March 30 – National Doctors’ Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday dates back to March 30, 1933 when Eudora Brown Almond of Winder, Georgia, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, wanted to honor physicians everywhere. To celebrate on that day, greeting cards of appreciation were sent and flowers placed on graves of former doctors. Today, the red carnation is recognized as the symbol for Doctors’ Day.

March 30th was chosen because it marked the first time—in 1842—that anesthesia was used during surgery. Dr. Crawford W. Long administered ether before operating, and afterward the patient declared that he neither felt nor remembered anything about the procedure. In 1991, President George Bush proclaimed Doctors’ Day to be a National observance. To celebrate, send your doctor a message thanking them for their care. You might also consider donating to a charitable medical organization that provides services around the world.

Dragons Get Colds Too

Written by Rebecca Roan | Illustrated by Charles Santoso

 

If you’ve adopted a dragon recently, you may have discovered that they get colds too. “However, caring for a sick dragon can be a daunting task.” Here are some tips on making your pet feel better. For dragons, paper tissues have more than a little flammability possibility, so they tend to prefer sleeves—your sleeves to be precise. Be sure, then, to always carry extra shirts.

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Image copyright Charles Santoso, 2019, text copyright Rebecca Roan, 2019. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Trying to give your dragon cold medicine? Being met with firmly clamped lips? “It’s best to have a full dance routine ready” to distract it. After you’ve gotten it to take its medicine, it’s time to feed a cold…or is it feed a fever? Either way, spicy hot food does the trick. Just be sure to wear protective gear for those “fiery sneezes” to come.

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Image copyright Charles Santoso, 2019, text copyright Rebecca Roan, 2019. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

After some entertainment, it’s time for your dragon to take a nap. What to do when it refuses? A special book-reading nook may be just the thing. And never disturb a dragon when it finally falls asleep—no matter where that is! Finally, your dragon will begin feeling better. But recovery time is important too. For dragons this doesn’t mean taking it easy, though. For music-loving dragons you may want to provide some tunes or instruments. And for yourself? Perhaps a pair of earplugs.

Soon—because of all your help—your dragon will be back to its old self again, and the two of you will be back to your adventures!

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Image copyright Charles Santoso, 2019, text copyright Rebecca Roan, 2019. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

In her guide to caring for a sick dragon, Rebecca Roan channels the concerns and comic turns that can often accompany treating a child with a cold. Providing steps, facts, and tips, Roan mirrors the creative thinking adults do to get kids to take medicine, rest, and eat a little something. Both adults and children will laugh as they recognize the symptoms of spending sick days at home.

Charles Santoso’s illustrations hilariously depict the discrepancy between a perfect patient who calmly takes the doctor’s advice and the reality at home. With an ooey-gooey runny nose, fiery sneezes, and a healthy dose of uproarious activity, the dragon is funny and endearing. When both the patient and the caregiver recover, readers will be charmed by their return to the fun they enjoy together.

Dragons Get Colds Too is an amusing and entertaining remedy for any day but especially for days when kids feel under the weather.

Ages 3 – 6

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1681190440

To learn more about Charles Santoso, his books, and his art on his website.

National Doctors’s Day Activity

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Snakes and Ladders Game

 

Playing a board game with a child is a good way to keep them occupied while they’re recovering! Here’s a printable Snakes and Ladders game for you to enjoy! 

Supplies

Directions

  1. Print the board game template
  2. Determine which player goes first by rolling the die. The player with the highest roll goes first.
  3. The first player rolls the die and moves along the game board, starting at square 1, the number of spaces indicated on the die.
  4. Other players take turns rolling the die and moving along the board.
  5. The first player to reach square 100 is the winner

Ladders: When a player lands on a space with the bottom of a ladder in it, the player moves up to the space at the top of the ladder and continues to play from there.

Snakes: When a player lands on a space with the head of a snake in it, the player slides down to the space with the snake’s tail in it and continues to play from there.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dragons-get-colds-too-cover

You can find Dragons Get Colds Too at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 3 – National Women Physicians Day

Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors by Tanya Lee Stone and Marjorie Priceman picture book review

About the Holiday

Today, we celebrate the birthday of Elizabeth Blackwell, who in 1849 became the first woman to earn a medical degree in the United States. Her courage in the face of much opposition paved the way for other women to pursue careers in the medical field. National Women Physicians Day also honors the achievements and contributions of all women physicians around the world. 

