April 19 – National Hanging Out Day and Interview with Author/Illustrator Catherine Lazar Odell

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pepper-and-frannie-cover

About the Holiday

National Hanging Out Day began in 1995 as a way to encourage people to use less electricity by hanging out their laundry. A look at social media shows that it’s also celebrated at a day to get out and enjoy some time with friends. Why not combine them both? While your wash is drying, take a break with your friends or family and do something fun—or learn a new skill like the Pepper in today’s story!

I received a copy of Pepper and Frannie from Page Street Kids for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m excited to be teaming with Page Street Kids in a giveaway of two copies of the book. See details below.

Pepper and Frannie

By Catherine Lazar Odell

 

“Pepper is practical and prepared, and follows the rules. Fannie is fancy and free, and follows her own path.” They are best friends. They love to go on adventures together and enjoy activities in their own particular way. This weekend they’re heading off to the forest—Pepper to photograph a wildflower and Frannie to participate in the Wheels in the Woods skateboarding festival.

As Pepper passes the bus stop on her motorcycle, she’s flagged down by Frannie, who has missed her bus. When they get to the festival, Pepper’s interested in what’s going on, and Frannie convinces her to stay. “Pepper is mesmerized. She snaps photos of perfect flips, ollies, and tailstalls on the half pipe,” as Frannie joins the skaters.

Then Frannie wants Pepper to try skating. When she stands on the board, she feels a bit shaky, but Frannie is right there to support and teach her. When Frannie thinks Pepper is ready, she lets go of her friend. Pepper glides along until…she falls. Then “Pepper is done skating.” But Frannie has her up and trying again and again until…she’s got it. The two speed down the forest path with the other skaters. Pepper’s success inspires her to dream of all the things she could accomplish. They spend the rest of the day skating and helping each other when they fall. It becomes a weekend adventure to remember.

Catherine Lazar Odell takes kids out to the skate park in her fresh and original story about friendship and the courage to try new things. For more cautious Pepper, succeeding on the skateboard is a revelation and leads her to contemplate all the things she might be and do. Frannie exemplifies the kind of enthusiasm, camaraderie, and support a good friend shows to a more reluctant companion, and the friends’ love and concern for each other is a highlight of the story.

Odell’s evocative and action-packed mixed-media illustrations will charm readers as Frannie hops up and down and waves her arms with excitement and Pepper gets up again and again while learning her new skill. Images of the skateboarding characters doing tricks on their boards will thrill young skaters and would-be skaters. Early images of Pepper reading a “stay on path” sign but then leaving the path to photograph a wildflower and her choice of a motorbike for transportation both hint at Pepper’s unrecognized bravery.

A lovely book sure to encourage and inspire kids to reach out of their comfort zone as well as to support friends in their varied pursuits, Pepper and Frannie would be heartening addition to home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 8

Page Street Kids, 2019 | ISBN 978-1624146602

To learn more about Catherine Lazar Odell, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Catherine Lazar Odell

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Catherine-Lazar-Odell-headshot

I’m excited to be talking with Catherine Lazar Odell today about how her world travels influences her work, the most rewarding part about being a children’s author, the value of community and more. 

Pepper and Frannie is your debut as an author-illustrator. You’re also the illustrator for the recently released I’m Done! with Gretchen Brandenburg McLellan. What inspired you to start writing and illustrating for children?

To be honest, writing and illustrating books was not the career I had been dreaming of since I was little. I’ve never had that kind of clarity. But I’ve always loved drawing, and I’ve always loved things that were deceptively simple. I was visiting my parents at a point when I wasn’t totally sure what I was going to do next. I had worked at a fancy design job, and I had toured as a musician in a band, and I was just getting by on freelance design gigs and starting to dedicate more time to drawing from my imagination. My mother had kept a couple shelves of my favorite books from childhood and I found myself in the basement flipping through them, absolutely flooded with memories and excitement. I couldn’t believe how much had stuck with me after all these years. It was almost like I could see some of the blueprints to my own way of thinking.  It was actually my brother who suggested I give it a try. He’s always been my biggest fan.

You’ve traveled all over the world and called many places home. How did those experiences influence your creative development? What’s one thing you’ve learned that you’d like to pass on to kids?

As we flew from one side of the world to the other, I remember thinking about all the people we were passing over, all the different countries, cities and towns, and how different their lives were from mine. I was fascinated by all the ways you could grow up, and while I felt like I was getting a sampling platter, I knew that others were having very specific experiences—on a farm, in a city, somewhere hot, somewhere cold, in a big house, or a little hut. I guess this might have contributed to my obsession with the idea that we are all different, but we are the same. I believe that it’s important to celebrate and honor our unique stories, and then to remember that those differences make us stronger when we work together.

You’ve created designs for many companies. Can you reveal one or two designs we’d recognize?

Nothing that really made it to a shelf. Most of the work I’ve done for recognizable companies was what we call ‘blue sky’ design, so it was more conceptual and behind the scenes—great work for a dreamer. That work also helped develop my interest in storytelling, because at the end of the day it’s less about the object and more about the story it tells or the one it is a part of. I learned a lot about everything that goes into making a single bottle of shampoo, or a diaper. Yes, I worked on diapers, and I can tell you that the technology and design behind those things is riveting. 

As a new author, what are some of the things you’re enjoying most about the process and engaging with readers?

I love hearing the responses I get while sharing the book—comments, questions, interruptions—attention is a wonderful gift. When I see young minds giving thought and consideration to something I spent many, many hours developing, it’s the best reward. I’m also thrilled about meeting all the people that have such a passion for books and helping to bring them to young readers.

I love Pepper and Frannie and their seemingly opposite personalities. One of my favorite parts of your book comes when Pepper skateboards for the first time without Frannie’s help, but then falls. The simple line that follows—“Pepper is done skating.”—is such an honest reaction, and it sets up a wonderful sense of suspense in the story. What is some advice you’d give for encouraging a child (or an adult) to keep trying?

I have been stopping at this page during readings and asking kids if they think Pepper will try again. I feel like it’s pretty obvious—all the great stories have so much failure before the success! But I’ve been shocked to hear some “no’s” from a few children at readings. I want to come to a full stop and talk to them, but instead I turn the page and hope that they can get a different perspective by the end of the book. One girl who said no at my last reading came up and gave me an unannounced hug before leaving. That might be the best moment so far. I want to remind folks (at any age) that the enjoyment is in the effort, and every time you try, you’re one step closer to getting it.

Skating is a perfect example because it’s so literal: falling is an inescapable part of learning. Really great skaters have fallen a lot more than skaters with less skill. It’s the same with writing, or playing an instrument, or baking…everything! I’ve always been drawn to perseverance. My favorite book when I was very small was The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss. That little boy planted a seed and he believed the carrot would come up. He watered it and tended to it, and it didn’t look like anything was happening, but he believed.  And, of course, underneath, things were happening. He remained faithful through the constant skepticism from others and guess what—the carrot came up. Ugh, I still get the feels just thinking about that final page turn.

