June 14 -It’s National Camping Month

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About the Holiday

June is the perfect month to explore the great outdoors up close through camping. Whether you enjoy pitching a tent, renting a cabin, or parking an RV, all the enjoyment of hiking, fishing, swimming, and of course toasting marshmallows and singing around the campfire await! 

Digger and Daisy Go Camping

Written by Judy Young | Illustrated by Dana Sullivan

 

Summer vacation has come and Digger and Daisy are packing up for another adventure together. At least Daisy is. She’s excited to go camping, “but Digger is worried. There might be bears,” he thinks. With reassurance from Daisy that the trip will be fun, Digger fills his own backpack and grabs his sleeping bag. Out on the trail, “There is a noise. Digger hears it. He looks all around. He is worried. ‘I hear a bear!’ says Digger.”

Daisy points out that “bears growl” and the sound Digger hears is just a bird singing in a tree. Digger and Daisy sing along too all the way to the lake. Here there’s another noise that worries Digger. “‘I hear a bear!’” he tells Daisy. But this sound is just a fish jumping, and soon Daisy and Digger are splashing along with it. After a nice swim, Daisy thinks a fire will warm them up. While they’re picking up sticks, Digger hears another noise that he’s sure is a bear. But this sound isn’t a growl either. It’s a squirrel munching on nuts.

Digger and Daisy enjoy roasted nuts too along with their hot dogs and marshmallows. “‘It will be dark soon,’ says Daisy. ‘We need to put up the tent.’” Daisy feels safe and cozy in her sleeping bag, but Digger hears a noise. “He looks all around. He is worried. ‘I hear a bear!’ says Digger.” But this sound isn’t a growl—Daisy tells him it’s a howl from the wind.

Daisy quickly falls asleep, but Digger doesn’t. He listens to all the sounds and recognizes the wind, a jumping fish, and the hoot of an owl. Satisfied, “Digger closes his eyes. Soon he is sound asleep.” Suddenly, there is a noise that Digger does not hear. It wakes Daisy. She shines her flashlight all around. “She is worried. ‘Digger, wake up! I hear a bear!’ says Daisy.” When Digger opens his eyes, the sound stops. Is a bear on their trail, or was it something a little tamer?

In their seventh adventure, Daisy plans an overnight camping trip. Daisy’s protective older-sibling instincts are sweetly in evidence as she encourages Digger to put his fear of bears aside and join her. Once in the forest, she reassures him that the noises he hears are harmless woodland creatures. Kids will love catching up with their favorite canine duo through Judy Young’s simple sentences that contain enough repetition of key words to bolster early readers’ confidence as well as accumulative drama, gentle suspense, and a humorous ending.

Every camping trip is filled with moments of wonder and humor, and Digger and Daisy’s adventure is no exception. In Dana Sullivan’s colorful snapshots, the birds are singing, butterflies flutter along, a gymnastic fish startles a fly, and a squirrel stuffs its cheeks with nuts. Daisy sports her trademark tutu skirt (even her bathing suit is a one-piece tutu), and Digger has not forgotten his favorite cap. Young readers will giggle as Digger panics, sending his firewood flying, and gets tied up in the tent ropes. They’ll also appreciate Sullivan’s cleverness in making Daisy and Digger’s tent look like a red doghouse. Of course, the siblings’ loving relationship is a highlight of this series, and this story strengthens that bond as Daisy takes care of her little brother and he in turn trusts her.

Fans of Digger and Daisy will want to add this new adventure to their collection. Digger and Daisy Go Camping also makes a sweet introduction to the series and will entice readers who have not yet met this brother and sister team to explore all of their escapades. The book would make a welcome addition to classroom and public library shelves as well.

Ages 5 – 7

Sleeping Bear Press, 2019 | ISBN 978-1534110229

Discover more about Judy Young and her books on her website.

To learn more about Dana Sullivan, his books, and his art, visit her website.

National Camping Month Activitycelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-canoe-maze

Come Canoeing With Us Maze

 

These campers want to canoe together but first they must pick up their friend from the center of the lake. They need your help navigating their way in this printable puzzle.

