June 21 – International Day of Yoga

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About the Holiday

The idea for an International Day of Yoga came from India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014 during a speech to the United Nations General Assembly. The proposal was met with enthusiastic support, and June 21—the Summer Solstice—was chosen as the official date. On the first International Day of Yoga in 2015, nearly 36,000 people from around the world, including world leaders, gathered in New Delhi and performed twenty-one asanas for thirty-five minutes. Since then the day has been celebrated across the globe. In 2018 more than 100,000 people participated. This year, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the theme of the holiday is “Yoga for Health – Yoga at Home.” With its emphasis on connecting the mind, body, and spirit, yoga provides an excellent way to exercise while relieving the stress of the day – something we can all use this year. To watch or participate in this year’s virtual event, visit the United Nation’s International Day of Yoga page.

Yoga Baby

Written by Amanda Flinn | Illustrated by Shane Crampton

 

Mom, sporting a pretty wild bedhead hairdo, wakes her baby, whose own rakish ‘do is topped with a small fountain tuft. In the living room, Mama, rolls out her yoga mat as a water bottle sits nearby. Her baby, sitting on her own blanket and ready with a sippy cup, claps her hands eagerly. The baby watches her mom and from her sitting position follows along as best she can: “Yoga mama, reach up high. / Yoga baby, touch the sky.”

When Yoga mama poses in Steady Tree, Baby gets up “on one knee.” For this enthusiastic baby, though, her mom’s yoga routine turns into a time for play, tickles, and giggles. After a hair yank during Mama’s push up plank and a bit of tumbling during her downward dog, however, Baby finishes up strong: “Yoga mama, shoulder stand. / Yoga baby, feet in hand.” Cool down is as sweet it gets as Baby’s eyes grow tired and she and Mom enjoy a snuggly nap.

An Author’s Note giving simple tips for practicing yoga with little ones follows the story.

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Image copyright Shane Crampton, 2020, text copyright Amanda Flinn, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Moms, dads, and kids—whether they do yoga or not (yet!)—will fall in love with this awe-dorable, pitch-perfect board book. In her charming rhyming couplets, Amanda Flinn captures the “me too!” baby-and-mom dynamic that makes doing activities with little ones so fun and educational. The baby’s attempts to copy her mama’s poses are clever and will have kids and adults laughing—and trying them—together. The cuddly ending will make this book a favorite for loving story times, nap times, bedtimes, or anytime.

Happiness shines from every page in Shane Crampton’s bright illustrations that reflect the enthusiasm and love between Mom and child through their shared gazes, eager smiles, and breaks in the routine for playtime. Crampton clearly depicts Mom’s yoga poses and her baby’s interpretations of them, adding to the humor. Small, homey details, like toys, a guitar, a laundry basket, and proudly displayed drawings by Baby, create a realistic home environment that gives adults and kids more familiar items to name and talk about. Little readers will also giggle at the family cat, who stretches and rolls and wants to join in the fun too.

Sure to be an often-asked-for read, moms, dads, caregivers, and especially kids will want Yoga Baby on their home bookshelves. It also makes an enchanting and mindful read for daycare, preschool, classroom, and public libraries. 

Ages Birth – 5

Beaming Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1506456997

Discover more about Amanda Flinn and her books on her website.

To learn more about Shane Crampton, her books, and her art, visit her website.

International Day of Yoga Activity

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Yoga Alphabet Coloring Pages

 

It’s fun to match yoga poses with letters of the alphabet! Grab your crayons and enjoy these yoga-inspired coloring pages then do the poses!

D is for Dog | I is for Inhale | K is for Kite | O is for Otter | W is for Waterfall

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You can find Yoga Baby at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

April 9 – International Unicorn Day COVER REVEAL of Unicorn Yoga

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About the Holiday

If you ask a child—maybe even an adult—to name a magical creature, chances are they’ll say, “a unicorn!” Unicorns have been part of legend since ancient times, undergoing changes from an image of fierceness and power to a representation of strength and true love to today’s more glittery superstar. To celebrate today, I’m thrilled to be hosting the cover reveal for a book about a very special—and nimble!—trio of unicorns that kids will fall in love with!

Unicorn Yoga

Written by Gina Cascone and Bryony Williams Sheppard | Illustrated by Jennifer Sattler

 

The healing, restorative power of yoga has been known for centuries, and more people than ever are active practitioners. Now even the youngest of readers can learn this mind and body exercise, helping them set up a lifetime of healthy habits. Through clear, easy-to-follow instructions, a unicorn yogi, along with two energetic students, leads children through a ten-pose class. Kid-friendly back matter provides additional information on yoga, as well as tips on mindfulness, encouraging readers to develop their own daily practice.