Animals feature prominently in your work. What do you love about animals and nature?

What’s not to love? I think it’s easy to forget that we share this place, and to think of ourselves as separate from the natural world. But I think anything that deepens our sense of connection is really important, from a good poem, to a community garden, or a walk in the park, or… bunnies on skateboards. Making art takes a lot of time, so it’s good to make art about things you love.

You can be found at the Portland Saturday Market selling your work, at P & Q’s Market holding Sip and Sketch gatherings with a friend. Can you describe both of these and talk a little about how connecting with the community this way inspires you?

Let’s see, The Portland Saturday Market is a craft market that is open every weekend March – December, and it has been running for over 40 years. It’s a big attraction for visitors to the city, and I’m in my 6th season now—not sure how that happened! It has been a wonderful way to connect with others through my work. I get to people watch for two days a week, and it takes me out of my bubble. People are an endless source of inspiration. I get to watch facial reactions, and hear what memories come up for people when they look at my drawings. I also see what doesn’t resonate. It’s all helpful.

P’s and Q’s is entirely different. It’s more like a neighborhood restaurant with a small food market. It’s the epitome of quaint, and the perfect place to have a group sit around a farm table and enjoy each other’s company. Selfishly, hosting a drawing night has been a great reason for me to get out of the house, eat a delicious meal and draw without purpose—it’s more like art therapy. I always come home with some new insight or perspective or curiosity, and maybe a new friend. Hosting our drawing night at a space like P’s and Q’s means that all ages are welcome to join—which is important to me. Connecting with other humans in real spaces is something we are doing less and less, and I don’t think that it’s benefiting us. I’m inclined to think that gathering together is almost a subversive act at this point. A casual drawing night is very low key, and it takes off some of the social discomfort for introverts.

What’s up next for you?

Book 2 for Pepper and Frannie! I’m deep in the final art-making phase right now, and really excited that I get to continue their story. The second book experience has been totally different from the first, mainly because I’m more comfortable with the process of making a book. It’s such a long timeline, but now that I know more about what to expect I’m able to settle in and enjoy it more. I’m also spending more time with the same characters. I already know them, so we can skip the getting to know you phase of character development  and jump right into a new situation. Really, I’m just digging into a different part of my own past.

What’s your favorite holiday and why?

I’m particularly fond of the New Year. I love the global awareness that comes with the idea of time sweeping around the planet. I suppose technically it’s the planet spinning and orbiting, but it kinda feels the other way around. (I know everyone doesn’t celebrate the New Year on the same day, but I’ll have to pull from my own experiences here.) I love the reflective aspects of this holiday. Looking back and looking forward, and everyone around you doing the same.

Did a holiday ever influence your work? If so, how?

Can’t say that has yet, but anything is possible.

Thanks so much Catherine for chatting with me today and sharing so much about your life and work! It’s been so nice getting to know you! I wish you the best with Pepper and Frannie and their next adventure too!

You can connect with Catherine Lazar Odell on

Her website | Instagram | Twitter

Pepper and Frannie Giveaway

I’m excited to be teaming with Page Street Kids in a Twitter giveaway of

  • One (2) copies of Pepper and Frannie by Catherine Lazar Odell

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from April 19 through April 25 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

Prizing provided by Page Street Kids.

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts. 

National Hanging Out Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-Shredding-is-Fun-Skateboarding-Word-Search

Shredding is Fun! Word Search Puzzle & Coloring  Page

 

There are so many cool tricks to learn in skateboarding! Can you find the names of fifteen tricks in this printable puzzle? Then color the skateboard in your own style!

Shredding is Fun Word Search Puzzle | Shredding is Fun Word Search Puzzle 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pepper-and-frannie-cover

You can find Pepper and Frannie at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

April 10 – National Hug Your Dog Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-thunder-pug-cover

About the Holiday

If you’re a dog owner, every day may be Hug Your Dog Day! Today was established for dog lovers to show their pets extra attention, so why not give your pup a special treat or take them for a longer than usual walk? If you’re contemplating adding a pet to your family, today may be a good day to visit your local shelter and adopt a dog to hug!

Thunder Pug

Written by Kim Norman | Illustrated by Keika Yamaguchi

 

Percy the pug loves doing things with his best friend Petunia the pig. They carve trails out of the tall grasses, blow on dandelions, play “twilight hide-and-seek,” and lap “puddles, cheek to cheek.” Sometimes they do separate things—like the time Petunia went off to the Arlington County Fair to compete in the best pig competition.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-thunder-pug-running-together

Image copyright Keika Yamaguchi, 2019, text copyright Kim Norman, 2019. Courtesy of Stirling Children’s Books.

Petunia returned to the farm wearing a blue ribbon. “Percy was proud of her,” but so were all the other animals. They picked her up and rushed around the yard, cheering. Every time Percy tried to offer his congratulations, she was whisked away. Percy’s high-five went amiss, the flowers he offered were “nearly trampled,” and “the kiss he blew floated away, lost on the wind.” While Petunia is enjoying all the attention, however, Percy feels dejected and ignored.

Then one day he found an old superhero comic book about Thunder Man who was brave and strong and had a cape that was “just as special as a first-prize ribbon.” Soon, Percy was sporting a cape and coming to the rescue—even if being Thunder Pug meant being put in danger, getting wet, or being tickled by ants. And while all of that was exciting, it just didn’t feel satisfying.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-thunder-pug-separate-activities

Image copyright Keika Yamaguchi, 2019, text copyright Kim Norman, 2019. Courtesy of Stirling Children’s Books.

Percy went back to his comic book to see what he was doing wrong. That’s when he saw it—Thunder Man had a sidekick! And just then who did he see coming toward him, but Petunia dressed up as Pink Lightning. Not a moment too soon, either. They raced to save a baby raccoon who was stuck in a tree. Maybe the rescue didn’t quite go as planned, but the baby Boing! Boing! Wheeeed! right into its mother’s arms.

With one heroic deed under their capes, Thunder Man and Pink Lightning took off to help, protect, find lost hedgehogs, and turn over flipped turtles. Now Percy and Petunia do some things apart and lots of things together and just like before, their friendship is “perfectly thunderful!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-thunder-pug-comic-book

Image copyright Keika Yamaguchi, 2019, text copyright Kim Norman, 2019. Courtesy of Stirling Children’s Books.