Come Canoeing With Us Maze Puzzle |  Come Canoeing With Us Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-digger-and-daisy-go-camping

You can find Digger and Daisy Go Camping at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 7 – It’s Pet Appreciation Week

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About the Holiday

Pets give us so much love and joy that we often want to do something special for our furry friends in return. The first full week of June gives us the opportunity to show our pets how much we appreciate them! Why not spend a little extra time walking or cuddling with your pet? Or maybe make them a favorite treat or get them a new toy. Another way to show how much our pets mean to us is to schedule a regular check-up to make sure they’re healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations. However you celebrate, you know your pet will appreciate it!

Lola Gets a Cat

Written by Anna McQuinn | illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw

 

Lola loved cats, and while she had a room full of stuffed cats in all colors and sizes, she wanted a real kitten of her own. Her mother told her that “looking after a cat is a lot of work.” Lola wanted to learn more, so Mommy took her to the library to get a book about cats. Lola learned lots of interesting information about cats and how to take care of them.

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Image copyright Rosalind Beardshaw, 2017, text copyright Anna McQuinn. Courtesy of Charlesbridge.

Lola decided to pretend that Dinah, one of her stuffed kitties, was real. She made a special bed for Dinah from a shoe box and blanket. She made a chart and checked off when she fed, bathed, and played with Dinah. Mommy saw what a good job Lola did with Dinah and agreed that Lola could have a cat. First, Lola and Mommy went to the computer to “find out how to adopt one.” Then they went to the animal shelter where Jeremy showed “them three perfect cats.”

Lola looked at the orange tabby, the black cat who was napping, and the playful gray ball of fluff. Even before Lola made her choice, the little gray one chose her! Jeremy gave Lola a list of all the things she’d need at home to make the little kitten feel comfortable and happy. The next day, Lola and Mommy went shopping at the pet store, and Lola and Daddy set up a special corner in the house with the cat’s toys and bed.

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Image copyright Rosalind Beardshaw, 2017, text copyright Anna McQuinn. Courtesy of Charlesbridge.

Finally, everything was ready. Lola and Mommy went back to the shelter. The kitten was afraid to go into the carrier at first, but including her own blanket made her feel safe. At home, Lola watched her new kitten explore her corner and new things. Lola named her cat Makeda, “the name of an African queen.” Every day, Lola took “excellent care of Makeda.”

Lola’s friend Ty was excited to meet Makeda and even brought her a present. Makeda now feels at home—especially when she’s cuddling with Lola! At night Lola reads a story to Makeda before bedtime. She loves Makeda, and reading to her “is the best of all.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-lola-gets-a-cat-daddy

Image copyright Rosalind Beardshaw, 2017, text copyright Anna McQuinn. Courtesy of Charlesbridge.

Anna McQuinn’s little Lola is loved by young readers for her curiosity, gentle nature, and can-do spirit. Lola’s sweet personality overflows in this story as she decides that she’d like a pet and then demonstrates to her mommy and daddy that she understands the responsibility. Through her charming storytelling, McQuinn invites little readers to be part of Lola and Makeda’s journey and share in their warm friendship. Lola’s supportive parents offer guidance but allow Lola to thoughtfully make her own decisions and show what she can accomplish.

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Throughout her colorful illustrations, Rosalind Beardshaw’s Lola shows intelligence, self-confidence, and pride as she practices tending for a cat, learns about cat behavior and care, listens to the animal shelter manager, and gets everything ready for her new cat. Detailed images realistically depict the items a cat requires, a bit of the procedure of adopting a shelter cat, how to give a new pet space to assimilate into their new environment, and a good example of a pet-care chart, giving those contemplating a new pet a good primer for children. The quiet joy that infuses each page, makes Lola and Makeda  perfect companions for little readers.

Whether new to the Lola series, adding to a collection, or looking for a character and story a little one will fall in love with, you’ll find that Lola Gets a Cat is perfectly at home on family and classroom bookshelves.

Ages 2 – 5

Charlesbridge, 2017 | ISBN 978-1580897365 (Hardcover) | ISBN 978-1580897365 (Paperback)

Discover more about Anna McQuinn and her books on her website.

