March 23 – Celebrating the Book Birthday of I Miss Your Sunny Smile and Interview with Deb Adamson

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-miss-your-sunny-smile-cover

About the Holiday

It’s National Reading Month, the perfect time to celebrate a book birthday! Today I’m excited to be featuring a sweet board book for the littlest readers that parents and caregivers will love sharing to make every day better. 

Thanks to Blue Manatee Press for sharing a digital copy of I Miss Your Sunny Smile for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own. I’m happy to be partnering with Deb Adamson in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

I Miss Your Sunny Smile

Written by Deb Adamson | Illustrated by Anne Zimanski

 

On a rainy day a mom sits with her son watching out the window. The little boy is sad, and Mom is trying to cheer him up. She suggests going in search of his smile. They head to the living room and Mom makes a game of it—and even their dog joins in. “Did it roll under the sofa? / Is it with marbles in the dark? / Do you think your smile will make a show / if we wag our tails and bark?”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-miss-your-sunny-smile-chair

Image copyright Anne Zimanski, 2021, text copyright Deb Adamson, 2021. Courtesy of Blue Manatee Press.

They look in the cookie jar and play dress up, but still the little boy wears a frown. Maybe dancing or playing peek-a-boo will help him find his smile. Even while he’s playing, though, something else is on his mind. He and his mom continue the search. At the boy’s bedroom door, they spy two fuzzy ears peeking out of the blanket. “Wait!” says Mom. “Is that your smile napping? / All cozy in your bed?”

They tiptoe in and lift the covers. There is Teddy—and the boy’s smile. The little boy hugs his teddy bear and grins from ear to ear. Outside the rain has stopped and the sun has come out. The boy, Teddy, and Mom take a walk to the park, ready to enjoy their day.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-miss-your-sunny-smile-park

Image copyright Anne Zimanski, 2021, text copyright Deb Adamson, 2021. Courtesy of Blue Manatee Press.

All little ones have moments when things aren’t going right or they feel afraid or worried. Deb Adamson’s sweet story lets parents and caregivers show their little ones that feeling sad can be temporary and that adults are there to help them by talking about what’s bothering them or trying to find out in other ways. When children aren’t old enough or don’t know how to express their feelings yet, playing with them, having a snack, or just spending time together can lead to happiness. Kids will be charmed by Adamson’s tender rhyming storytelling that reveals a loving mother and son bond and will be reassured when the boy finds his teddy bear—and his smile.

Anne Zimanski’s lovely illustrations show a mother fully engaged with helping her son feel happy again. Children will love her detailed images of home that create a cozy atmosphere as well as the enthusiastic dog that joins in on the search, snack time, and playtime. The characters’ facial expressions clearly show the mother’s love and patience and the little boy’s sadness, discontent, and worry. When the teddy bear is found, the boy’s smile is infectious. This scene is made even more endearing as Teddy’s floppy arms wrap around the boy as he hugs his favorite friend.

An enchanting story for families to share during those times when a little encouragement and understanding are needed as well as for quiet story times full of love and reassurance.

Ages Baby – 4

Blue Manatee Press, 2021 | ISBN 978-1936669875

Discover more about Deb Adamson and her books on her website.

To learn more about Anne Zimanski, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Deb Adamson

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Deb-Adamson-headshot

Deb Adamson’s children’s books can be silly, sweet and sometimes even a little bit quirky. Her goal is to always bring on a sunny smile! She lives in Connecticut with her husband, son, and orange cat extraordinaire, Lumpy.

You can connect with Deb Adamson on her website | Facebook | Twitter 

Hi Deb! It’s wonderful to be talking with you about your latest book! You’ve had such a varied career in all types of communications jobs—from being a broadcast news journalist and syndicated columnist to working as a public relations spokesperson for a major aquarium to becoming a published picture book author. Do you feel like your previous jobs have led you to writing for children? What do you like most about this genre?

I do feel that my previous careers have influenced my children’s books. As a writer, I feel like everything we do colors our work. And the varied career I’ve had definitely shows up in my  books. Writing can be such a magical pursuit. We draw from all aspects of experience. The subconscious is tapped and what we didn’t even know was a focus or deep impression makes an appearance on the page. I love the saying, “What a boring world it would be if we were all the same.” That goes for writing. I guess for me, once a journalist, always a journalist because  a few of my story ideas came from news stories that sparked an interest. And animals, whether marine or not, seem to more often than not, make a cameo in most of my books. I have to add though, that even through all those careers, I was reading children’s books and writing and querying children’s manuscripts. My first book was published while I was working at the Aquarium. Even before I had my son, there was something about writing for children that called to me. So, this has actually been my preferred career choice for many years now. I consider myself really lucky to finally call this my current vocation!

Have you always loved to write? Who were you influenced by while growing up?

I’ve always loved to read and to write. I was most influenced by my mother. She was a voracious reader. She wrote herself and believed in the power of story. Even though I was barely six years old, I still have vivid memories of the newest branch of our city library opening a half mile from my house. I recall frequently skipping along the sidewalk with her to that library and carrying home stacks of books. Such happy memories.

What inspired you to write I Miss Your Sunny Smile? Can you tell readers a little about your process in writing it?