Percy and Petunia’s friendship forged in Kim Norman’s Puddle Pug has hit an unexpected snag as Petunia wins a blue ribbon and Percy begins to feel left out. Percy tries to play on his own, but it’s just not the same without Petunia. But has Petunia really forgotten Percy? A careful look at the illustrations shows that even while this first-rate pig is enjoying her taste of celebrity, she still has Percy in her sights. When the two come back together to create a super duo and also find new ways to spend their days, young readers will learn gentle lessons about the true nature of friendship, how new experiences can strengthen and enrich a relationship, and even the importance of giving a friend some space. Fans of Percy and Petunia will be delighted to learn that just as Percy and Petunia’s friendship grew as they pursued different activities, their own friendships will flourish as each person supports the other.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-thunder-pug-Percy

Percy and Petunia are back and as adorable as ever in Keika Yamaguchi’s soft-hued pen-and-ink and digitally painted illustrations. Yamaguchi perfectly captures the love between the two with twinkly eyes and satisfied smiles. So when Petunia wins the blue ribbon and starts hanging out with other friends, the dichotomy between Petunia’s bright grin and Percy’s disappointment is pronounced. Readers will also notice that along with the smiles, Petunia expresses distress of her own as she’s pulled away from Percy, and Percy, while sad, discovers happiness in helping others. The changing emotions of friendships are part of navigating childhood; Percy and Petunia give kids and adults the opportunity to discuss them and find their way through the maze of growing up.

Ages 3 and up

Sterling Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1454923589

Discover more about Kim Norman and her books on her website.

To learn more about Keika Yamaguchi, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Hug Your Dog Day Activity

Find the Pet Maze

 

This detective is looking for a dog to hug. Can you help her find her way to a puppy to love in this printable puzzle? 

Find the Pet Maze | Find the Pet Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-thunder-pug-cover

You can find Thunder Pug at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

April 3 – National Walking Day and Interview with Author Jane Whittingham

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-queenie-quail-can't-keep-up-cover

About the Holiday

The American Heart Association established National Walking Day in 2007 to remind people of the benefits of taking a walk. Even twenty to thirty minutes a day can improve your health and wellbeing. If you have a desk job or spend long hours sitting, getting up and out can make you feel better and even more connected to your community. While walking through your neighborhood, the park, or the woods take time to notice interesting details and the beauty around you. Walking with a friend, your family, or a group can also be fun and motivating. So grab your sneakers and use today to spark a new habit that will pay dividends now and in the future.

I received a copy of Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up from Pajama Press for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be partnering with Pajama Press in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up

Written by Jane Whittingham | Illustrated by Emma Pedersen

 

Twice every day Mama Quail led her ten chicks through the meadow, and while nine hurried and scurried along after Mama, Queenie, the smallest, always lagged behind. Mama and the other chicks chirped and cheeped for Queenie to “hurry hurry hurry,” but it was just so hard when there was so much to see. Queenie loved stopping to look at the “pink blossoms and green grass, shiny stones and fuzzy caterpillars, buzzy bumblebees and wiggly worms.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-queenie-quail-can't-keep-up-bee

Image copyright Emma Pedersen, 2019, text copyright Jane Whittingham, 2019. Courtesy of Pajama Press.

Her papa admonished her to learn to hurry—“It is what we quails do!” he told her. And Queenie promised to try. She really did try too, but she just couldn’t pass by all her favorite things without stopping to enjoy them. One day, in addition to the blossoms, grass, stones, caterpillars, bees, and worms, Queenie spied a feather. And when she stopped to admire it, she saw “an unusual flash of orange.”

As Queenie watched, the “the furry orange slid softly, smoothly, silently through the green grass.” Queenie followed at a careful distance. Suddenly, Queenie saw that she was following a cat—a cat that was stalking her mama and brothers and sisters. Queenie knew just what she had to do. She raced down the path “hurry, hurry, hurrying,” chirping, cheeping, and warning her family.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-queenie-quail-can't-keep-up-hurry

Image copyright Emma Pedersen, 2019, text copyright Jane Whittingham, 2019. Courtesy of Pajama Press.

In the nick of time, Papa heard her and swooped down on the cat. Mama came running too. With a hiss, the cat jumped into the grass and fled. “‘You’ve saved us, Queenie Quail!’ Mama Quail chirped.” And Papa and her little siblings praised her too. Now, when the family heads out along the meadow trail and Queenie can’t keep up, they all ask, “‘What have you found, what have you found, what have you found?’” And they stop and hurry hurry hurry over to take a look too.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-queenie-quail-can't-keep-up-nuzzling

Image copyright Emma Pedersen, 2019, text copyright Jane Whittingham, 2019. Courtesy of Pajama Press.

Jane Whittingham’s story of an adorable quail who stops to smell all the roses is a charming, charming, charming read-aloud that adults will love sharing and kids will enthusiastically chime in on during the fun repeated phrases. Whittingham’s agile storytelling shines with lyrical rhythms and alliteration that bounce along like the little stars of her book. The gentle suspense will keep young listeners riveted to the story, and afterward they’re sure to join Queenie and her brothers and sisters in slowing down to enjoy the world around them.

Readers will immediately fall in love with Queenie and her siblings as Emma Pedersen’s cute-as-can-be, tufted quail babies race and bob along the trail to keep up with Mama. With expressive eyes and tiny beaks that form a perpetual smile, they nestle next to Mama and pile on top of Papa. As they watch out for Queenie, one or two often peer out at readers, inviting them along on their excursions. As the heroine of the story, Queenie is a sweetie, fascinated by everything she sees. Pedersen’s lovely gauche paintings are as fresh as a spring meadow and will entice kids and adults to take a nice slow walk together.

A unique and tender story that will have children entranced from the first page, Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up will be a favorite on home, school, and public library shelves.

Ages 3 – 7

Pajama Press, 2019 | ISBN 978-1772780673

You’ll discover more about Jane Whittingham and her books as well as blog posts, interviews, and lots more on her website.

To learn more about Emma Pedersen, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Jane Whittingham

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Jane-Whittingham-Interview-headshot

Today, I’m excited to be talking with Jane Whittingham an author and librarian from British Columbia, Canada, about the inspiration for her adorable quails, what she loves about being a librarian, and how nature features in her life and books.

I believe Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up was inspired by your dad and a true story. Can you talk about that a little?

My parents moved to a small town on Vancouver Island when they retired, and their backyard is home to all sorts of wildlife, including families of quails that hurry and scurry here and there. My dad  always liked watching them, and he mentioned to me once that quails would make perfect picture book stars with their round little bodies and their amusing personalities and antics. Well, I was inspired! I’d never really thought much about quails, since we don’t have them where I live, so every time I visited my parents I would spend a bit of time watching the quails for inspiration.

Queenie, the little quail who is just too easily distracted to keep up with her siblings, is definitely inspired by me, and the fact that I’m always falling behind because I have to stop and look at everything! The book is a bit bittersweet to me because my father passed away before it was published, but I know he would’ve gotten a real kick out of it, and he would have probably introduced himself to everyone as my muse!  

