May 23 – National Turtle Day

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About the Holiday

Susan Tellem and Marshall Thompson, who founded American Tortoise Rescue in 1990, established World Turtle Day to raise awareness and respect for turtles and tortoises and to promote conservation to help them survive. Celebrations take many forms, from fun activities where participants dress as turtles to educational programs that teach about this fascinating creature and how people can help turtles in danger. To learn more about World Turtle Day and American Tortoise Rescue – and to meet some of their adorable residents – visit worldturtleday.org.

Turtle and Tortoise Are Not Friends

Written by Mike Reiss | Illustrated by Ashley Spires

 

Upon beginning the story, children learn that “far, far away” two eggs shared the same pen at a zoo. Eventually, the eggs hatched: first a turtle and then a tortoise. The two babies took to each other right away, excited about all the fun they would have together. “People will call us the terrible Turtle Twins!” the little turtle says. But the tortoise is not receptive to this idea and launches into a mirror-image description about the differences between a turtle, a “horrid beast” and a tortoise who is a “handsome creature.” Following this, they go their separate ways to separate parts of the pen.

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Image copyright Ashley Spires, 2019, text copyright Mike Reiss, 2019. Courtesy of Harper Collins.

Soon, the zookeeper, leading a school field trip, stops by and during his spiel reveals that turtles and tortoises can live 100 years. The little turtle and tortoise are surprised and impressed by this information, but they go on with their individual lives – for 14 years. The turtle finds – and eats – a worm that “looked just like Winston Churchill.” The tortoise was picked up by one eagle and returned by another. They endured nature’s worst weather and saw old years go and new years come. They could have commiserated and celebrated together, but they didn’t.

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Image copyright Ashley Spires, 2019, text copyright Mike Reiss, 2019. Courtesy of Harper Collins.

Then one day, a red ball came bouncing into their pen. Both the turtle and the tortoise rushed to catch it. “The turtle got there first…seven years later.” Once he had it, he wasn’t sure what it was or what to do with it. At last, he climbed on top of it and felt like “the king of the zoo” until he rolled off and landed on his back. Seeing an opportunity, the tortoise hurried over. Two years later he reached the ball. Passing the struggling turtle, he gave a snide laugh and claimed it for himself, with predictable results. 

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Image copyright Ashley Spires, 2019, text copyright Mike Reiss, 2019. Courtesy of Harper Collins.

Both the turtle and the tortoise spent the days and months and years on their backs, staring up at the sky and at each other. Time passed – a lot of time. Eventually, a new zookeeper guiding a new group of children related some new information that changed the whole Turtle-Tortoise dynamic. The tortoise suddenly had an idea on how they might regain their footing, and not so suddenly the turtle agreed to try it. Managing it took some time – a lot of time – but they finally found themselves face-to-face again, and, with a different attitude and appreciation for their new “fast” friendship, they wandered off to enjoy some lettuce leaves together.

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Image copyright Ashley Spires, 2019, text copyright Mike Reiss, 2019. Courtesy of Harper Collins.

Funny, thought-provoking, purposeful, and poignant, Mike Reiss’s story is at once an entertaining tale of two stubborn creatures wasting decades of a could-be friendship and a gentle prompting to really look at the senseless prejudice, lack of communication, and missed opportunities that keep our human race divided. A careful reading of the tortoise’s comparison of a turtle and a tortoise provides a humorous yet serious jumping off point for discussions about prejudice as well as the effect of not questioning such pronouncements. Reiss even cleverly inserts a nod to scientific advancements and other societal changes that if embraced can lead to better understanding, friendship, and community. His early introduction of a turtle’s life span likewise frames the story in human terms. As the years pass by in the blink of an eye (or three or four words), Reiss encourages readers to count up how many years it takes the tortoise and turtle to become friends and ponder how that might relate to their own lives.

How far, far away is this unnamed zoo? Taking a good look at Ashley Spire’s ingenious cityscape, kids will discover that, no matter where they live, it is closer than they might think. Spires goes on to make the turtle and the tortoise distinct individuals but with many similarities, an idea that adults may want to explore with children while reading the book together. The turtle and the tortoise are adorable, and kids will be rooting for them to put aside their misconceptions and become friends. The passage of time is charmingly represented by the clothing and demeanor of the two groups of children that visit the zoo.

Turtle and Tortoise Are Not Friends is an enchanting and multilayered story that kids will want to hear again and again for its humor and thoughtful treatment of friendship. 

Ages 4 – 8

HarperCollins, 2019 | ISBN 978-0060740313

You can connect with Mike Reiss on Twitter.

To learn more about Ashley Spires, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Turtle Day Activity

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Follow the Turtles! Game

 

You can make this fun game from recycled materials and a little creativity! When you’re finished making the turtle shells, have fun guessing where the marble, bead or bean is hiding!