Children reap tremendous benefits from learning the mindfulness that yoga has to offer—from stress reduction to better concentration in school. The adorable unicorns in Unicorn Yoga make giggly and supportive companions for kids learning this health-boosting exercise.

Ages 5 – 7

Sleeping Bear Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1534111066

Unicorn Yoga will be released on July 15. The book is available for preorder with these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

I was delighted to talk with authors Gina Cascone and Bryony Williams Sheppard and illustrator Jennifer Sattler about Unicorn Yoga, their inspirations, the best part of writing for children, and so much more!

Meet Gina Cascone and Bryony Williams Sheppard

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Photograph by Cari Ellen Hermann

Gina Cascone is the author of 30 books in several different genres, and has written for screen and television. Around the World Right Now is her first picture book, a joyful collaboration with her daughter inspired by her granddaughter’s unrelenting curiosity. She lives with her husband in central New Jersey. They have two grown children, two grandchildren, and three cats.

Bryony Williams Sheppard holds a degree in Theater Education from Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts and a master’s degree in educational psychology. She has been teaching since the age of 17 and loves bringing different stories to life with her students. She is also a teacher near Princeton, New Jersey, where her favorite part of lesson planning is choosing the best book for each class. When not working, Bryony enjoys spending time in her noisy house with her husband, two children, two cats, and a dog.

Welcome, Gina and Bryony! I’m really happy to be talking with you about your book! Before we jump into questions about Unicorn Yoga, let’s let readers get to know you both a little better.

Gina, When did you become interested in being a children’s writer?

My first published book was actually a memoir, Pagan Babies and Other Catholic Memories, a humorous, child’s eye view of parochial education. Then I wrote fiction for adults, until an editor asked if I could write thrillers for teens. So, I did that for a while and enjoyed it very much. Until yet another editor asked for scary chiller stories for middle-grade readers. That was great fun and a great fit for me since Bree insists that I have the soul of an eight-year-old boy – which is probably why I am so happy and comfortable in the company of children.

You’re known for your middle-grade Deadtime Stories series and young adult thrillers.  What have you found to be the challenges and rewards of writing picture books?

For me, the greatest challenge of writing picture books is the economy of the medium.  To convey an idea that could fill many pages in just a few, well-chosen words to teach, entertain, and inspire is hard work. The reward is the great joy of being able to read an entire book in one sitting to the best audience in the world – children.

Bree, You have a degree in theater education as well as a Master’s degree in educational psychology and work as an elementary school teacher. How does your theater background influence your teaching style? Does it have an impact on your writing?

I often say that teaching preschool is a lot like being in theater. You always have to be on and ready to entertain your crowd because the moment you lose them, they turn on you! Many of the skills that you gain from being involved in theater can develop academic abilities and are general skills. Reading comprehension, public speaking, confidence, team building, creativity, and so much more, are developed through theater. I often use lessons and games I’ve learned in theater over the years in my class to help challenge my students both socially and academically.

Since your mom is a writer, have you also always been interested in writing?

Honestly, no.  It never really crossed my mind until she asked me – well, told me actually – to write Around the World Right Now with her. It was such a wonderful experience!

Thanks so much! It’s wonderful to see how in sync you two are and what fun you have together. Now I just have to ask: unicorns and yoga make an intriguing pair!  What was the spark for this adorable concept?

Because yoga provides so many benefits, it seems only logical to introduce the practice to children as early as possible.  So, we approached our editor with a picture book to do just that. She shared it with the wonderfully creative team at Sleeping Bear Press and came back to us with the idea that unicorns might encourage children to become engaged.

The concept was not as far-fetched as our editor feared we might find it. After all, both yogis and unicorns are joyful, playful, and magical. There is an even more concrete correlation. In the Indus River Valley, in India, five-thousand-year-old bronze seals have been found; some depicting yogis and some depicting unicorns.

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Unicorn Yoga is the second picture book, after Around the World Right Now (Sleeping Bear Press) that you’ve collaborated on. What inspired you to begin writing picture books?

When I first started writing children’s books, Bree was a child herself.  She was my perfect little creative consultant. When she’d come home from school, after we’d chatted about her day, I’d ask her to read what I’d written and tell me what she thought. Her feedback always pointed me in the right direction.