Have you always liked to write? Can you talk a little about your process? Do you have a favorite place to write?

I’ve always been a writer, and even before I could physically write I was a storyteller. I was an only child and spent a lot of time using my toys to tell epic stories, which I would then recount breathlessly to my parents in an endless stream of words.

I don’t really have a process – like many people I fit writing around my full-time job (I’m a librarian) and into my busy life, so I snatch moments here and there whenever I can. I write on my phone, I write on scraps of paper, I write on my computer. I write on my commute, at coffee shops, and in grocery store lineups. You never know when inspiration will strike!

Besides Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up,  you have two more very well-received books out from Pajama Press—Wild One and A Good Day for Ducks. The outdoors features in all of your books in some way. Are you inspired by the outdoors? What is your favorite outside activity or a memorable experience you’ve had?

I am absolutely inspired by the outdoors – even though my childhood wasn’t that long ago in the grand scheme of things, I do feel like I had a very different childhood than many kids experience today. I spent a lot of my free time outdoors, wandering or biking around the neighborhood with a band of kids, making (and falling out of) tree forts, playing kickball on the street, and turning local playgrounds into the settings for all sorts of imaginary worlds. My parents often had no idea where I was, but that was totally normal for the time—I never left the neighborhood, and they knew I would come home when it started to get dark.

Sometimes it feels like I grew up in a whole other era! Through my books I really want to encourage families to get outside, to explore, to learn through doing and through experiencing. Nature is such an incredible source of inspiration, of knowledge, of enjoyment, and even of healing, and we really miss out on so much by cooping ourselves up in front of our screens all day long!

In doing a little research for this interview, I raided your wonderful website and discovered that you made a few resolutions this year. One is to read outside your comfort zone, which includes murder mysteries, historical fiction, and narrative nonfiction. How is that going? Can you give me one mystery title in your comfort zone and one “departure” book you’ve dipped your toes (eyes?) into?

Oh dearie me, you’re holding me accountable! I recently finished a YA novel, which is very, very unusual for me—I never read young adult fiction even when I was a young adult, so this was a major departure for me! It’s called The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali, and tells the story of a young Muslim lesbian whose family discovers her secret girlfriend and sends her off to Bangladesh to straighten her out, as it were. It’s definitely an eye-opening look into a culture and experience very different from my own, and I really enjoyed it.

As for my taste in mysteries, I tend to favour the classic British who-dunnit style, with authors like Dorothy L. Sayers and Ngaio Marsh being particular favorites. I also really enjoy mysteries with historical settings, which allow me to check off two favorite genres at once!

Queenie is an adorable little quail! What was your reaction to seeing Emma Pedersen’s illustrations for the first time? In your blog post “Queenie Quail and the Road to Publication,” you talk about needing to cut your original manuscript. Can you describe one place where the illustration reflects the text that is no longer there? Can you describe a place where Emma included something that surprised or particularly delighted you?

I was absolutely floored when I first saw Emma’s illustrations, they’re beyond wonderful, and even more adorable than I ever could have imagined! It’s a funny thing, being a picture book author, because you craft these characters and this environment, and then you hand the whole thing over to a stranger to make real—it can be a bit nerve-wracking, not knowing what your little characters will end up looking like! I was immensely relieved when I saw Queenie and her siblings, and I think Emma’s classic artistic style perfectly complements my old-fashioned writing style.

One of the aspects of the text that was really shortened related to all the things that distracted Queenie on her daily walks with her family. I described the worms and the bees and the flowers in great detail, which turned out to be entirely unnecessary, since everything appeared so beautifully in Emma’s illustrations!

And as for an illustration that particularly delighted me, there’s a spread where Mama and Papa quail nuzzle Queenie as they thank her for saving the day, and the loving expressions on everyone’s faces really just melted my heart, I loved them so much!

What drew you to becoming a librarian? What is a favorite part of your day?

I am a children’s librarian for an urban library system here in British Columbia, Canada, and I’m responsible for developing and facilitating programming for children and families in an older residential neighborhood. I get to do a lot of fun things in my job—I lead story times for caregivers and their babies, facilitate writing and book clubs for tweens, and get to host and visit local preschools, daycares and elementary schools. I think my favourite part of the entire year is Summer Reading Club, which runs from June – August every year. We spend the entire year planning all sorts of exciting programs to get kids reading all summer long, and it’s so much fun! Sometimes I can’t quite believe I get to do this as my job. I also manage the physical collections in the library, organizing and weeding the books to make sure the collection is in tip- top shape and helps meet the reading needs of my community.

I was raised in a family of voracious readers and I love working with people, so librarianship always seemed like a natural fit, but it took me quite a while to get here. I worked in various jobs for about six years following my initial graduation from university, before finally feeling confident enough to take the plunge and go back to school to do my masters in librarianship. It was a real leap of faith, quitting a well-paying, stable but unfulfilling job to take a chance on a career that everyone around me said was dying out, but it’s certainly paid out for me, so far at least! I can’t stress enough that simply loving books is not enough of a reason to become a librarian, especially not a public librarian – you really do need to love working with people more than anything, because it’s definitely not for the faint of heart sometimes!

On your website you have a gallery of pictures from libraries you’ve visited. How many libraries have you been to? Which library is the farthest from home? Which was your favorite and why?

I love visiting libraries at home and abroad, I find so much inspiration from looking at how other libraries organize their collections, decorate their spaces, and plan their events. I’m not even sure at this point how many libraries I’ve visited. I need to update my website to include the ones I visited on my most recent trip to Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Library-in-Nikko-Japan-Jane-Whittingham-Interview

Jane visits one of her favorite libraries – the Nikko Library – in Japan

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Bridge-in-Nikko-Japan-Jane-Whittingham-Interview

A view of a bridge and beyond in Nikko, Japan

Some of the furthest libraries I’ve visited have been in New Zealand and Japan (which I’ve visited on three separate occasions so far), though I’ve visited libraries in different US states and Canadian provinces, too. I don’t know that I have a single favorite library, but I do particularly enjoy visiting rural libraries – they can be so creative with their often-limited resources, and really do serve as the hearts and souls of their communities. 

What’s the best part about being a children’s author? Can you share an anecdote from an author’s event you’ve held or been part of?

I love everything about writing for kids! I really am a big kid at heart, which is why I’m a children’s librarian, too! I’ve had wonderful experiences reading my books to kids at different author events, and it’s so much fun to get everyone involved.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-author-visit-Japan-Jane-Whittingham-Interview

Jane and kids act out animals during an exciting author visit.