Supplies

  • Cardboard egg carton
  • Green tissue paper in different hues
  • Green construction or craft paper
  • A marble, bead, or bean
  • Glue
  • Scissors

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Directions

  1. Cut the egg carton apart into individual cups. You will need 3 cups for each game made.
  2. Cut the rims of the cups so they sit flat on a table.
  3. If the cups have open sides, fit two cups inside one another to fill the gaps
  4. Cut the tissue paper into small shapes
  5. Brush glue on a cup (I used a paper towel to apply glue)
  6. Cover the egg cup with pieces of tissue paper. Repeat with other cups.
  7. Let dry
  8. Cut a head and feet from the green craft paper
  9. Tape or glue the edges of head and feet to the inside of the cups
  10. Add a face to the head

To play the game:

  1. Line up the cups on a table
  2. Put a bead, bean, or marble under one of the cups
  3. Show the other player which cup the object is under
  4. Quickly move the cups around each other several times
  5. Ask the other player which cup they think the object is under
  6. Take turns playing

Extra Game: Make three more and play turtle tic-tac-toe! 

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You can find Turtle and Tortoise Are Not Friends at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 3 – Celebrating National Lumpy Rug Day with Author Sophia Gholz

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bug-on-the-rug-coverAbout the Holiday

Today’s holiday, in addition to having a humorous and whimsical bent to it, promotes some thoughtful consideration of two rug-related ideas. The onset of spring often inspires people to do some deep cleaning around the house, and that, according to the holiday, should include rugs – that cushy decor that can define a room or provide an impromptu place for pets to nap. As they age, though, rugs and carpets can develop lumps and bulges that compromise the safety and appearance of your home or office. If that’s the case at your house, a steam clean, day in the sun, or re-rolling may restore your rug to its original beauty. But National Lumpy Rug day isn’t all about outward appearance. The holiday also touches on that common practice of “brushing things under the rug” and encourages people to air any complaints, feelings, or topics that they have been avoiding. Making a full sweep of any problems underfoot is a great way to start the spring season, and sharing today’s book with your kids is a hilarious way to celebrate.

Hi Sophia! I’m thrilled to have you visit to talk about your latest book, Bug on the Rug, its endearing characters, inspirational message, and how the story changed from its initial idea. I also love your tips on how adults can use your book to foster discussion and awareness of those misunderstandings that can adversely affect friendships.

Sophia Gholz - headshot

Sophia Gholz is an award-winning children’s book author, magic seeker and avid reader. Sophia enjoys writing fiction with humor and heart. When writing nonfiction, she pulls on her love of science and her strong family background in ecology. When she’s not writing, you can find Sophia reading a book, visiting schools or exploring the great outdoors with her family.

Sophia’s debut book, The Boy Who Grew a Forest: The True Story of Jadav Payeng, was a NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Book, a Florida State Book Award Gold Medalist, Eureka! Nonfiction Honor Book and a 2020 Green Earth Honor Book. She is also the author of Jack Horner, Dinosaur Hunter! You can connect with Sophia on her Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Bug on the Rug

Written by Sophia Gholz | Illustrated by Susan Batori

 

Picture books are entire worlds and stories wrapped in a few hundred words. They share a mood, a lesson, a hug, a friend, a culture, an adventure. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again now: picture books are magic. That is why I am so excited to be here at one of my favorite blogs, Celebrate Picture Books, to share my newest book, Bug on the Rug. And today is the perfect day because it also happens to be National Lumpy Rug Day! Hooray! Did I mention that Bug on the Rug features a verrrry cozy rug? So cozy, in fact, it causes quite a stir.

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Image copyright Susan Batori, 2022, text copyright Sophia Gholz, 2022. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

In Bug on the Rug a rug-loving Pug and a rug-stealing Bug battle over a lone rug. These two over-the-top characters both believe they’re right and their claim to the rug takes priority. That is, until Slug comes along and helps open their eyes to the truth of each of their actions. Through empathy, both Pug and Bug learn to take ownership of their mistakes and discover that, in this case, forgiveness and friendship go hand-in-hand.

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Image copyright Susan Batori, 2022, text copyright Sophia Gholz, 2022. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

I began writing this book with the idea of creating a light story that everyone can have fun with. But as I wrote and these characters took on a life of their own, the story grew. At first glance, Bug on the Rug is silly and filled with word play. But truthfully, this is a friendship book that we can all relate to. Sharing is hard. Making new friends is harder. And admitting to our mistakes? Oof. That is the hardest. But we all make mistakes. It’s natural and if we allow it, we can grow from those mistakes. So, with that in mind and remembering it’s National Lumpy Rug Day, let’s take a moment today to pull out what we may have swept under the rug. Let it go. Shake it out. Smooth out those lumps and enjoy a fresh start!