I am big believer at cultivating emotional intelligence. (I have a shelf lined with self-improvement books!) As adults we come to learn that bad days come and go. So, we focus on what is good in our lives and hopefully are able to put most things in perspective. Little ones have yet to acquire those skills, therefore it is up to us to model a healthy approach. This little book is my attempt at helping parents guide young children ages one through four, through a bad day. The mom in the book is attempting to lighten the situation with distraction and humor, which is a great tool for redirecting feelings in young children. It is my hope that parents will remember the message of distraction and recall it whenever they need it. Even though it has been over 16 years, I certainly remember needing a book like this when my own son was a toddler!

Anne Zaminski’s warm illustrations show such a sweet relationship between the mother and her child. What were your first thoughts when you saw them? Do you have a favorite spread?

I cannot gush enough about Anne Zimanski’s art for this book! The illustrations are somewhat retro. The color is vivid. The emotion she captured is spot-on. We picture book authors are lucky to be paired with such talent. Anne really brought the characters to life, just as I had imagined. I could not be more pleased. If I had to pick a favorite spread it’s the one where the mom, child, and dog are looking under the sofa barking and wagging tails searching for a smile! I imagine that one generating giggles.

Your Twitter followers have been introduced to your cat whom you affectionately call Fatty Lumpkin, or Lumpy for short. Can you tell us a little about him?

Lumpy, like most author cats, is my constant companion.He is usually somewhere in the room, contentedly snoozing, just glad to have me nearby.  And yes! He has been my muse. I was not always a cat person. I grew up with dogs and just never knew a cat until as a young adult. I moved away and decided to adopt one. Then I learned about cats’ many charms. I actually wrote a manuscript inspired by that fact, that many people label themselves one or the other—cat or dog person, but usually not both. That’s often because they just don’t take the time to familiarize themselves with the great differences in cat and dog behavior. The manuscript is  super silly! My agent and I are hoping that one finds a home.

What’s the best part about being a children’s writer?

The best part of being a children’s book writer is losing myself in story and then ultimately sharing what I cultivated with children and families. I think most writers enjoy finding some universal truth that will ultimately reach out and touch the reader. And when that reader is a child it takes on that much more meaning and pleasure. But of course, not all children’s book writing has to have such depth. Like I said, books for kids should also just be written to encourage the pure pleasure of reading. I really enjoy knowing that my books generate laughs!

What’s up next for you?

I have three children’s books coming out in 2021 and one in 2022. I cannot even believe that, myself! I Miss Your Sunny Smile board book in March, Bing Bang Pling, Now We Swing, a picture book this summer, and A Christmas Eve Wish For Santa, a picture book in the fall. Needless to say, I will be especially busy with marketing. And then in 2022, Scott Joplin’s Maple Leaf Rag, a nonfiction picture book is next.

Thanks, Deb! It’s been great chatting with you! I wish you all the best with I Miss Your Sunny Smile and all of your upcoming books!

I Miss Your Sunny Smile Giveaway

I’m happy to be partnering with Deb Adamson in a giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of I Miss Your Sunny Smile written by Deb Adamson | Illustrated by Anne Zimanski

Here’s how to enter:

This giveaway is open from March 23 through March 30 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on March 31

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | Prizing provided by Deb Adamson.

If you would like a signed copy of I Miss Your Sunny Smile, you can order from Bank Square Books.

I Miss Your Sunny Smile Activity

celebrate-picture-book-picture-book-teddy-bear-coloring-page

Teddy Bear Coloring Page

 

Enjoy some teddy bear love with this printable coloring page!

Teddy Bear Coloring Page

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-miss-your-sunny-smile-cover

You can also find I Miss Your Sunny Smile at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 23 – International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-madeline-finn-and-the-therapy-dog-cover

About the Holiday

People have holidays celebrating their favorite treats—like Popcorn Day, Cherry Pie Day, and Chocolate Chip Cookie Day—so dogs should have a food holiday of their own, right? Well, today is it! Today we remember that our best furry friends like to be rewarded with a special treat or just shown a little extra love with a tasty morsel. Before anyone thought about what dogs ate, dog “treats” included some pretty awful stuff—moldy bread and rotten leftovers included—but an American manufacturer named James Spratt was struck by an idea when he saw stray, hungry dogs gobbling up ship’s biscuits on one of his travels in Liverpool, England in the 1800s. While in London, he created the first dog biscuit, which was soft and made of fresh ingredients like meat and vegetables. The first commercial dog biscuit was developed in 1908 by the F. H. Bennett Biscuit Co. It was hard and made with meat products, milk, and important minerals.

Madeline Finn and the Therapy Dog

By Lisa Papp

 

Madeline gives her dog, Star, a hug at his first birthday party. While they have cake, Madeline’s mom asks if Star is ready for his test the next day. Madeline assures her he is because they have been practicing meeting people, like the postman, “sitting still when a bike goes by,” and even “meeting other dogs.” Madeline tells Star that he’s “going to make the best therapy dog ever.” The next day Madeline takes Star to the Walker Oaks Retirement Village, where he’ll meet three people. Mrs. Dimple greets them with her therapy dog, Bonnie, who helped Madeline when she was learning to read.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-madeline-finn-and-the-therapy-dog-practicing

Copyright Lisa Papp, 2020, courtesy of Peachtree Publishing.

Inside, Mr. Finch tells Madeline that he’ll be grading Star on his visits. First, Mr. Finch watches Star walk around the room, stop, and begin walking again on command. Even when Star sees other therapy dogs, he doesn’t stop to play. “Next, Mr. Finch pets Star, especially touching his ears and tail. Star doesn’t mind.” Star also sits still when a wheelchair rolls by. Finally, Star is supposed to stay where he is when Madeline and her mom walk away, but instead he walks across the room to a woman in a wheelchair and lays his paw on her knee. Mr. Finch writes something down, but he is smiling.