When Bree became a teacher, she was sometimes frustrated that she couldn’t find just the right book for her lessons. So, she decided that we should write picture books.

But it was Bree’s daughter, my Sydney Rose, who brought the idea to fruition. When Syd was about six years old, she became obsessed with time zones. “What time is it in China?” “What time is it in Italy?”  “What time is it … What time is it?” Her questions were driving Bree crazy. She told me that she was going to put up a big map covered with clocks set to the correct times so she wouldn’t have to keep doing the math to figure it out. Around the World Right Now is the result of three generations of girl brain power.

As a mother/daughter team, Gina, what’s the best part of working with Bree?

The laughter. We always find ourselves giggling about something. And learning and creating together gives a wonderful sense of continuity to my life.  Seeing my daughter as my equal and even my better is an incredibly rewarding experience.

Bree, what do you love best about working with your mom?

I have spent my life watching her write and create. Being a part of the process with her has been so much fun because I get to see her excitement over an idea take shape and grow.

Can you each talk a little about your process in writing Unicorn Yoga together? Gina, would you like to take the lead?

I have been practicing yoga for ten years, taking classes at least five times a week with truly amazing teachers who are very generous with their knowledge. So, we had a wealth of resources. Bree’s teaching experience tailored my practices to a kid-and-unicorn-friendly experience. I do think, however, that her constant demands for demonstrations of poses, requiring me to get on the floor, were more for her amusements than edification.

What was your first impression when you saw Jennifer Sattler’s amazing cover?

We were absolutely charmed.  And we are so excited to be working with such a celebrated and talented artist.

What’s your favorite part about the cover and Jennifer’s illustrations of your story?

The softness and playfulness of Jennifer’s illustrations set exactly the right tone for a children’s practice.  And we love that while the unicorn students provide comic relief, the teacher’s poses are spot-on.  Namaste to Jennifer!

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Image copyright Jennifer Sattler, 2020, text copyright Gina Cascone and Bryony Williams Sheppard, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

You also team up to give presentations at schools.  What do your visits entail?

We usually visit a school for a full day, spending about forty-five minutes with each grade, level K-5.  We discuss developing an idea, doing research, writing and rewriting. We like to spend most of our time answering students’ questions, to relate to their experiences and encourage their interests and creativity. The goal is always to engage and inspire children.

Do you have an anecdote from a school presentation or other event you could share?

One of the most touching things about school visits is that students treat us like rock stars.  The little ones all want hugs.  And the older students bombard us with questions.

When I was writing Deadtime Stories, the schedule was challenging – a book a month and there were seventeen in all. It was hard to keep track of every plot line. At a school visit, one very careful reader asked a specific question about one of the earlier books – his favorite. I couldn’t remember the character. I couldn’t remember the plot. I could barely remember the title. I took a deep breath and asked him what he thought about it and if he would have done anything differently. The conversation changed immediately to the process of storytelling and how writers make creative choices.

I learned then what Bree knows all too well, in the classroom you’ve always got to be fast on your feet.

It’s National Unicorn Day.  How do you think your Unicorn would spend the holiday?

Enjoying all the magic this world has to offer in deepest gratitude. And eating ice cream.

What a sweet way to end our chat! Thanks, Gina and Bryony! I can’t wait until Unicorn Yoga hits bookstores on July 15!

You can connect with Gina and Bree on their Website | Facebook | Twitter

Meet Jennifer Sattler

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Jennifer Sattler is the award-winning author and illustrator of numerous children’s books, including the new board books Dirty Birdies and Jungle Gym, the picture book Sylvie, and the Pig Kahuna and the Chick ’n’ Pug series. She lives in upstate New York, where she delights in embarrassing her children and having meaningful conversations with her dog, Henry.

Hi Jennifer! I’m excited to be talking with you today about this special book. When I first saw the cover, I was immediately drawn to the unicorn’s eyes. I love how they promise lots of fun while also inviting kids to join in practicing yoga.

Thanks! I’m glad you see that in her eyes. Because this is the teacher, she had to be doing a pose “correctly,” but I also wanted to hint at the fun and silly ways that the other unicorns do these poses. It’s not all serious business.

Did you need to do any special research for drawing yoga poses or did you rely on your own knowledge?

I’ve done yoga for years. But, having a UNICORN do yoga is a whole different thing! I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but their bodies are slightly different than ours…plus there’s the issue of the horn. It tends to get in the way in certain poses. I had a lot of different solutions to that, but we settled on the horn being “bendy.” The younger ones have shorter horns, so they don’t get in the way as much.