To learn more about Rosalind Beardshaw, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Kids and Pets Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-match-the-kittens-puzzle

Match the Kittens Puzzle

 

These kittens all have a twin, but they got mixed up while playing! Can you find the pairs again in this printable Match the Kittens Puzzle?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-lola-gets-a-cat-cover

You can find Lola Gets a Cat at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

Picture Book Review

June 6 – National Great Outdoors Month

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About the Holiday

Getting outside is one of the joys of summer, but with all the fun games to play and not-so-fun-but-necessary chores to do inside, sometimes a day, a week, or even the whole summer can go by without your ever really getting to enjoy the sunshine, fresh air, and outdoor activities As schools close, leaving more time for leisure pursuits, make sure to take the opportunity of this month-long holiday to plan some time to explore the great outdoors through hiking, biking, swimming, camping, and just plain playing. 

Bear Out There

By Jacob Grant

 

While Bear had tea, Spider was showing him the kite he had made. “He was very excited to fly it out in the yard.” Spider loved everything about the outdoors—the sun, the gentle breeze, the plants, and even the bugs. Bear loved everything about staying indoors. He was looking forward to cleaning up his house and having another cup of tea.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bear-out-there-new-kite

Copyright Jacob Grant, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

But then Spider’s kite took off on its own and because Bear was a good friend, he said he would help look for it. But he reminded Spider: “…you know I do not like the forest.” In fact, Bear did not like anything about the forest—the “filthy ground…the itchy plants…the pesky bugs.” Spider, on the other hand, thought a search through the forest would be fun.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bear-out-there-heading-out

Copyright Jacob Grant, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

As they walked, Bear grumbled and complained about the fragrant weeds, the noisy owls, and all the other “unpleasant” things all around them. They had still not found the kite when it started to rain. Now, not even Spider was having a good time, and Bear was more miserable than before. “‘Surely this search cannot get any worse!’ he said. But it could.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bear-out-there-waterfall

Copyright Jacob Grant, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Bear gave up. He was ready to go home and have a cup of tea in his comfy chair. But then he saw Spider sitting on a rock. Rain drops splashed off his tiny button hat and he looked bedraggled and disappointed. Bear relented. “‘Maybe we could look just a little farther,’” he said. Spider was happy just to be with Bear.

The rain lessened and Bear and Spider looked up at the clearing sky. There, stuck in the branch of a tree, was Spider’s kite. Back home, they soaked in a hot bath, patched the rips in Spider’s kite, made one for Bear, and, of course, had tea—which they enjoyed while flying their kites from Bear’s comfy chair out in the yard.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bear-out-there-kite-found

Copyright Jacob Grant, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Jacob Grant’s seemingly odd-couple friendship between a big black bear and an itty-bitty spider is as charming and comforting as it gets. While Spider loves the outdoors, Bear is a homebody; but when his friend needs help, Bear puts his own feelings aside to help. It doesn’t take long—only one page, in fact—for Bear to give up the tidy day he had planned for a tromp through the woods in search of Spider’s lost kite. As the hunt grows long and conditions worsen, Bear begins to grumble until he finally gives up. Again, though, one glance at disappointed Spider spurs him on to continue the search. And for Spider, just having Bear by his side makes things all right.

The dynamics between Bear and Spider are pitch perfect, mirroring the love and trust between parents and kids, best friends, teachers and students, and other adult-child pairs. A story isn’t a real story without change, and here, too, Grant offers an inspiring truism. The final scene in which Bear and Spider both enjoy flying kites while sipping tea and lounging in Bear’s chair shows the joy of sharing and embracing another’s favorite activity.

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Copyright Jacob Grant, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Grant’s gentle, soft-hued illustrations are full of meaning and humor, of the forest’s allure that Bear doesn’t see, and of Spider’s feelings that he does. Although Bear is a neat-freak—scrubbing, dusting, and sweeping—he’s careful to leave Spider’s resting spots intact. In the woods, Bear grumbles about the smells, the noise, and the general unpleasantness while readers see a beautiful bouquet of flowers, a topsy-turvy turn of events in an owl’s nest, and a scenic panorama complete with waterfall and butterflies. Coming back to their home with its inviting pink teapot and orange chairs is the perfect antidote to any busy or stressful day.

Bear Out There is an endearing read and would be a welcome addition to home, classroom, and public library bookshelves for its sweet depiction of what true friendship between adults and kids or among children is all about. Readers won’t want to miss Jacob Grant’s first Bear and Spider adventure, Bear’s Scare.

Ages 3 – 6

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1681197456

To learn more about Jacob Grant, his books, and his art, visit his website.