For Star’s next test, he’s taken into a room with a group of people. While Madeline is nervous, Star “walks right up and smiles.” One woman calls Star sweet, a man kisses Star right on his nose because he reminds the man of a dog he had when he was young, and another woman tells Star about her garden and reads him a letter. “Everyone seems happy,” but there’s one man sitting alone near the window.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-madeline-finn-and-the-therapy-dog-first-test

Copyright Lisa Papp, 2020, courtesy of Peachtree Publishing

A nurse introduces him as Mr. Humphrey, and Madeline asks him if he’d like to pet Star. Mr. Humphrey says nothing. Mr. Finch writes something down. Then Madeline, her mom, and Star leave. Madeline’s mom says that Star did well on his second test, but Madeline wonders about Mr. Humphrey. “‘Some people need time,’ Mom says” and reminds Madeline of how patient Bonnie was with her. At home, Madeline thinks about things that Mr. Humphrey might like. That night, Madeline practiced reading with Star before bedtime.

The next time they visit Walker Oaks, they have to ride the elevator. At first Star doesn’t want to get in, but Bonnie nudges him and they walk in. When they get out, they see that someone has dropped a plate of cookies, but Star doesn’t react. Mr. Finch takes notes. When they see Mr. Humphrey, Madeline approaches him and introduces Star and asks if he’d like to pet him, but he stays silent. A little later Madeline asks if he’d like to look at her magic cards, but he still says nothing. Then Mrs. Dimple called her over and talked to her.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-madeline-finn-and-the-therapy-dog-mr-finch

Copyright Lisa Papp, 2020, courtesy of Peachtree Publishing

 Afterward, Madeline thought that maybe Mr. Humphrey wasn’t ready to smile. She asked Mr. Finch if she and Star could see Mr. Humphrey again. This time, Madeline sat in a chair next to Mr. Humphrey with Star close by. In a little while, she took a book from her bag and whispers to Mr. Humphrey that she didn’t always like to read. Seeing Madeline with a book, Bonnie loped over and sat next to Star. Madeline began to softly read her book out loud.

Near the end of the story, Madeline saw Star move close to Mr. Humphrey and rest his chin on his knee. Mr. Humphrey put his hand on Star’s nose. Finally, Mr. Humphrey looked at Madeline. “‘My wife loved books,’” he said. “‘How about another story?’” While Madeline was choosing another book, Mr. Finch came over and handed her “a tag for Star. I AM A THERAPY DOG, it says.” Madeline “fastened his new tag onto his collar, right above his heart.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-madeline-finn-and-the-therapy-dog-mr-humphrey

Copyright Lisa Papp, 2020, courtesy of Peachtree Publishing

Lisa Papp’s immersive storytelling will delight children as they follow Madeline through her practice sessions with Star and see her grow in confidence as she visits the retirement home and devises her own solution to engaging Mr. Humphrey. Kids will empathize with Madeline’s kindness as well as her nervousness over Star’s performance and will cheer each time he does well. Young readers will be fascinated to learn about all of the practice and testing a dog undergoes to become a recognized therapy dog.

Papp’s beautiful pencil, watercolor, and digital illustrations, rendered in soft hues invite kids to Star’s first birthday party and into the Walker Oaks Retirement Village, where the surroundings, the residents, and the staff are depicted in sensitive and realistic scenes. Madeline’s thoughtfulness and consideration for Star and the residents—and especially her concern for Mr. Humphrey—are clearly visible and mirror the natural empathy of children. 

Infused with love, empathy, and heart, Madeline Finn and the Therapy Dog will charm readers as a stand-alone story or to spark additional research into therapy dogs and other animals. The book will quickly become a favorite read aloud and is highly recommended for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 8

Peachtree Publishing, 2020 | ISBN 978-1682631492

Discover more about Lisa Papp, her books, and her art on her website.

You can find an extensive Activity Kit to download on the Peachtree Publishing website.

International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day Activity

CPB - Dog Biscuits

Homemade Dog Biscuits

 

These homemade dog biscuits are fun to make and a special treat for your dog at home, a neighbor’s pet, or dogs waiting for forever homes at your local shelter. 

*Children should have adult supervision when using the oven.

Supplies

  • 1 large bowl
  • Large spoon or whisk
  • Cookie cutters – shaped like traditional dog bones or any favorite shape

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup powdered milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup water
  • 1/3 cup margarine or butter, melted
  • 1 egg beaten

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees
  2. Add buckwheat flour to bowl
  3. Add powdered milk to bowl
  4. Add salt to bowl
  5. Stir to mix dry ingredients
  6. Add water
  7. Add melted margarine or butter
  8. Add egg
  9. Stir until liquid is absorbed
  10. Knead for a few minutes to form a dough
  11. If the dough is too dry, add a little more water, one Tablespoon at a time
  12. Place the dough on a board
  13. Roll dough to ½ inch thickness
  14. Cut into shapes with cookie cutters
  15. Bake at 325 degrees for 35 minutes
  16. Biscuits will be hard when cool.

Makes about 40 biscuits.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-madeline-finn-and-the-therapy-dog-cover

You can find Madeline Finn and the Therapy Dog at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

December 25 – Christmas Day

CPB - I Got the Christmas Spirit Cover

About the Holiday

Christmas is anticipated all year round for the joy of giving, the fun of receiving, and the message of hope the holiday gives. There are as many ways to celebrate as there are families, but today’s book shows that the inspiration of the season can live in every person all year round.