You’re also the author/illustrator of many books that are sweet and funny and make kids laugh—which you say is your passion. Has humor always been a big part of your life?

I have always loved the earnest try that ends up in laughs. It cracks me up every time, whether it’s a “grown up” or a kid…or a unicorn. Laughter is the most important part of my life, it makes me happy when nothing else can. I hope I can share some of it.

On your website, you mention that part of your school presentations includes talking to kids about the mistakes and changes that are made along the way to finishing a book and how fun—and funny—those can be. Were there any mistakes or surprising changes that occurred while you created the illustrations for Unicorn Yoga? Can you share a bit about it?

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As I always do when starting a new book, I went through tons of sketches to try to get the look of my characters. I assumed I knew what a unicorn looked like, but it took a LOT of drawings to realize, “wait a minute, they just look like horses with party hats on. That’s not right!”  I look back at those early drawings and they crack me up. It’s best for me not to take myself too seriously!

What’s the best part of being a children’s author and illustrator for you?

Kids,kids,kids! I was a painter for years, making big oil paintings to hang on the wall, teaching college students. I was trying to be taken very seriously! But it wasn’t much fun. As soon as I started doing children’s books I thought, “YES! This is what I should’ve been doing the whole time!”

Thanks for talking with me, Jennifer! I’m sure readers—both young and young at heart—are looking forward to doing yoga with your charming unicorns. I know I am!

You can learn more about Jennifer Sattler, her books, and her art on her website.

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You can preorder Unicorn Yoga with these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 3 – It’s Children’s Authors and Illustrators Week

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About the Holiday

This week was established to raise awareness and promote literacy and the joys and benefits of reading. During the week, children’s authors and illustrators attend special events at schools, bookstores, libraries, and other community centers to share their books and get kids excited about reading. To learn more about how you can instill a lifelong love of learning in your children, visit ChildrensAuthorsNetwork!

I received a copy of What’s Up, Maloo? from Tundra Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m excited to partner with Tundra in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

What’s Up, Maloo?

By Geneviève Godbout

 

Maloo is a little kangaroo with an especially hoppy spring in his step. But one day he feels grounded. Instead of hop, hop, hopping to see his friend, he takes “One step. Two steps, Three steps.” Wombat immediately notices that something’s amiss and asks, “What’s up, Maloo?” She brings him inside her cozy den and gives him a slice of pie. While she slides another treat into the oven, Maloo sits forlornly at the table, not touching his pie.

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Copyright by Geneviève Godbout, 2020, courtesy of Tundra Books.

They go down to the river—“Four steps. Five steps. Six steps”—where Crocodile sees it too and asks Maloo what’s wrong. Perhaps a swim will cheer Maloo up, but he sits dejectedly atop his ball and floats with the current. The three go to see Koala. They all want to help Maloo feel better. They try giving him a lift with an electric fan, but the wind just knocks Maloo head over heels.

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Copyright by Geneviève Godbout, 2020, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Maloo’s friends stay with him, though––“ten steps…one hundred steps…one thousand steps.” They stretch out a blanket and fling Maloo into the air, giving him encouragement. Can he hop? Maloo falls…but springs up again. “Hop!” He floats down, but this time instead of feeling dejected, he’s looking up. Back into the air he goes. He descends, but something is rising up in him. Maloo jumps with a gigantic “Hop!” He smiles. Koala climbs on Maloo’s back while Wombat and Crocodile balance on pogo sticks, and they all “hop like Maloo!’”

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Copyright by Geneviève Godbout, 2020, courtesy of Tundra Books.

With her powerfully emotional images and spare text, Geneviève Godbout allows readers to identify with Maloo as he experiences a time of sadness and recovers happiness with the help of his friends. In her soft, earth-toned illustrations, Godbout provides many perspectives and good examples for children and adults to discuss. Having lost his hop, Maloo seeks out one friend, who engages another friend and yet another, showing children the reassurance and help available by reaching out and having a supportive network. Maloo’s friends are also sensitive to Maloo’s mood, encouraging readers to pay attention to and acknowledge changes they may see in their friends and family. As readers count Maloo’s steps, they’ll see that sometimes the road back to feeling happy can be long, but that good friends stick with you no matter what or how long it takes. They also learn that asking for help starts with one step.