With Wild One I like to get kids to guess which animal they think the protagonist is pretending to be, and then we act out the animals together, which is heaps of fun, and with A Good Day for Ducks we act out all sorts of fun raining day actions, then talk together about all the things you can do, inside and outside, on a rainy day. I live in a very rainy place, so it’s important to find the joy in even the gloomiest of days! One of the most meaningful events I’ve done was a visit to a local children’s hospice, where I was able to connect with a small group of really amazing children who have been through so much in their short lives. To be able to share my stories with them, and listen to their stories, was an incredibly inspiring and moving experience.

What’s up next for you?

I’m not quite sure! I’ve got a couple of manuscripts that I’m still working on, and some that I’m waiting to hear back about from editors, so I don’t really know yet what’s coming down the pipeline. But I’ll always keep on telling stories, no matter what. 🙂

What is your favorite holiday and why?

My favourite holiday is definitely Christmas. I love Christmas. I love the music, the baking, the food, the decorating, the music, the family get-togethers, I love it all! I don’t actually do any of the decorating or baking or cooking myself, I mostly just listen to Christmas carols for a month straight and watch hours of Christmas movies on TV, but I love it all the same!

Thanks, so much, Jane! I’ve thoroughly enjoyed getting to know more about you and am sure readers have too! I wish you all the best with Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up and all of your books!

You can connect with Jane Whittingham on:

Her website | Instagram

Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Pajama Press in an Instagram giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up written by Jane Whittingham | illustrated by Emma Pedersen

This giveaway is open from April 3 through April 9 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

It’s easy to enter! Just:

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | Prizing provided by Pajama Press.

National Walking Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-whose-shoes-maze

Whose Shoes? Matching Puzzle

These kids are getting out and enjoying nature! Can you help them find the right shoes so they can start their adventures in this printable puzzle?

Whose Shoes? Matching Puzzle

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-queenie-quail-can't-keep-up-cover

You can find Queenie Quail Can’t Keep Up at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 28 – Baseball Opening Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-yogi-cover

About the Holiday

Today is what baseball fans wait for all fall and winter—Opening Day! This year is particularly exciting as it marks the 150th anniversary of America’s Pastime, commemorating the foundation of the Cincinnati Reds in 1869. So, get ready to cheer on your favorite team—and don’t forget the peanuts and cracker jacks, as the old song says!

Calkins Creek sent me a copy of Yogi for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m thrilled to be partnering with Calkins Creek in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Yogi: The Life, Loves, and Language of Baseball Legend Yogi Berra

Written by Bard Rosenstock | Illustrated by Terry Widener

 

Even as a kid, Lawdie Berra had a way with words…and sports. While he loved his family, his Italian neighborhood in St. Louis, Missouri, and his friends, he was not fond of school. “When neighbors asked, ‘How do you like school?’ Lawdie answered, ‘Closed.’” Like other boys in “The Hill,” Lawdie had baseball fever. Using borrowed equipment, makeshift bats, and shin guards made from magazines, they played in “an abandoned clay-mine dump.” Their team name was the Stags, and they were one of the best teams in the local leagues.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-yogi-school

Image copyright Terry Widener, 2019, text copyright Barb Rosenstock, 2019. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

When the Stags went asking for sponsorship for uniforms, storeowners told them “baseball was a ‘bum’s game’” and sent them on their way. Lawdie’s brothers were even asked to try out by major league teams, but their father insisted they get real jobs. When it was Lawdie’s turn to ask, they helped convince their father to let him have a chance. He finally said yes.

Lawdie joined an American Legion travel team with his friend Joey Garagiola. He had a lot to learn, and when he wasn’t playing he sat on the sidelines with his arms and legs crossed. A snake-charming yogi in a movie inspired his teammates to nickname Lawdie “Yogi,” and the name stuck. Even though his form was awkward, he was fast and helped his American Legion team to the national playoffs two years in a row. Then the St. Louis Cardinals came calling. They signed Joey, but not Yogi.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-yogi-stags

Image copyright Terry Widener, 2019, text copyright Barb Rosenstock, 2019. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

In 1942, Yogi was given a shot on a New York Yankees’ minor league team. He played for one year before enlisting in the Navy to fight in World War II. When the war ended, Yogi went back to the minor leagues. His play captured attention, and on September 22, 1946, he joined the lineup in his first major league game. He hit two homers and continued hitting. But the newspapers and his New York Yankees teammates blasted him for his looks.

When the pitchers complained about his catching and signaling, he practiced until “home plate became like Yogi’s living room—he talked to everyone there and no one came in unless he let them.” At the plate, he psyched batters out with his chatter and disarmed players and fans with his baseball smarts and goofy grin. He went on to play for nineteen seasons and helped the Yankees win ten world series. When he retired from playing, he continued with baseball for twenty-nine more years as a coach and then a manager. “Yogi knew how to help young players. Believe in yourself. Ignore the chatter. Work hard. And never forget, ‘It ain’t over till it’s over.’” People loved Yogi and his unique way with words—a love that continues today.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-yogi-young-lawdy

Image copyright Terry Widener, 2019, text copyright Barb Rosenstock, 2019. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

Back matter includes an Author’s Note about Yogi Berra’s life on and off the diamond, photographs, statistics of Yogi’s career, a note about Yogi-isms, quotes about Yogi Berra, an extensive bibliography and other resources, and a bit about the Yogi Berra Museum and Learning Center.

Barb Rosenstock’s thorough biography of Yogi Berra is a soaring tribute to this icon of baseball. His dedication and perseverance in the face of setbacks and derision is inspirational, and his good-natured, generous character makes him a role model for all. Rosenstock’s detailed storytelling is fast-paced and suspenseful and punctuated with repeated phrasing that will rivet readers to what comes next. Sprinkled throughout the pages are some of Yogi’s famous quotes that endeared him to the world.

Terry Widener knows how to take readers out to the ballgame. His bold, realistic paintings of Yogi scrapping together baseball equipment as a child, working up through the minor league ranks, and finding his groove as a hitter and catcher are loaded with action and up-close perspectives. You can almost hear the characters speak, smell the leather of the catcher’s mitt, and feel the camaraderie of the crowd. And if you instinctively reach for that baseball coming your way, no one can blame you. Throughout the pages, Yogi is outlined in white, emphasizing his standout qualities on the field and off. So, get ready to settle in for the game and one of its most beloved players—no tickets required.

Sure to encourage young readers to reach their full potential no matter their talent, Yogi: The Life, Loves, and Language of Baseball Legend Yogi Berra is a must for home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 7 – 10

Calkins Creek, 2019 | ISBN 978-1629798240

Discover more about Barb Rosenstock and her books on her website.

To learn more about Terry Widener, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Enjoy this Yogi book trailer—it’s a home run!

Yogi Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Calkins Creek in a Twitter giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Yogi: The Life, Loves, and Language of Baseball Legend Yogi Berra written by Barb Rosenstock | illustrated by Terry Widener

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from March 28 through April 3 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on April 4.