Thanks to Bloomsbury Children’s Books for sending me a copy of I Got the Christmas Spirit for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

I Got the Christmas Spirit

Written by Connie Schofield-Morrison | Illustrated by Frank Morrison

 

A little girl wakes up with a smile on her face and “the spirit of the season” in her heart. As she and her mother head out into the snowy city, she hears “the spirit in the air” as carolers sing and a corner Santa rings a bell. She’s been saving her money to add to the familiar red pot and happily drops it in the slot. The choir is now singing “Deck the Halls,” and the little girl sings along with all her heart.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-Got-The-Christmas-Spirit-spirit-in-air

Image copyright Frank Morrison, 2018, text copyright Connie Schofield-Morrison, 2018. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Then it’s time for a yummy roasted treat to warm her up in the shivery air. On the ice-skating rink, the girl and her mom “swirled and twirled around the spirit” with other kids and adults enjoying some frozen fun. Afterward, a tour of the store windows decorated with lights and glitter makes her feel sparkly inside. But when they come upon a mother and her two children huddled against the wind with a “Help Please” sign, the girl says, “I felt the spirit deep down in my soul.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-Got-The-Christmas-Spirit-skating

Image copyright Frank Morrison, 2018, text copyright Connie Schofield-Morrison, 2018. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

In a crowded store nearby, the little girl looks wide-eyed at all the toys then whispers to a tired Santa her wish “for the spirit everywhere.” As she, her mom, Santa, and a host of other people leave the store carrying wrapped packages, they feel the spirit spread by the girl’s smile. Outside, the little girl and the other shoppers give the presents to the needy family. The little boy grins from ear to ear as his mom stands by happily and the baby rests in Santa’s arms.

The Christmas spirit is not just a thing or a place or a person, the girl understands, “The spirit is you!” Then the girl gets her own surprise when she spies her dad coming home. She runs to him and he lifts her into a hug. Here is what she wants for Christmas—“Peace for all, good tidings, and cheer—let’s live the spirit every day of the year.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-I-Got-The-Christmas-Spirit-coming-home

Image copyright Frank Morrison, 2018, text copyright Connie Schofield-Morrison, 2018. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

As the sights and sounds of Christmas begin to light up towns, stores, and homes, Connie Schofield-Morrison’s story fills young readers with the joy and deeper meaning of the holiday. Little ones wanting to share their bubbly excitement for Christmas as well as their innate empathy will fall in love with the little girl who eagerly joins in on all of the city’s festivities while also embracing those in need. Her big heart and buoyant spirit will inspire kids to find the spirit of the holiday in everything they do too. Kids are invited to join in reading with exuberant alliterative words like “Ding Dong Ding, that call out to the little girl

Readers can almost hear the bells and singers, feel the soft snow, and smell the roasting nuts as he takes readers on a tour of the city decked out for the holidays. In his gorgeous, realistic paintings, the emotions and actions of the little girl cheer young readers as they see her belting out a Christmas carol, gliding on ice rink, and walking side-by-side with Santa to deliver her surprise gifts to the needy family. Images of the girl dropping money that she has saved into the Salvation Army pot and frowning sadly as she comes upon the destitute woman and her family mirror the compassion many children feel for those less fortunate.

Like its predecessor I Got the Rhythm, I Got the Christmas Spirit is an uplifting and beautiful book to add to any child’s collection—not only at Christmas, but any time of the year. A top choice for public libraries too.

Ages 3 – 7

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1681195285

To learn more about Frank Morrison and view a gallery of his art, visit his website.

Christmas Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-santa's-sack-maze-puzzle

Santa’s Sack Maze

 

Santa has one more present to put into his sack. Can you help him take the gift through the maze in this printable puzzle?

Santa’s Sack Full of Presents Puzzle | Santa’s Sack Full of Presents Solution

CPB - I Got the Christmas Spirit Cover

You can find I Got the Christmas Spirit at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

December 8 – Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer Book Tour Stop

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-comet-the-unstoppable-reindeer-cover

About the Holiday

I was honored to host the cover reveal of Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer on March 11 and am thrilled to be part of Jim Benton’s book tour as this story about the beloved Comet is launched around the world, just in time for Christmas. This funny and poignant book will light up Christmas-season story times with joy and themes that will be remembered all year round.

Thanks goes to Two Lions and Blue Slip Media for sharing Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer with me for review consideration. All opinions about the book are my own. I’m also thrilled to be teaming up with them in a giveaway of the book. You can find details below.

Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer

By Jim Benton

 

“’Twas the Night Before Christmas….” We know how this one goes, right? Or do we? Let’s see…

“’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” (so far, so good) / “a tense situation.” / “The elves had worked the whole year / without a vacation.” (Oh, rein-deer!)

It seems all this work, work, work, had left the elves in bad moods, especially Stinky and Stanky who got into it over wrapping a present. Seeing that their argument might escalate, Comet hoofed in to break it up, only to be knocked out colder than a North Pole winter. While Comet’s intervention worked as he’d hoped, when he woke up, his arm didn’t. The doctor set Comet’s broken arm in a cast. When Comet jumped up to get back to work, though, the doc gave him the bad news: “‘No dashing, no dancing, / your arm, it needs fixin’. / It will be a long time / before you’re prancing with Vixen.’” Comet was sad to miss out on the big night, but he went down to the launch anyway,  only to see that his replacement was a “rookie named Freddy.” Although the other reindeer were skeptical about Freddie’s flying prowess, they took off into the sky as usual.