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Image copyright Susan Batori, 2022, text copyright Sophia Gholz, 2022. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Thanks, Sophia! I really laughed my way through Bug on the Rug and cheered at the end for these three new friends. I love your rollicking storytelling and know kids and adults will too!

For all you readers out there, Bug on the Rug is a hilarious rhyming romp with a rhythm made for dramatic readings that kids will want to hear again and again. The book will make a favorite addition to home, school, and public libraries for lively and meaningful story times. 

Ages 4 – 7

Sleeping Bear Press, 2022 | ISBN 978-1534111479

Susan Batori - Headshot

Susan Batori’s books include Don’t Call Me Fuzzybutt and
Letters from Space. She worked in advertising before switching to
children’s book illustration. Susan lives in Budapest, Hungary. To learn more about Susan Batori, her books, and her art, you can view a portfolio of her work here and connect with her on Bēhance | Instagram | Twitter

National Lumpy Rug Day Activity

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Bug on the Rug-themed Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Activities 

 

  1. Use Bug on the Rug to start discussions on empathy and growth. Pull up a rug and ask readers to recall instances in their life when they have made a mistake or when they thought they were right when they were wrong. You can ask questions like: How did that moment make you feel? and How did you change in that instance? Readers can also discuss different instances when putting themselves in the shoes of others – empathizing with others – helped them change their point of view in some way.
  2. Ask readers to take a look at Bug and Pug and list how the characters changed from the start of the book to the end. This can be used to start a discussion about how we grow and develop emotionally through challenging experiences.

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You can find Bug on the Rug at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

February 24 – Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day

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About the Holiday

All this week, we celebrate Engineers and Engineering! Founded by the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPA) in 1951, Engineering Week focuses on increasing an understanding of and interest in engineering and other technical careers to ensure a diverse and well-educated engineering workforce for the future. More than seventy engineering, education, and cultural societies and more than fifty corporations and government agencies cooperate to raise public awareness of engineers’ contributions to our quality of life. Throughout the week they work to foster a recognition in parents, teachers, and students of the importance of a technical education as well as a high level of math, science, and technology literacy. By reaching out to schools, businesses, and community organizations across the country, they hope to motivate young people to pursue engineering careers. For Introduce a Girl to Engineering, or Girl Day, educators, engineers, volunteers, and others demonstrate engineering activities, show girls how engineers change our world, and provide mentors to guide tomorrow’s engineers. To learn more about Engineering Week and today’s holiday in particular, visit the NSPA website.

Goldilocks and the Three Engineers

Written by Sue Fliess | Illustrated by Petros Bouloubasis

 

“In a tiny bungalow, / there lived a clever thinker. / Young Goldilocks invented things. She’d make and craft and tinker.” Goldilocks made lots of useful things, like machines to help you tie your shoes, to a self-zipping zipper to a hat outfitted with a flashlight, magnifying glass, and itty-bitty satellite dish to help you find the things you’ve lost. But one day, Goldilocks found that she had “inventor’s block,” so she decided to take a walk.

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Image copyright Petros Bouloubasis, 2021, text copyright Sue Fleiss, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

At the same time, the Bear family was out gathering nuts and berries for their pre-hibernation celebration. Baby Bear had a nifty contraption that knocked fruit and nuts into a basket with a tennis racquet. Papa Bear had an ingenious wheelbarrow with mechanical arms and hands that picked berries one by one and deposited them in the cart—but only after tossing them through a tiny basketball hoop. Swish! And Mama Bear’s handy vacuum sucked fruit right off the bushes and collected them in a tank.

Their next stop was the beehive at the top of a hill. After they’d eaten all their goodies, Baby Bear spied a little bungalow. The Bears thought it was just the place to spend the winter. When they went inside, they found “the room was full of strange devices, / widgets, tools, and more!” Looking more closely, Papa Bear found a chair that was perfect for Baby Bear. He marveled that “it feeds you and it wipes your mouth, / and reads you stories, too!” Meanwhile, Mama Bear had discovered a bowl that stirred porridge and a bed that automatically rocked you to sleep.

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Image copyright Petros Bouloubasis, 2021, text copyright Sue Fleiss, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Baby Bear loved the chair but wished for one more innovation that would make it just right. Papa Bear found parts and tools and fixed the chair to Baby Bear’s specifications. Mama Bear tasted the porridge and found it lacking one ingredient, so Papa Bear created a porridge-stirrer accessory to add it drop by drop. By now it was dark, and even though Papa Bear thought it wasn’t right to stay, Baby Bear convinced him that one night would be okay.

But when they crawled into bed and turned it on, it rocked so much that it tipped the Bears right onto the floor. There was only one thing to do: “Baby fixed the engine block. / Replace the gears that burned. / Soon the bears were fast asleep… / Then Goldilocks returned.” She saw the chair, tasted the porridge, and then… “heard snoring sounds.” Wide awake now, the bears began to explain. But Goldilocks was not upset. Instead she said, “‘You’ve improved my projects here, / and made them much more fun. / Proving that four brains, by far, / are better than just one!’”