A moving and accessible resource for parents and caregivers to talk with their children about the ups and downs of life and the emotions of sadness and depression, What’s Up, Maloo? is a valuable addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 7

Tundra Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-0735266643

To learn more about Geneviève Godbout, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Geneviève Godbout

Born and raised in Quebec, Geneviève Godbout studied traditional animation in Montreal and at the prestigious Gobelins school in Paris. She is the illustrator of a number of books for children, including The Pink Umbrella, When Santa Was a Baby, Kindergarten Luck (Chronicle), and Joseph Fipps (Enchanted Lion). Some of her clients include The Walt Disney Company, Chronicle, HMH, Flammarion, Bayard, Les éditions Milan and La Pastèque. She also works for clothing designers like Nadinoo and Mrs. Pomeranz, creating illustrations and prints for their collections. Connect with Geneviève on her website.

Congratulations on What’s Up, Maloo, your debut picture book as both author and illustrator! Can you talk a little about the journey you’ve taken with this book?

Thank you! I never expected to be an author, but one day I woke up with the feeling I should write my own story about depression. I pictured this little kangaroo that lost his hop and told my French publisher (La Pastèque) about it. The whole creative process was natural, yet I felt incredibly insecure about my own capacities. But once published, we had such a fantastic response that I’m now working on a sequel with the little crocodile! 

What was your inspiration for this story and why this subject is important to you? What do you hope children will take away from your story?

I was inspired by my own experience of depression. I wanted to say that it’s ok to go through tough times and emphasize the importance of being surrounded without judgement. We should feel safe to confess our feelings to a friend. We don’t have to go through this alone. 

Your illustrations of Maloo feeling sad and losing the spring in his step are touching and instantly recognizable for children. How can adults use the book to talk with their children about the strong feelings of sadness and depression from multiple viewpoints, including the sufferer themselves and their friends?

I chose not to mention why Maloo lost his hop so that kids and adults can fill the gap in the text with their own experience. Maloo’s friends are sweet and full of empathy. I pictured this book as a comforter rather than a sad story. 

You’ve brought iconic characters Anne of Green Gables and Mary Poppins to books for the youngest readers. What are the challenges and joys of working with these beloved characters?
It was quite an intimidating challenge. These characters are so loved by readers (and myself!) that everyone has their own expectations of what they should look like. For instance, Mary Poppins is dramatically different in the original books by P.L. Travers from the Disney movie. But when we think about Mary Poppins, most people picture Julie Andrews, not a severe looking lady with very tall feet. With that in mind, I tried to find my own way of drawing both Mary Poppins and Anne Shirley. It was such an exciting opportunity, I reminded myself to have fun during the creative process without anticipating the public response too much. 

From characters’ round, expressive eyes, rosy cheeks, and sweet grins to animated action punctuated with humor to your gorgeous colors, your picture book illustrations are truly distinctive. How did you develop your signature style?

A style is the expression of one’s sensitivity and creativity. Mine evolved throughout the years as I gained experience and technique. And for some reason, I chose the most time-consuming medium: color pencils! I have always loved them. They’re delicate and precise. My background in traditional animation also has a huge part in the way I draw today. Everything is about movement and expressive posing. 

What do you love best about creating books for children?

I love the idea of touching people and offering them a safe bubble where they can smile and relax. There is nothing better than hearing a child or an adult say they love to curl up in bed with one of my books. 

You went to school in Paris, you’ve worked in London, and now you live in Montreal. Could you name one of your favorite places in each city and tell why you love it?

I was lucky to live in such fabulous and inspiring cities. I loved to get lost in Paris and walk by the Thames river near Hammersmith in London. Each time I go back, it feels a bit like home. As for Montreal, I think it’s the best place in terms of quality of life and I love the contrast between the seasons!

What’s up next for you?

I’m working on a couple of exciting projects including a sequel for What’s up, Maloo? and a third book in the Anne series. I’m kind of booked for the next year or so with Harper Collins, Random House, Comme des Géants, and perhaps Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, but I’m not sure what I’m allowed to say at this stage! 

Thanks, Geneviève! It was wonderful chatting with you. I’m really looking forward to seeing the sequel to What’s Up, Maloo? and all of your upcoming books!

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You can find What’s Up, Maloo? at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

November 8 – National STEM/STEAM Day

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About the Holiday

Instituted in 2015, National STEM/STEAM Day aims to encourage kids to explore the fields of science technology, engineering, art, and math. These subjects are the backbone of innovation and discovery. Children who are introduced early on to the workings of math and science do better as they advance through school and are more likely to choose science-based careers. Solving many of the problems that the world now faces relies on having a workforce who can think creatively and inventively to design a better future for us all. To learn more about STEM and STEAM and to find activities to get kids excited about these subjects, visit the TERC website.