Finished for the night, the elves headed to their homes, leaving Comet in the workshop all alone. But what was THIS? There in the corner and reaching up to the ceiling was Santa’s bag of toys! Comet did what any conscientious reindeer would do: “he called Santa’s cell.” Getting no response, Comet knew Christmas was all up to him.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-comet-the-unstoppable-reindeer-toys-left

Copyright Jim Benton, 2020, courtesy of Two Lions.

Try as he might, though, Comet couldn’t lift that bag of toys. He was about to give up when he noticed a letter lying on the floor. He sat down with a mug of hot chocolate and a few plates of cookies and began to read. He was expecting the usual, but this letter was from a little boy asking for something for his sister. It said: “‘She’s too small to write, / but I know what she’d like: / a little green pig / on a little pink bike.’”

But the letter writer didn’t stop there. He added that he knew there were a lot of deserving kids in the world and told Santa it would be all right if he couldn’t bring his sister the pig, ending with “‘She won’t cry a bit. / She won’t even pout. / Just don’t wear yourself / or your poor reindeer out.’” By the time he’d finished reading, Comet had tears in his eyes. No one had ever considered the reindeer before. Comet looked up, up, up at that heavy, heavy bag and saw at the top… “that little green pig.” Comet thought about that bag and his broken arm, and then, with only one reservation, “he hefted that bag / like a brave little fighter. / ‘Would it kill kids to ask / for some toys that are lighter?’”

So Comet took to the sky, carrying that sackful of toys, and touched down in countries from East going West. His travels were fraught with mishaps aplenty. After losing a tooth and getting nearly run over, he flew “on to Egypt and Sweden, / Italy and France, / where he scraped up his butt / (‘cause he didn’t wear pants).” Trips to every city in the world, along with a few more painful encounters, brought Comet no closer to finding the yellow house with a blue roof where the boy and his sister lived.

Comet consulted his map once more and a single tear dropped onto a place he realized he’d missed. He reached the yellow house just as the sun was rising over the horizon and slipped down the chimney. There he was met by the little boy and his sister. Just as he was handing them their gifts, the “phone gave a jingle. / ‘I’ll get it,’ said Comet. / ‘I’ll bet it’s Kris Kringle.’” And it was with many thank-yous and “‘a vacation,’ said Santa. / ‘Can the elves have one too?’ / asked Comet, who knew that’s / the right thing to do.’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-comet-the-unstoppable-reindeer-chimney

Copyright Jim Benton, 2020, courtesy of Two Lions.

Laugh-out-loud funny and with a message about going above and beyond for family and friends, Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer will become a kid-favorite in any house for Christmas and throughout the year. Comet’s misadventures on his travels around the globe are slapstick gems kids will want to hear over and over. Adults will also find themselves “Ho-ho-hoing” at Jim Benton’s bouncy rhymes and funny wordplay as well as Comet’s hilarious thoughts that echo ones we’ve all had at one time or another. Amidst all the fun, too, is a heartfelt story about thinking of others, kindness, and the true meaning of giving that will impress and cheer kids.

Benton’s expressive, madcap cartoon illustrations will have kids giggling at the overworked elves wrapping presents with fatigued, bored expressions, the goofy reindeer (especially Freddy), and Comet’s valiant efforts to lift the enormous bag. Images of Comet’s accidents and near misses will be met with guffaws. Benton’s illustrations also show many examples of empathetic kindness, deep appreciation, and unstoppable perseverance that will resonate with kids beyond the holiday season.

Sure to be asked for again and again on its way to becoming a Christmas tradition, Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer would make a perfect pre-holiday gift for your own family or any child. The book will be a favorite addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 8

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542043472

Jim Benton Photo

Jim Benton is the award-winning creator of the New York Times bestselling series Dear Dumb Diary and Franny K. Stein as well as the popular It’s Happy Bunny brand. His books have sold more than fifteen million copies in twenty-five countries and have garnered numerous honors. Like Comet, Jim knows what it’s like to hobble around in a cast; however, he is still learning to fly. Find out more about him at www.jimbenton.com.

You can connect with Jim Benton on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer Giveaway

I’m pleased as Christmas punch to be teaming with Two Lions and Blue Slip Press in a giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer by Jim Benton

To enter:

  • Follow Celebrate Picture Books
  • Retweet a giveaway tweet
  • Bonus: Reply with your favorite reindeer for extra entry. Each reply earns you one extra entry

This giveaway is open from December 8 to December 13 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on December 14. 

Prizing provided by Two Lions and Blue Slip Media

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer Book Tour Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-reindeer-puzzle

Reindeer Teams Match-Up Puzzle

 

Match the two-member reindeer teams so they can help Santa in this printable puzzle!

Reindeer Teams Match-Up Puzzle

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-comet-the-unstoppable-reindeer-cover

You can find Comet the Unstoppable Reindeer at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

December 1 – National Day of Giving

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-little-moles-christmas-gift-cover

About the Holiday

Established in 2012, the National Day of Giving – also known as Giving Tuesday – is held on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving to celebrate generosity and giving to others. Commemorated around the world, the movement “unleashes the power of people and organizations to transform their communities and their world.” There are many ways to lend a hand and give back from donating money or goods to lending your voice in advocating for those in need to using your talents to make a difference. It’s hoped that this one day sparks a continued outpouring of giving throughout the year. the spirit of today’s holiday continues throughout the year. To learn more about how individuals or organizations can get involved in the US or globally, visit the Giving Tuesday website.