Excited to be inventing again with the bears on board to lend their smart innovations, Goldilocks sends the family off amid promises to “‘…meet up in the spring’” when they will “‘…make the next big thing!’”

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Image copyright Petros Bouloubasis, 2021, text copyright Sue Fleiss, 2021. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

With her fun flip on the Goldilocks story, Sue Fleiss invites kids to indulge their inner inventor with wacky contraptions that can make getting dressed, cooking, going to bed, and chores more exciting. Fleiss’s clever takes on the well-known “just right” chair, porridge, and bed get readers thinking creatively—perhaps even about their own household appliances. While the original story ends with the interloper being chased away, Fleiss’s version shines with the benefits of cooperation, collaboration, and being open to new ideas.

With so many cool inventions to discover on every page, readers will love taking extra time to find and talk about them all. Any young maker would swoon over Petros Bouloubasis’s well-stocked workbench, and readers would have a blast drawing their own gadgets using the tools and supplies depicted. Quirky, abstract landscapes add to the kid-centric ambiance, and just like the Bear family, who drives away in a new vehicle with their full wheelbarrow in tow, readers will look forward to returning to Goldilocks’ little bungalow again and again.

Imagination, creativity, teamwork, and friendship all wrapped up in a clever fractured fairytale—what could be better?! Goldilocks and the Three Engineers is one to add to home, classroom, and public library bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Albert Whitman & Company, 2021 | ISBN 978-0807529973

Discover more about Sue Fleiss and her books on her website.

To learn more about Petros Bouloubasis, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day Activity

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Build a Remarkable Recycled Bridge

 

Engineers are at the core of so many things that make our homes and neighborhoods what they are. Kids will have fun building a bridge from Using items you already have at home or that may even be slated for the recycle bin, kids will have fun making the bridge above and maybe even a whole town! Spaghetti boxes make great roadways, and cut-up egg cartons can be used as supports. Cereal boxes and pasta boxes make skyscrapers, apartment buildings, fire stations, and more. Need a farm silo? Grab a peanut butter jar, aluminum can, or bread crumb container. You can use them as is or—if your kids are sticklers for a little more detail—turn the boxes inside out, tape, and add paint and details! So look around, use your imagination, and get creative!

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You can find Goldilocks and the Three Engineers at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 14 – Valentine’s Day

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About the Holiday

Hearts are full on Valentine’s Day as we share our love for family, friends, and special sweethearts. This centuries-old holiday continues to grow as people engage in traditional and new ways to express their feelings. But what about the other 364 days of the year? Well, of course, love – in all its wonderful forms – is in the air on those days too as today’s book so charmingly reveals.  

Love Is for Roaring

Written by Mike Kerr | Illustrated by Renata Liwska

 

One day at school, the teacher gave her class an impossible assignment – at least for Lion. With their tables full of paper, paint, markers, crayons, scissors, and tape, the students were supposed to “show your Love.” “‘For whom? For what? and WHY?’ roared Lion.” He threw a tiny tantrum. “‘I don’t like pink and I don’t like hearts. I won’t do it!'”

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Image copyright Renata Liwska, 2022, text copyright Mike Kerr, 2022. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Books for Children.

Mouse wanted to help and told Lion there must be something that he loved. But Lion protested, saying that while love was fine for some, he did not “‘love love.'” He didn’t like hugs or kisses or sweets. Mouse thought and thought and then decided there might be another way to think about love.

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Image copyright Renata Liwska, 2022, text copyright Mike Kerr, 2022. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Books for Children.

Mouse asked Lion if he didn’t love “‘running and playing.'” Mouse also seemed to remember that Lion loved dozing – especially during class movie times. “‘And growling, and roaring…You don’t love that?'” Mouse prodded. And how about playing together? Lion thought it over, and while hugs, kisses, and sugary sweets weren’t his thing, he knew that playing and chasing and catching were. And there was one more thing that Lion realized he loved – his friendship with Mouse. So he happily worked at the table to make a special card with a pink heart on the front just for Mouse. 

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Image copyright Renata Liwska, 2022, text copyright Mike Kerr, 2022. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Books for Children.

Mike Kerr’s gentle story embraces children who may squirm at expressions of love that include hugs, kisses, or other showy displays of affection while reminding readers that love also can be revealed in favorite activities and moments shared with others. Mouse’s thoughtful response to Lion’s initial refusal to participate in craft time demonstrates empathetic friendship and alternate thinking that will resonate with kids. Honest dialogue between Lion and Mouse gives readers language to discuss their own feelings about love and other emotions as well as about how they like to express them. As Lion comes to see that he does love many things, he realizes that friendship is intrinsic to all of them and is a powerful kind of love in itself – a kind of love that he wants to share.