Prizing provided by Calkins Creek

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

Baseball Opening Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-baseball-word-search-puzzle

Take Me Out to the Ball Game! Word Search

 

Step up to the plate and find the 23 baseball-related words in this printable puzzle.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game! Puzzle | Take Me Out to the Ball Game! Solution

Check out these other amazing blogs along the tour!

YOGI blog tour graphic

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-yogi-cover

You can find Yogi: The Life, Loves, and Language of Baseball Legend Yogi Berra at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

 

March 25 – It’s National Reading Month and Interview with Illustrator Scott Brundage

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-cover

About the Holiday

No matter whether you live in a house or an apartment, in a city, in a small town, or on a farm, but you can travel anywhere through books. The magic of reading lies in its ability to transport readers through history, into emotional landscapes, and to far-away places – even into outer space as today’s book shows!

Sleeping Bear Press sent me a copy of The First Men Who Went to the Moon to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m excited to be teaming with Sleeping Bear Press in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

The First Men Who Went to the Moon

Written by Rhonda Gowler Greene | Illustrated by Scott Brundage

 

As Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin enter the spacecraft, they wear excited smiles and wave. “These are the first men who went to the Moon.” Panning back to where the enthralled crowd watches from across the water, watch as a rocket roars skyward, trailing flames. “This is the spacecraft, Apollo 11, that lifted off and soared through the heavens / and carried the first men who went to the Moon.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-astronauts

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2019, text copyright Rhonda Gowler Greene, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

The astronauts get a view of Earth as they reach for the blackness of space. The Lunar Module Eagle touches down on the surface of the Moon in “…the Sea of Tranquility / where the astronauts made history….” First Neil Armstrong and then Buzz Aldrin descended onto the Moon carrying an American flag. “This is their mark, a ‘leap for mankind.’ / And this is the flag they left behind / there in the Sea of Tranquility.”

In a spectacular show of human achievement, the Command Module Columbia returned in a “…splashdown that brought them home, / safe and sound from a vast unknown, / where they made their mark, a ‘leap for mankind.’” With ticker tape parades attended by thousands of people, the astronauts were celebrated in New York City and Chicago.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-launch

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2019, text copyright Rhonda Gowler Greene, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

In addition to Rhonda Gowler Green’s poem, many of the double-spread illustration contain facts about the mission, features of the Moon, the astronauts’ work, and splashdown.

Back matter includes information on where the Eagle and Columbia are now; more facts about the mission, the astronauts, and the equipment; resources; and a list of other books for young readers.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-moon

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2019, text copyright Rhonda Gowler Greene, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Mirroring the circular mission that took the astronauts to the Moon and back, Rhonda Gowler Greene’s lyrical verses build on each other, overlapping to create depth in her storytelling and awe in the scientific achievement of NASA in 1969. As the poem reverses, readers engage in the feeling of pride and relief that Americans and people all around the world experienced as they watched Columbia splash down safely into the Pacific Ocean. Greene peppers the story with beautiful images take readers from “swirls of clouds” to a  “desolate land” to “the dust of lunar ground” and helps them recapture the mystery and amazement of those days 50 years ago.

Scott Brundage’s illustrations are remarkable for their detail and ability to transport readers to the heart of the Apollo 11 mission. Today’s children, familiar with satellite images and feeds from space and who have grown up with the International Space Station, cannot fully appreciate with what wonder and trepidation the world watched the mission on television. Choosing a variety of perspectives, Brundage allows kids to watch the rocket launch from the pad in Florida, look out of the spacecraft’s window as the astronauts leave Earth behind, see the Eagle light up the Moon’s surface as it lands, and view Neil Armstrong take that first step onto the Moon. Space lovers will want to linger over every two-page spread to take in all of the minute details as well as the inspiration that space stirs in the dreams of many.

A lyrical and gorgeous tribute to the Apollo 11 mission for its 50th anniversary, The First Men Who Went to the Moon would make a lovely addition to home, classroom, and public library collections for science and space lovers, STEM lessons, and story time.

Ages 6 – 9

Sleeping Bear Press, 2019 | ISBN 978-1585364121

Discover more about Rhonda Gowler Greene and her books on her website.

To learn more about Scott Brundage, his books, his art, and more, visit his website.

You can download and print a fun The First Men Who Went to the Moon Activity Sheet!

Meet Illustrator Scott Brundage

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-scott-brundage-head-shot

Scott Brundage’s work has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Scientific American, the Washington Post, and many others. He is the illustrator of A is for Astronaut: Blasting Through the Alphabet. He lives in New York City.

Today I’m happy to be talking with Scott Brundage about capturing the beauty and mystery of space, his talent for humor, and the surprising start to his art career.

The First Men Who Went to the Moon, written by Rhonda Gowler Greene, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Your illustrations are astounding for their perspective and sense of action that captures the thrill and wonderment of the time. Can you talk about the research you did, how you approached creating these images, and your process?

Well thank you for those generous words about my work. I’m happy people have responded to the illustrations so positively. 

When researching this book, I was lucky enough to have A is for Astronaut fresh in my mind. The Apollo 11 mission is a bit more specific than A is for Astronaut, being a specific time and year, but I’d already learned a lot about how to find good NASA references. 

I faced the same challenge as last time: since NASA’s photography is public domain and already gorgeous, what could I bring to this book that hasn’t been seen already? I couldn’t riff as much as last time, but I could at least try to capture what it might have been like to be in the Apollo 11 crew’s shoes (space boots?). Some illustrations  also were simply trying to capture the emotion that Rhonda Gowler Greene was expressing with her words. The moon is beautiful, but distant, cold and still. I wanted to show all of that if I could.

Which illustration in the book is your favorite and why?

I think the spread on pages 22-23 is my favorite, the one depicting all the footprints in the shadow of the planted flag. I like when I can get away with not quite showing the subject of a painting, but the audience knows what they’re seeing. And without getting too

artsy, I thought it was a good metaphor for the book itself. We went to the moon, left our mark, and came back. The footprints are still there on the cold surface in the shadow of our flag.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-moon-foot-prints

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2019, text copyright Rhonda Gower Greene, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

What were your favorite books as a child and whose art or illustration work did you admire growing up?

I had to ask my mom for this answer. I don’t remember having a favorite, all I could think of are cool picture books I appreciate now as an adult. Turns out, according to my mom, I much preferred to just look through our encyclopedia and then report dinosaur facts to whoever would listen. 

How did you get into illustrating children’s books and what do you enjoy most about the work?

I got into picture books relatively organically, having touched on almost every other type of illustration market first. I started out doing small illustrations for magazines and newspapers. That slowly led me to book covers and middle grade chapter books that had a lot of interior black and white illustration. Along the way, I would help a couple independent authors with their self-published picture books. After a while, I just had a stack of children’s picture book illustrations in my portfolio. So when my agent asked if I was interested in doing a picture book with a real publisher, I was more than ready to jump in. 