National Great Outdoors Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-let's-go-scooter-maze

Let’s Go! Maze

 

These four friends want to ride their scooters together. Can you help the girls find their way along the path to the boys?

Let’s Go! Maze | Let’s Go! Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bear-out-there-cover

You can find Bear Out There at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 5 – Global Running Day

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About the Holiday

Global Running Day is all about living a healthy lifestyle! There are so many reasons to take up running, from keeping in shape to clearing one’s mind to competing against other runners. The evolution of National Running Day, which was established in 2009, Global Running Day allows serious runners to recommit to their sport and encourages those on the fence to jump down and join in. This year people from 156 countries have pledged to run short distances and longer routes in their quest for personal health. An accompanying Million Kid Run gets young people thinking about their own health while having fun. Participating is as easy as running in your neighborhood, gathering with friends to run, or even playing tag with your kids. To learn more about the day visit the Global Running Day website!  

The Girl Who Ran: Bobbi Gibb, the First Woman to Run the Boston Marathon

Written by Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee | Illustrated by Susanna Chapman

 

“Bobbi loved to run. Into the woods, over the hills, through fields and by streams, Bobbi’s feet flew across the earth.” When Bobbi was little, she and her friends ran and played together. But as they grew older, her friends found other pursuits while Bobbi still loved to run. She took to the fields with her dogs, “going higher and higher, / just her and the sound of the wind in the fire.”

When Bobbi was grown, her father took her to watch the Boston Marathon. She loved the camaraderie of “hundreds of people moving as one. Kindred spirits, all running miles together.” Immediately, she wanted to participate too. When Bobbi told her parents that she wanted to run in the marathon, however, they thought her idea was strange. They told her she would hurt herself and that it was unladylike.

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Image copyright Susanna Chapman, 2017, text copyright, Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee, 2017. Courtesy of Compendium.

But Bobbie wanted to run. She didn’t know if she could run that far but was determined to try. She trained in the woods, running “further and further, and she ached and perspired, / and the world whooshed on by, like the wind in the fire.” Because she knew her parents disapproved, Bobbi set out on her own across country to train. Every day she ran in a new place—“lush forests in Ohio and Indiana, vast plains in Nebraska and Kansas, majestic mountains in Wyoming and Montana.” She even ran with wild horses out west and up steep Rocky Mountain trails. At night she camped, “tired and happy.”

All of her training seemed for nothing, however, when Bobbi received a letter rejecting her application for the Boston Marathon. The letter said that women were incapable of running marathons, that it was against the rules for a woman to run, and that the rules had been written to protect women from injury. Bobbi was not deterred, however. She went back home and told her parents what she wanted to do. Her father thought she was crazy to attempt it.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-ran-woods

Image copyright Susanna Chapman, 2017, text copyright, Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee, 2017. Courtesy of Compendium.

Bobbi knew that the only way she could run would be “to blend in with the men.” Dressed in men’s shorts and a baggy hooded sweatshirt to hide her hair and wearing men’s running shoes (running shoes were not made for women), Bobbi was ready to go. Her father refused to drive her to the race, though. He stormed out of the house, and drove away. Bobbi thought her dream was dashed until her mom came to her room, car keys in hand, and said, “‘Let’s go.”

Hiding in the bushes at the starting line, she sprang out and joined the pack of runners with the bang of the starting pistol. “So she ran with the pack, going higher and higher, / the world whooshing by, like the wind in the fire.” As she ran, she realized that the men around her had seen through her disguise. Bobbi was worried, but the men were supportive. “‘Hey! Are you running the whole way?’ one asked.” She told him she hoped to, but in that sweatshirt, she was getting hotter and hotter. She was afraid that if she took it off, she’d be thrown out of the race.

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Image copyright Susanna Chapman, 2017, text copyright, Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee, 2017. Courtesy of Compendium.

The men around her said they wouldn’t let that happen, so Bobbi took off the sweatshirt. “Word spread quickly throughout the course. A girl was running! They couldn’t believe it!” All along the route, the crowd cheered and encouraged her. Hearing the roar motivated Bobbi to ignore the hard ground and her stiff shoes and face the last steep hill. “Closing her eyes, she imagined she was back in Montana running up the mountains, the soft earth under her feet.”