Kids will be captivated by Renata Liwska’s adorable and humorous illustrations. As Lion questions the assignment to show your love, his classmates look on with expressions of shock, sympathy, and confusion while a tiny inchworm makes a run for the door. Lion’s tantrum is more cute than cranky, and  Mouse, wanting to help, nearly becomes part of Lion’s stress snacking and moves a safe distance away to talk about the situation. Images of Lion participating in the rambunctious activities he likes best are joyful, and the final illustrations of Lion, now excited to share his love for Mouse, are heartwarming.

A sweet story of friendship as well as a meaningful way for adults and kids to talk about emotions and expressing their feelings, Love Is for Roaring will become a quick favorite on home bookshelves and is a must for school and public library collections. 

Ages 4 – 8

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2022 | ISBN 978-1681191249

Discover more about Mike Kerr and Renata Liwska, their books and their art on their website.

Valentine’s Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-entangled-hearts-matching-puzzle

Entangled Hearts Matching Puzzle

 

These friends are collecting valentines! Can you help them follow the paths to find more in this printable puzzle?

Entangled Hearts Matching Puzzle

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-love-is-for-roaring-cover

You can find Love Is for Roaring at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 4 – Get Ready for Valentine’s Day

About the Holiday

Love is in the air! Love for family, friends, and our special valentines. Begun as a religious feast day, Valentine’s Day became a day of romance with the bloom of courtly love during the 14th century. In England during the 18th century, those in love began showing their affections by giving flowers and candy and making valentine’s cards. Now, Valentine’s Day is one of the biggest holidays on the calendar and a favorite of adults and kids alike. 

Love, Violet

Written by Charlotte Sullivan Wild | Illustrated by Charlene Chua

 

Out of all the kids in her class, Violet thought only one “raced like the wind. Only one had a leaping laugh. Only one made [her] heart skip. Mira.” Every day, Violet dreamed of “astounding Mira with heroic feats,” of “bringing her treasures” and of all the adventures and fun they could have playing pirates, astronauts, knight and princess, and more. But whenever Mira asked her to play or wondered what she was drawing, Violet became shy and ran away.

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Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2022, text copyright Charlotte Sullivan Wild, 2022. Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers.

But on the day before Valentine’s Day, Violet had an idea. She made a glittery valentine for Mira and signed it “Love, Violet.” She dreamed that this might be the start of their adventures together. Before leaving for school, Violet tucked the valentine under her lucky white cowgirl hat. On the way, she heard other kids teasing each other about their valentines, and when Carlos asked Violet if she’d made someone a special card, Violet blushed and ran off, holding tightly to her hat.

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Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2022, text copyright Charlotte Sullivan Wild, 2022. Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers.

Suddenly, Mira raced up to her and complimented her on her hat. “Snow sparkled on Mira’s eyelashes. Mira was magnificent.” Violet thought her valentine was not nearly good enough. With her heart pounding “like a hundred galloping horses,” Violet dashed away. All during class she worried whether she could actually give Mira the valentine and if Mira would want it anyway. Mostly, she worried that they’d never have their adventures.

When it was finally time to exchange valentines, Violet gave out all of her cards – except one. Standing next to the coat rack, Violet slowly began to lift her hat. But all at once, Mira appeared, causing Violet to jump, crash into Mira, and fall to the ground amid a pile of coats and scarves. The other kids laughed. Instead of apologizing and handing Mira her card as she wanted to, Violet rushed away again.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-love-violet-snow-angel

Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2022, text copyright Charlotte Sullivan Wild, 2022. Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers.

Alone at recess, Violet lay on the ground and made a snow angel. She’d never be able to face Mira now. Just then, however, she heard “a laugh like leaping horses,” and she jumped up. She realized that only one person had “praised her hat…hadn’t laughed when she fell…had ever asked her to play horses.” It struck her that maybe “Mira wanted to be her valentine.” Violet ran to find Mira, but on her way a gust of wind picked up her hat and her valentine. The glittery heart landed right in where kids were playing.

When Mira heard Violet’s anguished cry, she ran over to see what was wrong. Violet showed her the ruined valentine she had made for her. Mira thought it was still beautiful, and she “tucked a torn bit into her cap.” Then Mira took a locket out of her pocket and gave it to Violet. When she opened it, Violet found a small heart on one side and a purple violet on the other. “‘Want to go on an adventure?’ asked Violet. ‘Yes!’ cried Mira.” And hand-in-hand they ran off – together.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-love-violet-together

Image copyright Charlene Chua, 2022, text copyright Charlotte Sullivan Wild, 2022. Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers.