The Brain Is Kind of a Big Deal

By Nick Seluk

 

Are you a fan of The Brainiacs? You know, that group led by the Brain that keeps you humming along all day, every day? Yeah, they’re at the top of the (medical) charts, and it’s the Brain that keeps them there. Want to know more about how their body of work all comes together? Then settle in with Nick Seluk’s hip, informative, and clever introduction to the brain and all that it does from its command center “inside of your head, behind your eyes, and under your hair.” From there the brain works continuously, collecting and remembering “information about everything you experience.”

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Copyright Nick Seluk, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

Ready to turn the page? You can’t do it without your brain telling your arm, your hand, and your fingers what to do—and in what seems like no time at all. As you turn the pages you’ll learn how the brain sends these messages to the muscles and organs through synapses, which is a little bit like passing notes in class, and along a “highway” of nerves. Turn a few more pages and you’ll learn about involuntary and voluntary functions, how you know when to eat and when you’re full, and how when you sleep and dream, your brain gets ready for the next day.” Even when “…it dreams about weird stuff.”

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Copyright Nick Seluk, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

But the Brain isn’t a solo act. He collaborates with the senses, which work through the eyes, ears, nose, tongue, and nervous system, to collect data that helps you remember what things look, sound, smell, and feel like. The brain is great at doing stuff, but it’s also an awesome thinker. With your own incredible brain “you can imagine things and solve problems just by thinking about them.” Ideas aren’t the only things that come from the brain; feelings to too. And the interesting thing about this is that while “you feel happy, sad, angry, or scared without ever having to learn how, you can control how you react when you feel something….” So, what does all of this brain power add up to? Everything that makes you YOU!”

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Copyright Nick Seluk, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

Back matter includes a glossary of terms found in the book, wild facts about animal brains (did you know “a cockroach can live for weeks without its head and brain?”), and a round up The Brainiacs bandmates’ social media posts. The reverse side of the book jacket contains a The Brainiacs concert poster. The front end papers’ riffs on album covers can make for fun adult/child nostalgia bonding,

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Copyright Nick Seluk, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

Fascinating facts about the brain and how it works are accompanied by Nick Seluk’s charming cartoon-style illustrations of anthropomorphized organs, muscles, neurons, and of course the star of the book, the brain—a spectacle-wearing pink orb. These characters are full of personality and puns while taking orders from upstairs. The heart is “pumped” watching messages speed along the nervous system; eyes cry when they receiving the command after an “ouch!” is sent from a nerve to the brain; and the lungs are astonished to learn they must gasp and huff “forever.” Seluk’s writing is clear and engaging, translating the communications from the brain to the rest of the body into steps and purposes that children can understand. Seluk’s sly humor, sprinkled throughout the book, is always in service of the text and allows kids to relate to the concept at hand.

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As the brain recalls information it’s learned, it huddles in a command center where the computer identifies a tree by these attributes. “Sight: Green and Brown; Sound: Rustling; Touch: Rough; Taste: Gross.” When the brain sees a hand hovering over a stove burner, it goes to work. The ring is “bright red, stove says ‘On,’ Mom said ‘No,’ smells hot.” The brain sends out its urgent warning: “Abort! Don’t touch that! Remember last time?! The brain sure does, as the picture of it with bandaged hands on the computer screen shows. Full-bleed, vibrant backgrounds set off the comic-strip panels, funny interactions between Brain and Nose, Ears, Tongue, and other body parts, and Smart Stuff sidebars full of interesting tidbits. Kids will gain valuable knowledge about the body as they giggle through the text in Seluk’s sharp presentation that deftly navigates the dual hemispheres of fun and learning to spotlight the brain for the rock star it is.

You can’t go wrong by adding The Brain is Kind of a Big Deal to your home, classroom, or public library. It is—as they say—a no brainer!

Ages 6 – 8

Orchard Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1338167009

Discover more about Nick Seluk, his books, his art, and so much more on his website.

National STEM/STEAM Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-scientists-word-search-puzzle

Be a Scientist!

 

If you love STEAM subjects at school, you could grow up to be one of the scientists in this printable word search puzzle. Which would you choose?