Her feet were blistered and she was parched with thirst, but she crossed the finish line—ahead of nearly half of the men. Photographers, reporters, and radio presenters swarmed around her to hear her history-making story. From that day on “hearts and minds were forever changed.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-ran-young-Boston-marathon-all-men

Image copyright Susanna Chapman, 2017, text copyright, Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee, 2017. Courtesy of Compendium.

The story of Bobbi Gibb is one that every girl and boy should know, and Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee’s excellent biography will have readers awe-struck by how she changed the way the world viewed women and their capabilities. A pioneer for women’s rights in every way—from her traveling the country alone to rejecting the prevailing ideas to competing on her own terms—Bobbi Gibb is an inspiration for achievers everywhere. Poletti and Yee’s conversational storytelling is both lyrical and honest, not stinting on the obstacles Bobbi had to overcome, including race officials, her own parents, and even the fact that running shoes weren’t made for women.

As the marathon approaches, readers will be enthralled by the building suspense. They’ll feel Bobbi’s determination, her disappointment, and her fear that she will be discovered and thrown out of the race, and will cheer along with the crowd at her victory.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-ran-crowds

Image copyright Susanna Chapman, 2017, text copyright, Frances Poletti and Kristina Yee, 2017. Courtesy of Compendium.

Susanna Chapman’s gorgeous illustrations are infused with Bobbi’s boundless energy and spirit as she soars over grassy dunes with her dogs at her heels, zips through shady woods, and runs alongside wild horses in the shadow of the Rockies all the while trailing a red swish, representative of the fire within her. The turmoil surrounding Bobbi’s desire to run the Boston Marathon is depicted in words of rebuke, recrimination, and rejection printed in large, emphatic typefaces that swirl around her like a tornado.

The inclusion of the image of Bobbi’s mother with the car keys in hand on the morning of the race is a welcome reminder of the many unknown women of earlier generations who  contributed to the fight for women’s equality. A beautiful double gate-fold illustration of Bobbi crossing the finish line to cheering crowds and the waiting media puts the focus fully on Bobbi and the fire that spurred her on.

An Afterword tells more about Bobbi Gibb, and a timeline of seminal events in the Boston Marathon from 1896 to today, is a fascinating must-read.

The Girl Who Ran is an inspirational biography and revealing history from the not-so-distant past that offers encouragement and triumph. It would be a wonderful addition to home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 8 – 12

Compendium, 2017 | ISBN 978-1943200474

Discover more about Kristina Yee, her books, and her films on her website

Learn more about Susanna Chapman, her books, and her art on her website

Global Running Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pioneering-women-in-sports-puzzle

Pioneering Women in Sports Word Scramble Puzzle

 

In every sport there have been women who have overcome barriers, incredible odds, set records, and inspired others. Using the clues and a little research, can you unscramble the names of these twelve awesome athletes?

Pioneering Women in Sports Word ScramblePioneering Women in Sports Word Scramble Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-ran-cover

You can find The Girl Who Ran at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 23 – It’s Mystery Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-betty's-burgled-bakery-cover

About the Holiday

The month of May is dedicated to mysteries! Established ten years ago by Booklist, part of the American Library Association, Mystery Month highlights all things mysterious and offers webinars, articles, awards, recommendations and more! Mysteries, with their unusual situations, puzzling clues, suspect suspects, and plenty of unexplained phenomena, are great for getting kids—even reluctant readers—to fall in love with books. With so many classic and new mysteries to investigate, this month’s celebration may just last all summer! And if you like your mysteries funny, you’ll love today’s book!

Betty’s Burgled Bakery: An Alliterative Adventure

By Travis Nichols

 

“Ahoy!” Antoine hails the caller to the control center when the red alert button lights up. He listens carefully as Betty the Panda describes the crime. “A bread bandit burgled by bakery before breakfast!” It seemed her “counters and cupboards were completely cleared of carrot cake, cornbread, and crackers. This is a considerable crummy crime,” she sums up with aptly punny indignation.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-betty's-burgled-bakery-call-in

Copyright Travis Nichols, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Antoine is immediately on the case, calling in his detectives from their various pursuits to “dutifully deal with [the] distressing dilemma.” When they arrive at Betty’s Bakery, she shows them the empty shelves and is assured that they will “find the fully fed, fiendish foe.” The detectives fan out across the store and are surprised that anyone could have broken in without tripping the powerful security system.