Charlotte Sullivan Wild’s emotion-filled story of a girl-girl crush sweetly and realistically portrays the heart-pounding and nerve-wracking feelings of first love. As Violet tries to pluck up the courage to give Mira her valentine, kids will be rooting for her as events and her own fears threaten to derail her dreams of adventuring with Mira. Clues along the way hint at Mira’s reciprocating feelings, but the final exchange of valentines will melt readers’ hearts. Wild’s evocative vocabulary, beautiful phrasing, and natural dialogue make the story a rich read aloud, and her depiction of the adventures Violet dreams of as well as Mira’s concerned and hopeful attention to Violet create a warm and universal friendship story as well.

Charlene Chua reveals all of the hopes, dreams, and angst that go into Violet’s valentine for Mira in her lovely and poignant illustrations. Snapshots of the adventures Violet longs to have with Mira are drawn with the excitement and vivid imagination kids bring to the games they play. As Violet creates her valentine, readers can see how much work and thought she puts into it as paper, glitter, and other supplies lay strewn around her. This portrayal accentuates the disappointment Violet feels when her card meets its fate under the stampeding kids as well as Mira’s delighted reaction upon receiving it. Throughout the story, Chua invites kids to experience and empathize with Violet’s rollercoaster of emotions and mishaps on the way to discovering that Mira has been thinking about Violet too.

A joy-filled story of a crush between two queer girls and their courage to express their feelings to and for each other, Love, Violet is a moving, age-appropriate way to celebrate love on Valentine’s Day or any day you’d like to share your heart. Love, Violet is also a reassuring and affirming invitation for all children to discuss their own feelings with parents or other caregivers. The book is highly recommended for home bookshelves and is a must for school and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 8 (and up)

Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers, 2022 | ISBN 978-0374313722

Discover more about Charlotte Sullivan Wild and her books on her website.

To learn more about Charlene Chua, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Love, Violet Video and Author Story Time 

Author Charlotte Sullivan Wild, illustrator Charlene Chua, and a few other kidlit authors chipped in to make this video about Love, Violet, first crushes, and queer childhood that’s a perfect resource for educators and parents. Start out with listening to Charlotte Sullivan Wild read Love, Violet!

Get Ready for Valentine’s Day Activities

Valentine Activity Sheets

 

Have fun with these printable Valentine’s Day activities!

Share Your Heart! Valentine | Funny Valentine! | Love, Violet Coloring Page

You can find Love, Violet at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

January 18 – World Day of the Snowman

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About the Holiday

Today we celebrate snowmen, those winter sculptures that roll to a stop on front lawns, welcome customers to friendly business, and enjoy a day or two (or more if the weather cooperates) in parks and town greens wherever snow falls. Why today? Because the clever founder of the holiday looked at the 18 and decided it looked enough like the rounded body of a snowman and requisite handle of a broomstick to honor our winter friends. Speaking of friends, did you know that tomorrow is one of the three times during the year that we celebrate New Friends Day? The other two dates are October 19 and July 19! If you’re looking for a story to share for both World Day of the Snowman and New Friends Day, you’ll want to pick up today’s book!

Making a Friend

Written by Tammi Sauer | Illustrated by Alison Friend

 

“Beaver was good at making lots of things.” He could build, he could knit, and he knew a bit about engineering. But he was not so good at making friends. He tried hard to do nice things, but something always seemed to go wrong. Then, one day, the snowflakes falling from the sky gave Beaver an idea. “Hmm! Maybe this is what I need to make a friend,” he thought.

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Image copyright Alison Friend, 2018, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2018. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

He began rolling a huge snowball. While he was working, Raccoon came by to watch. When Beaver told him that he was making a friend, Raccoon said that it “takes two to make a friend.” Beaver was a bit disappointed until Raccoon did some math and showed him that Raccoon plus Beaver made two.

Working together Beaver and Raccoon made a cute snow friend. They added eyes, a nose, a smile, and two stick arms. But something was still missing. Raccoon said that thing was “pizzazz.” So they added a hat, a boa, some socks, and even a swim mask until their friend looked just right. But their friend just stared back at them. “This friend was not much of a friend at all. In fact, he seemed rather cold.”

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Image copyright Alison Friend, 2018, text copyright Tammi Sauer, 2018. Courtesy of HarperCollins.

Then Beaver and Raccoon looked at each other. They talked about what fun they’d had building the snow friend together. And they realized that they had become friends. Now they make lots of things to share, but they agree—“the best thing they made was a friend.”

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Image copyright Alison Friend, 2018, courtesy of HarperCollins

Tammi Sauer unlocks the secret to friendship in her clever story in which making a friend leads to making a true friend. While Beaver tries to extend the hand of friendship and do nice things for others in the forest, his efforts miss the mark. But when he meets Raccoon, their personalities, talents, and ideas of fun click and they build a real friendship. Young readers will understand Beaver’s feelings of disappointment and confusion when his overtures of friendship are not reciprocated and see that collaborating with someone—either in play or toward a common goal—often brings friends together naturally.