Who Says Women Can’t be Doctors? The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell

Written by Tanya Lee Stone | Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman

 

Once upon a time there were no women doctors. Women weren’t even allowed to be doctors. Sounds like a fairy tale, doesn’t it? But it was the truth. Then Elizabeth Blackwell, came along. Elizabeth was not like other girls of the 1830s. She loved to explore and take on challenges. She could lift her brother over her head, and to toughen herself up she slept on the hard wood floor. To get a better look at the world she once climbed to the roof of her house and leaned waaaaay out with a spyglass. What did she see? Maybe she saw her future. But it wasn’t what she imagined at the time. Blood made her queasy, dissection was disgusting, and being sick just made her want to hide from all the fussing.

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Image copyright Marjorie Priceman, 2013, text copyright Tanya Lee Stone, 2013. Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company.

A comment by a sick friend, however, puts a bee in Elizabeth’s bonnet. Mary Donaldson tells Elizabeth that she would much rather have been examined by a woman than her male doctor, and then says, “You should be a doctor, Elizabeth.” What a crazy notion, right? Well… Elizabeth can’t stop thinking about it. She asks around. Some people think it’s a good idea, but impossible; others simply think it’s impossible. They believe women aren’t strong enough or smart enough and they laugh at her. By this time, though, Elizabeth is determined.

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Image copyright Marjorie Priceman, 2013, text copyright Tanya Lee Stone, 2013. Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company.

She applies to 28 medical schools, and they all say, “No.” But one day a “Yes” arrives in the mail. Elizabeth packs her bags. As she nears the school, Elizabeth sees that the townspeople have all come out to see her. They aren’t there to welcome their new medical student, though; they just want to whisper and point and stare. Surely, Elizabeth thinks, her classmates will be happy to see her. 

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Image copyright Marjorie Priceman, 2013, text copyright Tanya Lee Stone, 2013. Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company.

But she receives the same reception on the college campus. In fact, she learns that the only reason she was accepted was because the men voted to let her in as a joke! Elizabeth knows how to handle it. She studies hard and gives her opinions, and soon she wins the respect of her fellow students—even if the townspeople still don’t accept her.

On January 23, 1849 Elizabeth Blackwell graduates from medical school with the highest grades in the class. She has become the first woman doctor in America! Many people hope that she will be the last. But as we know…she was Not!

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Image copyright Marjorie Priceman, 2013, text copyright Tanya Lee Stone, 2013. Courtesy of Henry Holt and Company.

Tanya Lee Stone magnificently imbues this short biography of Elizabeth Blackwell with enough mystery, conflict, and history for even the youngest readers to understand the type of girl and woman Elizabeth was as well as the challenges she faced. Stone has deftly included details of Blackwell’s life that  make her instantly recognizable and relatable to children. This biography is not only historical nonfiction, but a universal story for all generations. Blackwell may have started out as a reluctant dreamer, but once she dared to believe she accomplished more than she or anyone could have imagined. It is what we want for all our children.

Marjorie Priceman’s illustrations that swirl with words, are angled on the page, and float in white space are as topsy-turvy as the world Elizabeth Blackwell created with her courage and life’s work. Blackwell’s boldness is echoed in the rich colors and strong lines of Priceman’s gouache and India-ink paintings, and the emotions she stirred in others—from derision to horror to admiration—are cleverly and exceptionally drawn in a minimal style on the characters’ faces.

Ages 5 – 9

Henry Holt and Company, 2013 | ISBN 978-0805090482 (Hardcover) | ISNB 978-1250183392 (Paperback)

Learn more about Tanya Lee Stone and her work—both fiction and nonfiction—for children and teens on her website!

You can connect with Marjorie Priceman on Facebook!

National Women Physicians Day Activity

CPB - Doctors Clothespins

Doctor Clothespin Figures

 

Elizabeth Blackwell believed in herself and became the doctor she wanted to be. With this craft you can make a doctor figure or color your own clothes to make your figure any profession you are dreaming of!

Supplies

CPB - Doctors Clothespins on box

Directions

  1. Draw a face and hair on the clothespin
  2. Cut out the outfit you want your doctor to wear (color pants on your clothespin if you choose the lab coat)
  3. Wrap the coat or scrubs around the clothespin. The slit in the clothespin should be on the side.
  4. Tape the clothes together
  5. Wrap the cap around the head and tape it
  6. If you’d like to display your clothespin doctor on a wire, string, or the edge of a box or other container, cut along the dotted lines of the clothes template

Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors by Tanya Lee Stone and Marjorie Priceman picture book review

You can find Who Says Women Can’t be Doctors? at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review