Little Mole’s Christmas Gift

Written by Glenys Nellist | Illustrated by Sally Garland

 

Little Mole was looking forward to Christmas like never before. Out in the woods he’d found “the biggest, the best, the most beautiful mushroom he had ever seen,” and he couldn’t wait to give it to Mama. He put on his warm clothes and boots and headed into the forest to pick it. As he pulled it along behind him, he imagined Mama’s surprise and delight when she saw it.

But as he was dragging it home, he heard someone crying. Curled up in the brambles was Little Squirrel. When Little Mole asked what was wrong, Little Squirrel said she hadn’t eaten all day. Little Mole thought that breaking a piece off the stem would still leave a nice gift for Mama while satisfying his friend. Little Squirrel was so thankful as she nibbled on her meal.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-little-moles-christmas-gift-Little-Squirrel

Image copyright Sally Garland, 2020, text copyright Glenys Nellist, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Little Mole hoisted the mushroom onto his shoulder and went on his way. Soon he heard whimpering, and as he came closer he saw Little Mouse in distress. Little Weasel had taken his pillow and Little Mouse couldn’t get to sleep. There was still plenty of stem left, Little Mole decided, so he cut off a piece. Little Mouse laid down and under a blanket of leaves Little Mole pulled up, he fell asleep.

Little Mole was just about home when he ran into Little Chipmunk who was worried about getting caught in the coming winter storm without an umbrella. Little Mole knew his mushroom “would make a perfect umbrella. But if he gave it away, he wouldn’t have a big gift for Mama anymore.” He couldn’t decide what to do. Just then it started sleeting. Little Mole wasted no time. He snapped off the stem and gave the top to Little Chipmunk. “‘Thanks, Little Mole. You are so kind!’ Little Chipmunk said as she took shelter under the mushroom.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-little-moles-christmas-gift-Little-Chipmunk

Image copyright Sally Garland, 2020, text copyright Glenys Nellist, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Little Mole wrapped up his gift for Mama. It was just a bit of stem, not the big gift he had envisioned. But when Mama opened it, she was delighted. It was just the thing to make a delicious soup for their Christmas dinner. Little Mole didn’t seem convinced, though. He told Mama that the mushroom used to be much larger, but that he had given “most of it away to friends who needed it.”

When she heard that, Mama gave her son a big hug and told him that his “‘kindness [was] the biggest, most perfect Christmas gift I have ever received.’” Little Mole smiled. Christmas had turned out just as he had hoped.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-little-moles-christmas-gift-best-gift

Image copyright Sally Garland, 2020, text copyright Glenys Nellist, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

With an endearing protagonist, Glenys Nellist’s story about the true meaning of giving from the heart will appeal to little ones’ natural sense of generosity while strengthening the joy they feel in helping out at home or helping those in need. The three friends Little Mole encounters give children an opportunity to talk about what they would do in each situation and for adults to discuss ideas of kindness as well as gratitude as this one gift becomes many. Mama’s reaction to Little Mole’s gift will show kids that it’s not the size of a present that counts but the love and thought that goes into it. They’ll also see that a person’s actions, compassion, and consideration for others are gifts that cannot be matched.

Sally Garland’s textured illustrations focus on adorable Little Mole and his dreams of the perfect Christmas, allowing the youngest readers to fully appreciate Little Mole’s decisions to give up parts of the present for Mama that means so much to him. As Little Mole encounters Little Squirrel, Little Mouse, and Little Chipmunk, readers can clearly see the sadness and need of each of these friends as well as the positive difference Little Mole’s kindness makes in their day. Garland’s lovely aqua sky swirled with white snow and gauzy wind makes for a shivery winter scene, while Little Mole’s home is cozy and warm with a glittering Christmas tree and homemade treats and decorations.

A charming companion to Little Mole Finds Hope, Little Mole’s Christmas Gift makes for cozy story times that will inspire love, compassion, and kindness at Christmas and throughout the year. The book would be a favorite addition to home, school, and public library bookshelves.

Ages 3 – 6

Beaming Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1506448756

Discover more about Glenys Nellist and her books on her website.

You can connect with Sally Garland on Instagram.

National Day of Giving Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-little-moles-christmas-gift-coloring-page

Little Mole’s Christmas Gift Activity Kit

 

Have fun with Little Mole and the six pages of puzzles and coloring pages in this Activity Kit available for download and printing from Beaming Books. 

Little Mole’s Christmas Gift Activity Kit

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-little-moles-christmas-gift-cover

You can find Little Mole’s Christmas Gift at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 29 – It’s National Book Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-animals-would-not-sleep-cover

About the Holiday

For readers every month is National Book Month, but October is especially set aside to highlight books and the love of reading. Fall is a book bonanza as publishers release new books in all categories and the holiday gift-giving season beckons. Books, of course, make superb gifts for all ages! So whether you’re looking for a new or new-to-you book to read right now, or new titles to give to all the family and friends who will be on your list, this month is a perfect time to check out your local bookstore to see what wonderful books are on the shelves! This month is also a perfect time to discover books that get kids excited about math and science in a whole new way – like today’s book!

Thank you to Charlesbridge for sending me a copy of  The Animals Would Not Sleep! for review consideration. All opinions about the books are my own.

The Animals Would Not Sleep!