What Kind of Scientist Would You Be? Puzzle and Solution

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You can find The Brain is Kind of a Big Deal at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

 

 

 

October 24 – National Food Day

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About the Holiday

Established in 2011 by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, National Food Day aims to raise awareness of nutrition issues and encourage people to “Eat Real.” Eating real means “cutting back on sugary drinks, overly salted packaged foods and fatty, factory-farmed meats in favor of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and sustainably raised protein.” Prominent food activists help people discover where they can find food that is healthy and affordable. Another goal is to promote food production that is mindful of the environment, farm animals, and farmers. The efforts of National Food Day continue year round and culminate on October 24 with special events.

I received a copy of Now You Know What You Eat from Orchard Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m excited to be teaming with Orchard Books in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Now You Know What You Eat: Pictures and Answers for the Curious Mind

By Valorie Fisher

 

As you lick an ice cream cone, dip your spoon into a bowl of macaroni and cheese, or crunch on a pickle, do you ever think about all of the ingredients that go into it or where those ingredients come from? That’s the fascinating premise behind Now You Know What You Eat. Valorie Fisher presents this information in bright graphic form with an inviting vintage touch. Her clearly marked pages make connections that even the youngest readers can follow.

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Copyright Valorie Fisher, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books.

First up is that delicious summer treat—the ice cream cone. For kids this may look like cone + vanilla ice cream, but that pointy (or flat bottom) cup is made up of “flour + sugar + eggs + butter.” And the scoop? That’s made from “cream + milk + sugar + eggs + vanilla extract.” But where does all that stuff come from, a curious kid may wonder. Fisher has that covered too. Running along the bottom of the page is a pictorial which shows that eggs come from a chicken, flour comes from wheat, milk, cream, and butter come from a cow, sugar comes from sugarcane, and vanilla extract comes from the vanilla orchid.

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Copyright Valorie Fisher, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books.

Children will be amazed to see what a collage the Oatmeal Raisin Cookie is and where the ground cinnamon that gives them their spice and the baking soda that helps the dough rise come from. There’s even a little tutorial on how the cookies are made once the dough is mixed. That seemingly simple peanut butter sandwich is another work of art. Among other things, kids learn how jelly is thickened, the difference between whole wheat bread and white bread, and the role of yeast in bread making. They may also find it interesting that the peanut, despite its name, is not a nut at all, but a legume.

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Copyright Valorie Fisher, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books.

We all know mac ‘n’ cheese is scrumptious comfort food, but there’s a lot more to it than that—and readers will discover some surprising ingredients that go into the making of cheese. A short primer on macaroni dishes up some favorite shapes. Want to know how chocolate’s made? There’s a two-page spread for that too. From the cacao pod to the oven to the mold and every step in between, children discover how this favorite comes to be as well as the fact that “dark chocolate = milk chocolate – milk” and “white chocolate = milk chocolate – cocoa mass. The makings of maple syrup, dill pickles, lemonade, yogurt, vegetable soup, pizza, honey, and potato chips are also explored. A few ingredients, like milk, eggs, corn, and apples, are given an entire page to explain how it is grown or produced.

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Copyright Valorie Fisher, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books.

Valorie Fisher combines symbols, such as addition and subtraction signs, brackets, and equal signs to show how separate ingredients are combined to become a favorite food. She also includes easy-to-understand text that explains more about each ingredient or finished dish and where base ingredients come from and/or how they are grown. Fisher also talks about the variety of milk-producing animals, kinds of corn, and types of apples and citrus fruits around the world. Noteworthy facts, such as how much milk one cow produces each week and that a person could stand on an egg without cracking it, will captivate kids.

Graphics-loving kids will immediately gravitate toward Fisher’s pages that use readily recognizable, but generic, images to deconstruct food into its individual parts. Presented on alternating colored squares, strips and blocks, the steps are easy to follow. Her vibrant choices highlight the food and draw readers in to linger over each page and its absorbing content. Illustrated pages also contain a guide to the makeup of a healthy plate; a chart outlining the minerals and vitamins in the foods presented and how they help the body; and a glossary.

Now You Know What You Eat: Pictures and Answers for the Curious Mind will entice readers of all ages to dig deeper into learning what goes into the food they eat and is an excellent accompaniment to cookbooks and nutrition guides at home and in school and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 8

Orchard Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1338215465

To learn more about Valorie Fisher, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Now You Know What You Eat Giveaway

I’m happy to be partnering with Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc. in a giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Now You Know What You Eat, by Valorie Fisher

There are two ways to be entered to win:

  • Follow me on Twitter @CelebratePicBks and Retweet one of my giveaway tweets.
  • Leave a comment on this blog post
  • Bonus: Reply with favorite food for extra entry

This giveaway is open from October 25 through October 31 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on November 1.