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Image copyright Alison Friend, 2018, courtesy of HarperCollins.

Little readers will fall in love with Alison Friend’s adorable Beaver who’s so good at creating a playhouse complete with water slide but has trouble making friends. Cheerful and enthusiastic, Beaver is a sweetheart as he begins rolling the snow into a ball. When Raccoon comes by, Beaver quickly shares the fun. Kids will enjoy seeing and learn from the images of companionship and give-and-take as Beaver learns a little math and a new word from Raccoon and Raccoon discovers that he likes the raisons Beaver offers him on their way to creating their snowman.  Full of color, smiles, and endearing moments, Friend’s pages are sure to delight kids.

Making a Friend is a charming read aloud, a celebration of creativity, and a gentle lesson on friendship all rolled into one. To share with children learning to navigate new friendships and those who love doing everything with their best buddy, the book makes a sweet addition to home, classroom, and public library bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

HarperCollins, 2018 | ISBN 978-0062278937

Discover more about Tammi Sauer and her books on her website.

You can connect with Alison Friend on Instagram.

World Day of the Snowman Activity

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Snow Buddies

 

This is a great craft for kids to share with a friend. Grab a pair of socks and have fun making these snow buddies! 

Supplies

  • White dress ankle socks
  • Polyester Fiber Fill
  • Tiny buttons
  • Fleece or ribbon, enough for a little scarf
  • Toothpicks
  • Twigs
  • Orange craft paint
  • Cardboard
  • White rubber bands, one or two depending on the size of the snowman
  • Fabric or craft glue
  • Small hair band (optional)

Directions

To Make the Snowman

  1. Cut a circle from the cardboard about 2 inches in diameter for the base
  2. Place the cardboard circle in the bottom of the sock
  3. Fill the sock with fiber fill about ¾ full or to where the ribbed ankle cuff begins. Pack tightly while making a sausage shape. You can make your snowman different shapes with the amount of fill you use.
  4. Stretch out the cuff of the sock and tie it off near the top of the fill either with a loop knot or with the hairband.
  5. Fold the cuff down around the top of the filled sock to make the hat.
  6. Wrap a rubber band around the middle of the sock to make a two-snowball snowman. For a three-snowball snowman, use two rubber bands. Adjust the rubber bands to make the “snowballs” different sizes.

To Make the Scarf

  1. Cut a strip of fleece or ribbon 8 to 10 inches long by ½ inch wide
  2. Tie the fleece or ribbon around the neck of the snowman
  3. To Make the Nose
  4. Dip one end of the toothpick into orange paint, let dry
  5. Cut the toothpick in half
  6. Stick the toothpick into the head or top portion of the snowman

To Make the Arms

  1. Insert small twigs into each side of the body of the snowman
  2. You can also use wire or cardboard to make the arms
  3. Attach two mini-buttons to the face for eyes with the fabric or craft glue
  4. Display your Snow Buddy

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You can find Making a Friend at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

January 11 – National Shop for Travel Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday encourages people to look ahead and plan for their next vacation or quick get-away. Whether you’re thinking of visiting a warmer area for some beach time or colder climate for skiing and sledding, meeting up with friends or family for a fun weekend, or dreaming of an overseas adventure, you can start looking into transportation, accommodations, and the attractions you’d like to visit today. And while you wait for a better time to make the trip, you and your kids can do some armchair traveling through books – like today’s humorous story about new experiences and new friends made.

Thanks to Two Lions and Blue Slip Media for sending me a copy of Tabitha and Fritz Trade Places for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own. 

Tabitha and Fritz Trade Places

Written by Katie Frawley | Illustrated by Laurie Stansfield

 

Scrolling through his phone in his rain forest abode, Fritz comes upon an ad that seems to be the answer to his wanderlust and need to escape the constant attentions of his herd. The ad from Tabitha, a self-described “pampered suburban cat” on Lair-BNB.com promises “First-class comfort! Five-star service! Fancy, frilly fun!” Fritz thinks it sounds perfect for a well-deserved birthday getaway. He answers the ad, and Tabitha responds right away. She can’t wait to exchange her pad for a “rain forest adventure” and tells Fritz to keep in touch.

The two pack up and take flights to their vacation destinations. Fritz sends a message to Tabitha that he was well received by one little human in particular and enjoyed splashing in the big watering hole. He also includes a warning about Rocky the snake who “does not play well with others.” For her part, Tabitha is relishing her time in the forest with Fritz’s herd. She’s even met some big cat family members, has discovered a bee hive makes a swell scratching post, found a perfect swatting toy hanging from a tree, and loves the outdoor litter box with its holes and mounds already dug. She also knows just the human Fritz has met and warns him about Claudia’s penchant for playing beauty parlor.