Written by Sara Levine | Illustrated by Marta Álvarez Miguéns

 

All of Marco’s stuffed “animals were making a ruckus” when his mom told him it was time to get cleaned up and ready for bed. She wanted to see all the toys put away, so Marco, who thought like a scientist, got to work. He wanted to sort his animals like a scientist would, so he got out three baskets and made signs for Flying Animals, Swimming Animals, and Animals That Move on Land. Then he picked up his dancing flamingo, bird, bat, and ladybug and put them in the first basket. He placed his octopus, stingray, frog, fish, whale, and seal in the second basket, and his dinosaur, giraffe, bears, snake, pangolin, gecko, mice, and zebra in the third basket.

But the animals were still wide awake, and “they egged one another on until not one remained in its container.” Marco thought they would settle down, but when his mom called the second time, he reconsidered his strategy. This time he made signs that sorted the animals by color, but zebra started to cry. He was afraid being in such close quarters with snake and stingray, plus he missed his friend giraffe.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-animals-would-not-sleep-ruckus

Image copyright Marta Álvarez Miguéns, 2020, text copyright Sara Levine, 2020. Courtesy of Charlesbridge.

Marco decided to try again. He took all of his animals out and made signs that read Small, Medium, and Large. Things seemed quiet and Marco began to put on his pajamas. But then he heard some kind of moaning or groaning coming from the Large basket. When he went to check, Dinosaur and Dancing Flamingo complained about being too cramped. Plus, Dancing Flamingo missed Rainbow Bear. Then he heard noises from the Small basket. Those animals weren’t happy either.

Marco’s mom gave him two minutes to get it all sorted out. Fortunately for Marco, “being a scientist, he was used to coming up with ideas and thinking outside the box.” The animals were getting tired and Yellow Bear had just burst into tears for no apparent reason. Like a good scientist, Marco cared about his animals and wanted them to be happy. He had one more sorting idea. With the large animals, medium-sized animals, and small animals all tucked in with plenty of room, friends nearby, and cozy warmth on Marco’s bed, Marco got under the covers and got a goodnight kiss from Mom. Then they all fell happily to sleep.

Back matter includes an illustrated Author’s Note about the way scientists sort, or classify, animals by characteristics and a discussion that explores the math in the story as well as Try This! tips for adults to engage children in sorting by Karen Economopoulos, co-director of the Investigations Center for Curriculum and Professional Development at TERC.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-animals-would-not-sleep-marco

Image copyright Marta Álvarez Miguéns, 2020, text copyright Sara Levine, 2020. Courtesy of Charlesbridge.

Perfectly capturing the way young children interact with their toys, Sara Levine combines imagination and scientific thinking in her inventive story, part of the Storytelling Math series from Charlesbridge. In Marco, who’s proud of his scientific thinking, Levine shows readers that they too already have this ability. Marco’s empathy for his animals’ when they are unhappy will engage children in thinking, along with Marco, about classification and the various ways the animals can be sorted, getting them excited about how math is used every day. Levine’s use of realistic dialogue that echoes bedtime routines in many homes and gives each character—human and animal—distinct personalities will draw kids in to this charming story that is organically infused with strong math lessons. Levine gives Marco a sweet final solution to his problem that will please kids and have them wanting to think like a scientist too.

Marta Álvarez Miguéns opens the story with an enchantingly wild two-page spread of Marco standing in the middle of his room as his toys bounce on the bed, climb blocks, juggle, fly, and cause a ruckus. Turn the page and, as Mom peeks into the room, these animals now lie motionless around the room. When Marco sorts his animals into the baskets, readers can clearly see which animals go where and why. Kids will knowingly giggle when the just-sorted animals spring from their resting places to prolong bedtime. Miguéns also plainly depicts Marco’s and the animals’ facial expressions from happy and playful to sad and crying to peaceful and satisfied. These images give adults and children an opportunity to discuss emotions and how to recognize various clues in faces, a skill important for social-emotional learning. Vivid colors, adorable animals, details such as alphabet blocks that stack or are turned to spell words, and kid-appealing décor will have kids wanting to come back again and again.

A book that’s sure to become a favorite at bedtime or to enhance classroom or homeschooling curriculum, The Animals Would Not Sleep! will spark mathematical and scientific thinking and recognition in all young learners. The book offers an irresistible invitation to experiment and interact with math and science and is a must for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 6

Charlesbridge, 2020 | ISBN 978-1623541286 (Hardcover) | ISBN 978-1623541972 (Paperback) 

Discover more about Sara Levine and her books on her website.

To learn more about Marta Álvarez Miguéns, her books, and her art, visit her website.

About Storytelling Math

Storytelling Math offers books that celebrate children using math in their daily lives as they play, build, collaborate, compromise, and discover the world around them. Each story features characters of color who are empowered to solve problems, enjoy activities, and help out using their knowledge of and experimenting with math. Free downloadable hands-on activity kits are available for each book on the Charlesbridge website. Sharing these joyful stories with your littlest ones and older kids will make them eager to explore, use, and learn more about math every day. You can learn more about Storytelling Math on the Charlesbridge website

Storytelling Math: Math, Diversity, and the Power of Story was developed with Marlene Kliman at TERC—a nonprofit dedicated to STEM education—under a grant from the Heising-Simons Foundation.

Enjoy this The Animals Would Not Sleep! trailer with Author Sara Levine!