Giveaways open to US addresses only | Prizing provided by Scholastic, Inc.

National Food Day Activity

CPB - Noodle Puzzle

Noodle on This! Puzzle

 

Pasta is a perennial favorite! Help these noodles get to the right plate, bowl, or pot in this printable Noodle on This puzzle that’s as wiggly as a wet noodle!

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You can find Now You Know What You Eat: Pictures and Answers for the Curious Mind at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 30 – National Doctors’ Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday dates back to March 30, 1933 when Eudora Brown Almond of Winder, Georgia, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, wanted to honor physicians everywhere. To celebrate on that day, greeting cards of appreciation were sent and flowers placed on graves of former doctors. Today, the red carnation is recognized as the symbol for Doctors’ Day.

March 30th was chosen because it marked the first time—in 1842—that anesthesia was used during surgery. Dr. Crawford W. Long administered ether before operating, and afterward the patient declared that he neither felt nor remembered anything about the procedure. In 1991, President George Bush proclaimed Doctors’ Day to be a National observance. To celebrate, send your doctor a message thanking them for their care. You might also consider donating to a charitable medical organization that provides services around the world.

Dragons Get Colds Too

Written by Rebecca Roan | Illustrated by Charles Santoso

 

If you’ve adopted a dragon recently, you may have discovered that they get colds too. “However, caring for a sick dragon can be a daunting task.” Here are some tips on making your pet feel better. For dragons, paper tissues have more than a little flammability possibility, so they tend to prefer sleeves—your sleeves to be precise. Be sure, then, to always carry extra shirts.

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Image copyright Charles Santoso, 2019, text copyright Rebecca Roan, 2019. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Trying to give your dragon cold medicine? Being met with firmly clamped lips? “It’s best to have a full dance routine ready” to distract it. After you’ve gotten it to take its medicine, it’s time to feed a cold…or is it feed a fever? Either way, spicy hot food does the trick. Just be sure to wear protective gear for those “fiery sneezes” to come.

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Image copyright Charles Santoso, 2019, text copyright Rebecca Roan, 2019. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

After some entertainment, it’s time for your dragon to take a nap. What to do when it refuses? A special book-reading nook may be just the thing. And never disturb a dragon when it finally falls asleep—no matter where that is! Finally, your dragon will begin feeling better. But recovery time is important too. For dragons this doesn’t mean taking it easy, though. For music-loving dragons you may want to provide some tunes or instruments. And for yourself? Perhaps a pair of earplugs.

Soon—because of all your help—your dragon will be back to its old self again, and the two of you will be back to your adventures!

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Image copyright Charles Santoso, 2019, text copyright Rebecca Roan, 2019. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

In her guide to caring for a sick dragon, Rebecca Roan channels the concerns and comic turns that can often accompany treating a child with a cold. Providing steps, facts, and tips, Roan mirrors the creative thinking adults do to get kids to take medicine, rest, and eat a little something. Both adults and children will laugh as they recognize the symptoms of spending sick days at home.

Charles Santoso’s illustrations hilariously depict the discrepancy between a perfect patient who calmly takes the doctor’s advice and the reality at home. With an ooey-gooey runny nose, fiery sneezes, and a healthy dose of uproarious activity, the dragon is funny and endearing. When both the patient and the caregiver recover, readers will be charmed by their return to the fun they enjoy together.

Dragons Get Colds Too is an amusing and entertaining remedy for any day but especially for days when kids feel under the weather.

Ages 3 – 6

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1681190440

To learn more about Charles Santoso, his books, and his art on his website.

National Doctors’s Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-printable-snakes-and-ladders-game

Snakes and Ladders Game

 

Playing a board game with a child is a good way to keep them occupied while they’re recovering! Here’s a printable Snakes and Ladders game for you to enjoy! 

Supplies

Directions

  1. Print the board game template
  2. Determine which player goes first by rolling the die. The player with the highest roll goes first.
  3. The first player rolls the die and moves along the game board, starting at square 1, the number of spaces indicated on the die.
  4. Other players take turns rolling the die and moving along the board.
  5. The first player to reach square 100 is the winner

Ladders: When a player lands on a space with the bottom of a ladder in it, the player moves up to the space at the top of the ladder and continues to play from there.

Snakes: When a player lands on a space with the head of a snake in it, the player slides down to the space with the snake’s tail in it and continues to play from there.

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You can find Dragons Get Colds Too at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review