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Image copyright Laurie Stansfield, 2021, text copyright Katie Frawley, 2021. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Fritz and Tabatha’s next messages gush about the local cuisine. Tabitha is gorging on mice salad, mice hors d’oeuvres, and mice pizza while Fritz’s herd looks on in horror, and Fritz is cooking up a storm with Claudia in Tabatha’s kitchen. But the next day brings confusion and disappointment when a trip to the museum with Claudia and a dust bath go awry for Fritz, and Tabitha has a run-in with a hippo and finally meets the dreaded Rocky. She does remember, however, to wish Fritz a happy birthday and hopes he enjoys the party Claudia is preparing.

Disappointment turned to disaster, Fritz tells Tabitha, when there was a mix-up in whose birthday they were celebrating. He fondly remembers the birthday surprise his herd gave him last year. He signs off “Singing the blues, Fritz.” Tabitha too is feeling out of her depth and wishes she was back home with Claudia.

Fritz gets the message loud and clear and is all-in on getting back to familiar and beloved  territory. They pack up, make travel plans, and with a hug from Claudia for Fritz and a squeeze from the littlest member of the herd for Tabitha they hit the airport. Contentedly back at home, Fritz and Tabitha keep in touch—happy to have made a friend. In fact, these two like-minded travelers have sent each other thank-you gifts, and Tabitha even floats the idea of taking a trip together!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-tabitha-and-fritz-trade-places-party

Image copyright Laurie Stansfield, 2021, text copyright Katie Frawley, 2021. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Katie Frawley’s clever travelogue—told entirely through phone messages exchanged by Fritz and Tabitha on Lair-bnb—will delight kids. As Fritz and Tabitha regale each other with their adventures, kids will find plenty to giggle about as the shine of the new and exciting gives way to a renewed appreciation of home. Mix-ups and misunderstandings lead to laughs as well as sympathy for these sweet, out-of-their-elements characters. Puns sprinkled throughout the text add to the lighthearted fun, and the story is neatly packed with themes of friendships made and nurtured.

Laurie Stansfield matches irresistibly cute and funny illustrations to Frawley’s text while adding enticing details that will keep kids lingering over the pages with each new reading. As Fritz and Tabitha write about their days, Stansfield’s vibrant images depict the humorous reality of their misinterpretations. Interspersed wordless two-page spreads juxtapose similar situations experienced by Tabitha and Fritz , such as eating, meeting a hippopotamus, and sleeping arrangements.

Although both travelers are happy to cut their trips short, the goodbye scenes demonstrate that despite some rocky moments, both Fritz and Tabitha have made good friends on the other side of the world. A late airport scene of a busy terminal in which both Fritz and Tabitha appear among the many animal travelers can be a fun jumping off point to talk about when and how this “almost meeting” occurred as well as about airports and travel in general.

Original, charming, and packed with lots of laughs and feeling, Tabitha and Fritz Trade Places will become a favorite summer (and anytime) read. The fast-paced, multi-layered story and clever illustrations make this a perfect story time read for home, classrooms, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 8

Two Lions, 2021 | ISBN 978-1542008549

Katie Frawley grew up on a diet of Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle and Madeline. She went on to earn a bachelor’s in English from the University of Florida and a master’s in literature from Florida Atlantic University. These days, Katie lives in South Florida with her husband, four children, and a handsome mutt named Nantucket. When she’s not reading or writing, Katie can be found building pillow forts, testing recipes with her teensy sous-chefs, or shooing iguanas from her garden. You can connect with Katie on her website | Instagram | Twitter

Laurie Stansfield grew up in Oxford, England, but packed her bags and moved west to study illustration at the University of the West of England. She now works as a freelance illustrator. She is the illustrator of Poems Out Loud!, published by Penguin UK, and has more books forthcoming. Laurie lives with her husband in Bristol, United Kingdom. You can connect with Laurie on her website | Instagram | Twitter

One Question with Katie Frawley

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I’m excited to do a one-question interview with Katie Frawley about her debut picture book that’s sure to become a favorite whenever kids want to take a flight of fancy!

What is a favorite summer memory from your childhood?

Every summer from the age of about 8 to 18, I rode my bicycle across the state of Iowa with my family, some great friends, and about 10,000 other people. This event is called RAGBRAI, and it is an absolute hoot! The people are wonderful, the food is fantastic, and the memories definitely last a lifetime. I’m sure both Tabitha AND Fritz would enjoy the ride. Perhaps they should lace up their biking shoes and hit the road!

What an amazing experience! A biking tour sounds like a perfect trip for Fritz and Tabitha’s first adventure together! I wish you and Laurie Stansfield all the best with your book and definitely hope to see more about their friendship.

National Shop for Travel Day Activity

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Suitcase Tumble Matching Puzzle

 

These suitcases are well-traveled! Can you find the matching luggage in this printable puzzle?

Suitcase Tumble Matching Puzzle

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You can find Tabitha and Fritz Trade Places at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review