National Book Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-animals-would-not-sleep-activity-logo

The Animals Would Not Sleep! Activity Kit

 

You can have fun sorting and exploring math with your class or family with the Activity Kit for The Animals Would Not Sleep on the Charlesbridge website. Download it here!

The Animals Would Not Sleep Activity Kit

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-animals-would-not-sleep-cover

You can find The Animals Would Not Sleep! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

August 13 – Happiness Happens Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dewdrop-cover

About the Holiday

It’s all up to you to make his month-long holiday happen. It offers an opportunity for each person to ask: What makes me happy? During these last weeks of summer, be sure to include those things that truly bring you and your children joy. While many of the usual activities may not be available, finding new ways to use your talents or to help others can bring a new kind of happiness, as you’ll see in today’s book.

Dewdrop

by Katie O’Neill

Little Dewdrop, an adorable axototl, runs to join the line to sign up for the Sports Fair. He asks his friends if they’re going to go too. Mia, a turtle, says she’s entering the “pebble-throwing contest,” Newman the Newt tells Dewdrop that he’s going to be writing “a song to cheer everyone on, and three minnows are using their cooking talents to make the food. Dewdrop says he’s working on a cheerleading routine, but he wants to help everyone else too.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dewdrop-question

Copyright Katie O’Neill, 2020, courtesy of Oni Press.

When Mia wears herself out training, Dewdrop brings her healthy snacks. Then he joins in on the recorder while Newman composes his song, but he falls asleep before they finish. Next, Dewdrop is happy to supply ingredients for the minnows’ concoction. Everyone is busy building the tents and stands for the fair, while the participants train. Mia sweats it out lifting rocks, but then she sees Bear lifting a heavy barbell with one arm. She feels dejected and wonders if there’s even a point in competing.

Writing a song seemed easy to Newton, but now none of his tunes are coming out just right. The ground around him is littered with balled-up paper. The minnows are worried that the food they’re making is too boring and think maybe a new recipe would be better. Dewdrop, on the other hand, is leaping and dancing and shaking his pompoms. “WOW! I am so good at cheerleading!” he says to himself.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dewdrop-pebble-throwing

Copyright Katie O’Neill, 2020, courtesy of Oni Press.

The next day Dewdrop goes off to see if his friends need any help. He finds Mia struggling to lift a barbell as big as Bear’s. She manages to raise it over her head as Dewdrop applauds. Then he asks her to lift him the way she used to when they were younger. She does it easily, and Dewdrop is impressed by how much stronger she’s gotten. As Dewdrop runs off to find another friend, Mia realizes that Dewdrop is right and that she doesn’t need to compete against anyone but herself and should just “try to do better than [she] did yesterday.”

Dewdrop finds Newton down in the dumps. He still hasn’t written a song he likes. Dewdrop encourages him to relax and listen quietly to his inner voice. When he does, a beautiful tune bursts out. Next, Dewdrop follows his nose to where the minnows are trying yet another recipe, worried that no one will like what they make. Dewdrop has a solution to that. “I will bravely volunteer to lay my life on the line…and taste test for you,” he says. He dips his spoon into what one minnow calls “a boring old stew” and declares it…”probably the best thing I have ever tasted!” Cheered by this news, the minnows realize they can’t please everyone and go to work creating dishes that would make them happy.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dewdrop-cheerleader

Copyright Katie O’Neill, 2020, courtesy of Oni Press.

At last the day of the sports fair comes. The stage and playing fields are ready; the stands are packed, and the food court is open. Newton steps up to sing his song that he says expresses his feelings about the sports fair. The audience smiles and claps along. First up, it’s time for Mia to show her stuff at the pebble pitch. When she steps up to the line, Dewdrop performs his special cheerleading routine just for her. She throws…. The rock sails over the-much-bigger Bear, Tortoise, and Lobster’s heads. At the end of the competition, the judge presents her with a medal for “New Personal Best.”

At lunchtime everyone rushed to get in line at the minnows’ booth. When Dewdrop finally gets to the front, one minnow tells him that they made something special for him and that Mia and Newman are waiting for him to join their picnic. Dewdrop finds them in a field, and they present him with a basket to thank him for everything he’d done to remind them about “what’s important.” Dewdrop lifted the cover and discovered… a Worm Pie! Which made this “the best day ever.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dewdrop-music

Copyright Katie O’Neill, 2020, courtesy of Oni Press.

Everyone needs a little encouragement now and then and Katie O’Neill’s endearing axototl, Dewdrop, is just the one to deliver it. A natural cheerleader, he helps his friends and readers learn a simple, but most-important lesson about growing up and growing into your individual talents. As Dewdrop enthusiastically gives his friends a hand when they worry, strain, and struggle to become the very best at the fair, kids will see that comparing oneself to others and trying to please everyone is a losing proposition and actually stifles ones creativity and ability. When Mia, Newton, and the minnows succeed at the fair by being themselves, kids will understand that it’s only when they are true to themselves that they are really winners. O’Neill adds humorous touches throughout the story that will charm kids and fleshes out the characters’ personalities. Comics’ and graphic-novel-loving kids will be drawn to O’Neill’s candy-colored illustrations that prompt them to examine and empathize with the actions and emotions of excitement, disappointment, pride, and friendship depicted.

Fun and confidence-boosting, Dewdrop would make a thought-provoking addition to home, school, and public library collections. 

Ages 6 – 9

Oni Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1620106891

Discover more about Katie O’Neill and her books on her website.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dewdrop-cover

You can find Dewdrop at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million 

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review