Josie believes the “key to catching this kitchen crook” is in examining what they left behind—namely the “kale crumpets” and a cash register full of money. The gumshoes have been so hard at work trying to crack the case that Quentin has gone to the market next door and brought back snacks to sustain them. Everyone digs in, except Betty who’s “in need of nary a nibble.” When Morgan the chicken is finished with his snack, he inquires whether perhaps Betty didn’t hear something since she lives right above the bakery. But Betty, it seems, is a deep sleeper and heard nothing.  

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-betty's-burgled-bakery-Gumshoe-Zoo-control-board

Copyright Travis Nichols, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Antoine looks around and has a quick question for Quentin about how long he thinks it would take to “acquire this quantity of baked goods.” Josie notices that the racks are so high that “no runt could ransack this room.” Meanwhile, Steve the monkey has discovered a clue. He thinks they could track the tooth marks in a tasty tart.

Steve is just about to match the distinctive notch in the half-eaten cookie to one sharp tooth in a snoozing Betty’s lower jaw when…swipe!…Betty grabs the cookie and gobbles it up. The detectives look on in astonishment. “Sleepwalking?” suggests Mike the bull. “Sleep eating,” corrects Josie. Just then Betty wakes up to see all the detectives staring at her, ready to solve the case.

Copyright Travis Nichols, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Copyright Travis Nichols, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

“You yearn for sleep, yes?” asks Steve. Sharon, the duck reminds Betty that she last ate yesterday, yet she wanted no snack, and Quentin reveals, “you ate your yield of yummies yourself.” Betty’s surprised… astounded… asleep! But the Gumshoe Zoo has a bit of celebrating to do since they “zipped this zany, zigzagging zinger with zeal! The press celebrates them too with an article in the 1000% True News. But what’s this on Page 2? A valuable painting has been stolen! It seems there’s a new case for the Gumshoe Zoo to solve!

Notes about alliteration and some very hungry animals follow the text.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-betty's-burgled-bakery-g-words

Copyright Travis Nichols, 2017, courtesy of Chronicle Books.

Travis Nichols’ witty alliterative alphabetic mystery will have little ones giggling at the zany language and big words that trip off the Gumshoe Zoo detectives’ tongues, while adults will laugh along and shake their head in appreciation of the clever construction of the story. Detective-story tropes, including the round-up of detectives caught in the middle of chores or play, a clueless member of the team, and the locked-room mystery, add to the fun. The panel illustrations set a quick pace for the investigation and clearly show the objects or ideas being alliteratively alluded to to boost younger readers’ understanding.

Betty’s Burgled Bakery will be a favorite of little linguists-in-the-making as well as for mystery lovers. It’s a book that will be asked for again and again. It makes a fun and unique addition to home bookshelves and a terrific English or writing lesson lead-in for classrooms.

Ages 4 – 8

Chronicle Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1452131832

Learn more about Travis Nichols, his books, and his art on his website

Mystery Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bake-up-some-fun-word-search

Bake up Some Fun! Word Search Puzzle

 

Before this pan goes into the oven, can you find the eighteen baking-related words in this printable word search puzzle?

Bake up Some Fun! Word Search PuzzleBake up Some Fun! Word Search Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-betty's-burgled-bakery-cover

Betty’s Burgled Bakery can be found at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 20 – National Pick Strawberries Day

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About the Holiday

In warmer climates the strawberries are ready to be picked, ushering in one of the delights of summer. For those who live in cooler regions, the fun of going strawberry picking and the delicious treats to follow are being eagerly looked forward to. Strawberries are grown in all parts of the world except for the most frigid areas and are enjoyed alone or in delectable desserts, salads, and other recipes To celebrate today, pick some strawberries—at a farm, in your own garden, or at the market—and enjoy!

The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear

Written by Don and Audrey Wood | Illustrated by Don Wood

 

It’s quite curious what Mouse is doing with that ladder at this time of day. In fact, it might be worth asking. “Hello little Mouse. What are you doing?” Ah! It seems that beyond the hammock and the huge gnarled tree, there’s a strawberry plant. And on that strawberry plant is an enormous strawberry. Mouse seems very pleased with himself that he’s found it and has the ladder set up to pick it.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-mouse-the-red-ripe-strawberry-and-the-big-hungry-bear-oops

Copyright Don Wood, 1984, courtesy of Child’s Play.

