the black lines and around the eyes to make the face markings.
  8. With the black marker or paint, make two or three splotches on the back of the mug.
  9. Let the mug dry and follow the directions for the markers or paint to set the color.
  10. Pour yourself a mooo mug of milk and enjoy!

Picture Book Review

November 3 – World Jellyfish Day

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About the Holiday

Jellyfish may be some of the most fascinating creatures in the sea, and they are certainly among the most beautiful. Often seen in groups—called swarms, blooms, or smacks—these ancient ocean invertebrates can be transparent, yellow, red, blue, and even effervescent. Jellyfish capture prey and defend themselves by emitting toxins through painful stings. To celebrate today’s holiday, visit a local aquarium or—if you live in a climate where jellyfish are present at this time of year, head to the beach to watch them in their natural habitat.

Peanut Butter and Jellyfish

By Jarrett J. Krosoczka

 

Peanut Butter, a little seahorse, and Jellyfish were best friends who loved to explore the ocean and all its treasures together. Unfortunately, their adventures always seemed to take them past Crabby, “who would taunt as they slipped by, ‘You guys swim like humans.’” Jellyfish and Peanut Butter tried to ignore him, pretending they didn’t hear his hurtful jibes, but “Crabby was relentless. ‘You guys smell like rotten barnacles! Pee-yew!’” He compared them unflatteringly to sea slugs and his grandmother’s “run-walk shoes,” and ended with “what a bunch of bubbleheads!”

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Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Jellyfish bravely stood up to Crabby, saying, “‘driftwood and sea stones may break our bones, but names will never hurt us.’” Of course, Crabby had a retort to that which involved the fact that Jellyfish was an invertebrate. One day, as Peanut Butter and Jellyfish passed Crabby’s house on their way to the big reef, they steeled themselves for the insults to come. But all they heard was quiet – until the sounds of sobbing reached their ears.

They swam on and found Crabby trapped in a lobster pot that was being pulled to the surface of the water. He called out to them that he was scared. Jellyfish and Peanut Butter looked at each other. Was it their responsibility to help Crabby? Peanut Butter thought that his situation looked pretty serious. And Jellyfish agreed. He even had a plan.

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Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

The two friends swam up to the lobster trap, and Peanut Butter wrapped his tail around a slat in the door. When he pulled it open, however, Crabby didn’t move. Peanut Butter wanted him to hurry, but Crabby had a confession to make. He couldn’t swim, and he was afraid of heights. Now, Jellyfish had an idea.

He swam to the top of the lobster trap and with all his tentacles working feverishly, he tried to untie the knot in the rope. The trap was coming closer and closer to the fisherman’s boat. Just in the nick of time, the knot loosened, but then Crabby was hurtling to the bottom of the ocean. Peanut Butter and Jellyfish raced to catch it. “They grabbed ahold and lowered it to safety.”

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Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Crabby felt weak as he returned to his rock, but he stuttered out a thank you to Jellyfish and Peanut Butter. Then he told them that he was sorry for all the things he had said. “Crabby may have been afraid of heights, but he was brave enough to apologize.” Crabby admitted that he may have felt jealous of all the fun Peanut Butter and Jellyfish had “exploring the open waters.” Jellyfish told Crabby that there was “plenty to explore close to the ocean floor” too. In fact, that’s where “they found their greatest treasure.”

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Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Jarrett J. Krosoczka’s seafaring friendship story for little ones uses humor and a generosity of spirit to teach kids a lesson about empathy. Readers may giggle over Crabby’s taunts, but they will also understand the hurt they cause Peanut Butter and Jellyfish. Following this, the kindness showed by Peanut Butter and Jellyfish toward Crabby when he is in trouble then comes as a powerfully surprising message on compassion. Crabby’s willingness to admit his fears, own up to his jealousy, and apologize, as well as the trio’s growing friendship, provides many thought-provoking topics for children to consider.

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Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Krosoczka’s illustrations of the undersea world give readers plenty of details to enjoy while adorable Peanut Butter and Jellyfish take center stage. When their sweet smiles give way to wary looks, kids will know trouble is on its way. Each scene during Crabby’s entrapment and escape provide gentle suspense while demonstrating the story’s themes of understanding and acceptance. As the three explore a chest overflowing with gold in the final spread, readers can debate what the “greatest treasure” is.

Ages 3 – 7

Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2014 | ISBN 978-0375870361

Discover more about Jarrett J. Krosoczka, his books, and his art on his website.

World Jellyfish Day Activity

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Jellyfish Coloring Page

 

Watching a jellyfish float on the ocean current can be mesmerizing! Grab your colored pencils, markers, or crayons—and maybe some glitter too—and enjoy this printable Jellyfish Coloring Page!

Picture Book Review