Picture books are great because you can really chew on a subject or set of characters way longer than you can for a book cover or spot illustration. I know way more about how space suits work, I’m familiar with a weird number of features on the International Space Station, and know exactly what color suits the Apollo 11 crew were wearing in their ticker tape parade. It’s really fun to get that deep for a book. 

Is it true you got your start professionally by designing a bicycle helmet? How did that come about? What was your design?

This is true. My first paying gig was a Bell Helmet’s kid’s helmet design. My art school instructor, the great children’s book illustrator Brian Biggs, had a contact with the designer at Bell Helmets and set up a contest among his students to submit designs for a possible helmet. They’d pick the winner and see if it could get produced. I send in two designs, one of happy robots on an alien landscape, another of cute little lizards attacking a city. Somehow both designs won the contest  The timing, however, was a little unfortunate for the lizards attacking the city since it was just after 9/11, but the robots ended up adorning the heads of dozens of kids nationwide.

I was fortunate enough to review A is for Astronaut: Blasting through the Alphabet—your picture book with author and former astronaut Clayton Anderson. I was blown away by the stunning details—including spacecraft, the NASA control room, and space itself—on every page. What kinds of choices did you make in creating the illustrations to make the information come alive for kids? 

A is for Astronaut was a blast to work on. I had a bit of freedom in interpreting each chapter, so a lot of it was figuring out I could make an image portray the idea of each letter clearly. For the more straightforward words like galaxy or blastoff, showing how it is to be a kid experiencing those awe-inspiring event/sights for the first time. And, when possible, if I could find a way to blend two words/ideas into a single spread, that was even more fun. 

Your editorial illustrations have appeared in magazines, newspapers, and other publications, and you’re now working as an animator for the Showtime series Our Cartoon President. Do you have a natural knack for humor and infusing it into your art or how did that develop? 

When I was in school, I was really into dark scary artwork and literature. Loved creepy drawings and painting, reading horror stories, listening to dark music. I tried my hand at doing some moody paintings in oil about serious subjects. But, my personality is that of a very silly man. And if you looked at my sketchbooks at the same time, it was all goofy drawings to make myself and others laugh. Eventually I realized I should just lean into what came naturally, and that was the funnier whimsical stuff. I’m definitely much more suited to making a weird face, taking a photo of myself, then applying that face to a character than I am at trying to scare someone.

What’s up next for you?

I’m just starting up a new picture book about a guy and his dog. No astronauts this time around.  

And I’m also working on the second season of Our Cartoon President. 

Thanks, Scott! It’s been so great chatting with you! I wish you all the best with The First Men Who Went to the Moon and all of your work!

You can connect with Scott Brundage on

His website | Twitter | Instagram

The First Men Who Went to the Moon Giveaway

I’m excited to be teaming with Sleeping Bear Press in a giveaway of

  • One (1) copy of The First Men Who Went to the Moon written by Rhonda Gower Greene | illustrated by Scott Brundage

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from March 25 through March 31 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

Prizing provided by Sleeping Bear Press.

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts. 

National Reading Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-rocket-to-the-moon-maze-puzzle

Rocket to the Moon! Maze

 

Help the rocket find its way through space and land on the moon in this printable puzzle!

Rocket to the Moon! Puzzle | Rocket to the Moon! Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-cover

You can find The First Men Who Went to the Moon at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound | Sleeping Bear Books

Picture Book Review

 

March 8 – International Women’s Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-born-to-ride-cover

About the Holiday

Instituted in 1911 and celebrated in Austria, Denmark, Germany, and Switzerland, International Women’s Day was recognized by the United Nations in 1975. In 1996, honoring the holiday under a united theme was established and this tradition has been followed ever since. During the 100th anniversary of International Woman’s Day in 2011, President Barak Obama proclaimed March to be National Women’s Month. Both International Women’s Day and National Women’s Month recognize the accomplishments and contributions of women throughout history and today. This year’s theme is Balance for Better and raises awareness of the need for gender equity across the spectrum of education, business, government, media coverage, rights, wealth, and more. The outreach and influence of International Women’s Day continues throughout the year. To learn more and get involved, visit the International Women’s Day website.

Abrams Books for Young Readers sent me a copy of Born to Ride to check out. All opinions are my own. 

Born to Ride: A Story about Bicycle Face

Written by Larissa Theule | Illustrated by Kelsey Garrity-Riley

 

Open the cover of this remarkable picture book to a two-page illustration and you might notice something unusual—for our time. What is it? Read on and see…

As Louisa Belinda Bellflower gazed out her window at a man riding a bicycle in Rochester, New York, in 1896, she wished that she could ride one too. But girls and women weren’t allowed to ride bicycles, just as they weren’t allowed to vote or wear pants. Louisa’s brother, Joe, had a brand-new bike, and “riding it looked like a whole lot of fun.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-born-to-ride-falling

Image copyright Kelsey Garrity-Riley, 2019, text copyright Larissa Theule, 2019. Courtesy of Abrams Books for Young People.

One day, Louisa took off her frilly skirt and put on her brother’s pants and asked him to teach her how to ride. There were, however, a couple of concerns. One was what would their mother say? Another was the horrible medical condition, bicycle face. Everyone knew about it, and Doctor Brown was strict on this matter. He said, “‘girls aren’t strong enough to balance, that your eyes will bulge, and your jaw will close up from the strain of trying—maybe FOREVER.’”

Louisa considered this fate, but Joe didn’t have any of these symptoms. Even though she was a little nervous, she tried it anyway. Louisa fell again and again, but when Joe asked her if she wanted to quit, she continued. She began peddling again and soon had the knack for it. “With some alarm, she felt her eyes bulge, and her mouth widen—into a gigantic, joyous smile.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-born-to-ride-tea

Image copyright Kelsey Garrity-Riley, 2019, text copyright Larissa Theule, 2019. Courtesy of Abrams Books for Young People.

She rode back and forth down the path and when she got home, her mother said, “‘those pants look quite practical, Louisa Belinda,’” And Louisa turned a somersault just to show her she was right. Then Louisa’s mother asked Joe if Father’s bike was in good shape. Joe said it was, and their mother set about converting her skirt into a pair of pants. When they were finished, Louisa and her mother wheeled the bikes out side-by-side and took off. “‘Mother,’” Louisa said, “‘what will your bicycle face be, I wonder!’”

You only need to turn the page to see. Louisa’s mother is smiling and that original two-page spread has been transformed with lots of women and girls riding the roads that lead to the Votes for Women rally in the town green.