But there is some disturbing news. Even though Mouse is half way up the ladder, it might just be good to ask if he’s heard about “the big hungry Bear.” His shocked reaction would say he hasn’t. Maybe it would be good to emphasize just “Ohhh, how that Bear loves red, ripe strawberries.” The Mouse wants to protect his find, but there’s no time to lose. After all that Bear “can smell a red, ripe strawberry a mile away….”

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Copyright Don Wood, 1984, courtesy of Child’s Play.

Oh! The Mouse already has the strawberry off the stem. Well, this does pose a problem. You see, that only helps the Bear smell it more easily. Run, little Mouse! That Bear will soon be tromping through the forest on his huge feet with his huge appetite and find that strawberry. Burying it won’t help. Putting it under lock and key won’t help. And there’s no disguise the Bear can’t see through.

In fact… “There’s only one way in the whole wide world to save a red, ripe strawberry from a hungry Bear!” That’s right, so…get a knife… and… “cut it in two.” Then “share half with me. And we’ll both eat it all up!” And the Bear? Well, he’ll have to find another red, ripe strawberry.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-mouse-the-red-ripe-strawberry-and-the-big-hungry-bear-eating

Copyright Don Wood, 1984, courtesy of Child’s Play.

This classic story by Don and Audrey Wood was a favorite in my house and continues to excite gasps and giggles in kids today. The enticing storyline, teased along through innocent-sounding questions and “helpful” suggestions, leads to a twist ending that begs the question: Was there ever really a bear? Young readers will be thrilled to discover that they, too, get to share in that delicious red, ripe strawberry.

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Don Wood’s pleased-as-punch, surprised, worried, hurried, and ultimately satisfied Mouse is the star of the story and as cute as his readers, although the strawberry, dressed up in a glasses-and-moustache disguise, may get the biggest guffaw. The forest, with its gnarled trees and overhanging vegetation, offers a suspenseful obstacle course for the fleeing Mouse, and the Mouse’s home is a cozy spot for a snack.

A perfect book to jump-start gardening with kids, as a take-along on outings, as a lead-in to snack time, or for any spirited story time at home or in the classroom, The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear is a perennial charmer.

Ages 2 – 5

Child’s Play, 1984 | ISBN 978-0859530125 (Paperback); 978-0859531825 (Hardcover, 1997); 978-1846434037 (Board book, 1998); 978-1846434051 (English/Spanish edition, 2011)

To learn more about Don and Audrey Wood and their books and find activities, secrets, and more, visit their website.

National Pick Strawberries Day Activity

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Let’s Go Strawberry Picking! Matching Puzzle

 

It’s strawberry-picking day! Can you match pairs of strawberries before you put them in the basket in this printable Let’s Go Strawberry Picking! Matching Puzzle.

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You can find The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 10 – National Hamster Day

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About the Holiday

Cute, furry, friendly, and small, the hamster may be one of the best pets around! These inquisitive little ones love to explore, and the way they wash their tiny noses is adorable. Easy to care for and a fun to play with, either maneuvering a maze, rolling around in a plastic ball, or running on a concave disk roll, a hamster makes a great addition to a family or classroom. This month we also celebrate National Pet Month. If you’re considering getting a pet, check out the hamsters at your local pet shop or animal shelter.

I received a copy of Tip and Tucker: Road Trip for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Sleeping Bear Press in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Tip and Tucker: Road Trip

Written by Ann Ingalls and Sue Lowell Gallion | Illustrated by André Ceolin

 

When Mr. Lopez walks into the pet store, Tucker scampers up his ramp and stands on tiptoe among the wood shavings to get a better look. As Mr. Lopez said hi to Rosa, the store owner, Tucker runs down again to find his friend. “‘Tip!’ says Tucker. ‘Come and see!’” Tip shyly comes out of his igloo and peers through the glass. “He sees a big nose. / Big brown eyes. / Big black glasses. / Blink. Blink.”

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Image copyright André Ceolin, 2019, text copyright Ann Ingalls and Sue Gallion, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Startled, Tip races back to the safely of the igloo. But Tucker and Tip have already charmed Mr. Lopez, and he tells Rosa he will take them home. He buys a cage and food and learns their names. Their new home will be noisy, he says, but fun. Tip worries. “Tip does not like noisy things.” At the pet shop there are “Noisy parrots. Bawk. Bawk. / Noisy puppies. Bark! Bark!” Tucker, on the other hand, “likes new things.”

“‘¡Vamos!’ Mr. Lopez says. ‘Let’s go!’” The cage bumps and jumps as he carries it to his car. Inside, Tucker and Tip sniff new smells—coffee and fries. They like the smells, but Tip is scared and hides in the igloo. “Just the tip of his tail shows.” The car zips and zags, and the cage jumps along. Finally, the car stops and Mr. Lopez carries the cage to a building. He goes inside and “click. Click. Click. / Mr. Lopez walks down a hall. / Creak. He opens a new door. / Clunk! The cage bumps.”

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Image copyright André Ceolin, 2019, text copyright Ann Ingalls and Sue Gallion, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Tucker climbs to the top of the cage and looks all around. He sniffs the air. He sees blocks, jump ropes, balls, and books. Tucker likes his new home and calls for Tip to come out. Before he leaves, Mr. Lopez picks up Tip and Tucker and smiles. “‘Hasta mañana,’ says Mr. Lopez. ‘See you tomorrow. Your first day of school!’”

Mr. Lopez turns out the lights, but Tip and Tucker aren’t ready to go to sleep yet. Inside the igloo, Tip wonders what school is. Tucker doesn’t know, but he’s excited for them to find out—together.

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Image copyright André Ceolin, 2019, text copyright Ann Ingalls and Sue Gallion, 2019. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Ann Ingalls and Sue Lowell Gallion’s vivacious language and sweet furry friends draw kids into this early reader that gives them confidence in their abilities while introducing them to two hamsters with different personalities. Ingalls and Gallion’s engaging story of a teacher looking for a classroom pet allows them to present words, vowel sounds, and familiar (or soon-to-be familiar) sight words in clever ways that while repeated never seem repetitious. Short sentences are filled with verve and a mix of dialogue and description. Onomatopoeic words sprinkled throughout add action and are fun to read out loud. In two places, the teacher, Mr. Lopez, speaks in Spanish, which is immediately followed by the translation. The two hamsters—Tip, a more hesitant hamster who does not like noise, and Tucker, who likes new things—reflect personalities that will resonate with readers. As Tip and Tucker set out on their new adventure together, children will be happy to join them in their own discovery of reading.

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André Ceolin’s cute-as-a-button Tip and Tucker will have kids smiling and exclaiming “Awww!” as they meet the little pair at Rosa’s pet shop and read on to discover where Mr. Lopez is taking them. Ceolin’s colorful illustrations organically help young readers decipher the text. For instance, as Mr. Lopez is described, he is shown from Tip’s perspective as he gazes into the hamsters’ tank, his big eyes and big black glasses clearly portrayed. Kids will appreciate familiar sights, such as the paper coffee cup and bag of French fries in Mr. Lopez’s car and empathize with little Tip as he hides in his igloo with only the tip of his tail showing.

Just the kinds of friends kids would want on a journey—both a road trip and a reading adventure—Tip and Tucker: Road Trip is an excellent choice for getting children excited about reading on their own.

Ages 5 – 7

Sleeping Bear Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1534110069

Discover more about Ann Ingalls and her books on her website.

Learn more about Sue Lowell Gallion and her books on her website.

To view a portfolio of work by André Ceolin and learn about his books, visit his website.

Tip and Tucker: Road Trip Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Sleeping Bear Press in an Instagram giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Tip and Tucker: Road Trip, written by Ann Ingalls and Sue Gallion | illustrated by André Ceolin

This giveaway is open from May 10 through May 16 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

Here’s how to enter:

  • Like the Giveaway Post
  • Follow Sleeping Bear Press 
  • Follow Celebrate Picture Books
  • Bonus: comment with your child’s classroom pet or your favorite animal for an extra entry (each tag gives you one more entry)

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | Prizing provided by Sleeping Bear Press.

National Hamster Day Activity

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Tip and Tucker Activity Sheet

 

Tip and Tucker are eager to get to their new home! Can you help them find their way in this printable activity sheet?

Tip and Tucker Activity Sheet

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You can find Tip and Tucker: Road Trip at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review