An extensive Author’s Note follows the text and explains the origin of “bicycle face” and other such imagined bicycle-related maladies as well as the opposition to women’s riding bicycles. Also included is a discussion on the women’s suffrage movement.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-born-to-ride-sewing

Image copyright Kelsey Garrity-Riley, 2019, text copyright Larissa Theule, 2019. Courtesy of Abrams Books for Young People.

Both children and adult readers will be astounded at Larissa Theule’s eye-opening story that reveals just one of the many obstacles women have had to overcome in their quest for equal rights. Theule’s story, told through the eyes of a girl with pluck and self-confidence, is well targeted to her young audience with an engaging undercurrent of humor at the nonsensical reasoning behind the ban on women’s bicycle riding and even the constricting clothing of the time for girls and boys. As Louisa falls again and again while learning to ride, Theule infuses her story with the idea that perseverance wins out—a concept she not only applies to learning a new skill, but to the parallel story of women’s suffrage that runs throughout the illustrations.

Kelsey Garrity-Riley’s charming illustrations evoke the late 1800s, giving kids a view of history with Victorian-style houses; skirts, bloomers, and pinafores for girls and short-pant suits for boys; and an old-fashioned sewing machine. Adding depth and context to the story, Garrity-Riley follows Louisa and Joe’s mother as she paints “Votes for Women” and “Ballots for Both” signs and later hosts a women’s suffrage tea attended by white and dark-skinned women, a woman in a wheelchair, and one progressive man. Garrity-Riley cleverly combines images of Louisa’s indomitable spirit with these depictions of protest to reinforce the theme and lesson of the story.

To  jumpstart discussions about equal rights for all, Born to Ride: A Story about Bicycle Face is a unique and fascinating addition to home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 8

Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2019 | ISBN 978-1419734120

Discover more about Larissa Theule and her books on her website.

To learn more about Kelsey Garrity-Riley, her books, and her art, visit her website.

International Women’s Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bicycle-maze 2

Ride with Me! Maze

 

Two girls want to ride bikes together. Can you help them find each other in this printable maze?

Ride with Me! Puzzle | Ride with Me! Puzzle Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-born-to-ride-cover

You can find Born to Ride: A Story about Bicycle Face at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 6 – National Dress Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-along-came-coco-cover

About the Holiday

Instituted by Ashley Lauren in 2016, the day encourages people to relive and celebrate their best dress memories. It’s also a day to honor those designers who design the styles that create a splash, feel comfortable, and make a statement. To celebrate today, get together with friends and talk about your favorite dress memories then go shopping and get ready to make some more!

Abrams sent me a copy of Along Came Coco to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be partnering with Abrams in a giveaway of the book. Details are below.

Along Came Coco: A Story about Coco Chanel

By Eva Byrne

 

Coco Chanel, born in 1883, grew up in an orphanage, “a strict convent tucked away in the French countryside.” While the girls wore identical uniforms and followed the nuns’ rules, Coco always found a way to be herself: when she learned how to sew, she used her creativity to make dolls for her friends, and each night as she brushed her curly hair the required one-hundred times, she vowed that when she grew up she’d cut her hair short.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-along-came-coco-orphanage

Copyright Eva Byrne, 2019, courtesy of Abrams Books for Young Readers.

Sometimes Coco was allowed to visit her grandparents in Moulins and her Aunt Louise in Varennes. During these trips she saw fashionable ladies strolling through the city and watched her aunt transform simple hats into fabulous creations. Coco wanted to make hats too. As soon as she was grown, she said au revoir to the convent and opened a hat shop. Then she began making clothing inspired by the sights all around her. She especially liked the “stripy tops of the local fisherman” and “sewed her own version.”

In 1914, Coco opened in the beachside town of Deauville. The summer was hot, and Coco created a stylish and cooler bathing suit so women could enjoy the shore. “She was one of the first designers who knew exactly what women wanted.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-along-came-coco-boutique

Copyright Eva Byrne, 2019, courtesy of Abrams Books for Young Readers.

Soon she had a waiting list of women who wanted to wear her designs. She converted men’s fashions into stylish clothes for women and was the first to add pockets to women’s outfits. Her clothing was so popular that she was able to buy an entire building in Paris to sell her dresses, hats, and jewelry. She enjoyed the theater and opera, and one night as she was getting ready to go out, a gas lamp exploded. Her dress was ruined and her hair was burned. Coco was not about to miss the opera, so she cut her long hair short and discovered that it framed her face in a most delightful way.

But what would she wear? She cut and sewed a new evening gown that broke all the rules—it had no corset. “And with every stitch, Coco changed the way women dressed forever.” Her dress was black, simple, and elegant, without all the frills and poofs of the dresses of the time. “Coco dreamed that all women should have a black dress.” And thus the “little black dress was born” and women’s fashions and lifestyle changed forever.

An Author’s Note and more information on Coco Chanel, her life, and work follow the text.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-along-came-coco-sewing

Copyright Eva Byrne, 2019, courtesy of Abrams Books for Young Readers.

Eva Byrne weaves a fascinating biography of Coco Chanel that reveals the early influences and experiences that informed her creativity. Byrne infuses her text with Coco’s precocious spirit through examples of her dreams of the future, good-natured “rule breaking,” and fashion innovations. Coco’s natural talent, modern vision, and confidence to buck the system are all evident in Byrne’s engaging storytelling that will have kids marveling over women’s fashions of the time and appreciating Coco’s contributions not only to women’s clothing choices but to the way they lived. The story of how the first little black dress came to be will amaze both children and adults.

From the beginning of the book, where a pair of hands stitch the name Coco onto the title page, to the end, where Coco, needle and thread in hand, winks at the reader, Byrne treats kids to beautiful illustrations of Coco, her surroundings, and her fashions. Her fresh, vivid watercolors are light and airy as they take readers down French boulevards and to the beach. Readers will love lingering over the pages to study the styles of the time and how Coco’s designs stood out as revolutionary. Removing the gilded casewrap reveals a stunning canal-side landscape and the inspiration for Chanel’s famous striped look.

A superb book for kids who love fashion and fashion students as well as readers interested in history, the arts, biographies, and a well-told story, Along Came Coco makes an excellent gift and exciting addition to home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 8

Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2019 | ISBN 978-1419734250

To learn more about Eva Byrne and see a gallery of her artwork, visit her website.

Along Came Coco Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Abrams Books for Young Readers in giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Along Came Coco: A Story about Coco Chanel, by Eva Byrne

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from March 6 through March 12 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on March 13.

Prizing provided by Abrams.

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts. 

National Dress Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-hanging-on-fashion-word-search-puzzle

Hanging on Fashion Word Search Puzzle

 

Fashion design has its own special vocabulary. Can you find the twenty fashion-related words in this printable puzzle?

Hanging on Fashion Word Search Puzzle | Hanging on Fashion Word Search Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-along-came-coco-cover

You can find Along Came Coco at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review