October 8 – It’s National Book Month

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About the Holiday

All this month people are reading and celebrating their favorite books—both old and new. It’s also a terrific time to honor independent bookstores that serve their community with carefully chosen titles for all ages of readers. Some indies focus on one genre or age of reader, offering a vast array of familiar and surprising books for customers to explore. Others are known for a particular ambience—mysterious, scholarly, fun! But all give readers a sense of community and a feeling of awe and wonder at all of the stories to discover. This month make a stop into your local bookstore a family event and pick up a new book (or several) for everyone!

King Mouse

Written by Cary Fagan | Illustrated by Dena Seiferling

 

In a wordless spread, a child with a tricycle cart full of various shaped crowns wheels through a field, spilling crowns as she goes. Later, a mouse creeps out of his hole in the ground and looks for something to nibble. He finds no food but does spy a small crown “glittering in the grass.” After inspecting it, he places the crown on his head. “It was a perfect fit.” Just then a bear walks up and asks the mouse if he is a king. The mouse replies that he is. The bear bows and cries, “‘Hail to the king!’”

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Image copyright Dena Seiferling, 2019, text copyright Cary Fagan, 2019. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

Soon a crow lands on a nearby branch. The bear introduces the mouse king. When the crow learns that the mouse is hungry, the crow immediately sets to looking for food to offer him. As the bear and the crow gather food, a tortoise approaches. Thrilled to learn that they “at last” have a king, he joins in. The mouse gobbles up all the seeds the trio brought.

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Image copyright Dena Seiferling, 2019, text copyright Cary Fagan, 2019. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

After he was full, the mouse announces that he is bored. As the three are deciding what to do, a fox appears. She suggests they perform a play. The mouse is delighted with the drama. He applauds. “‘I haven’t been this amused for ages,’ he said. ‘I like being king.’” Meanwhile, a snake slithering through the woods spies another crown. She puts it on her head.

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Image copyright Dena Seiferling, 2019, text copyright Cary Fagan, 2019. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

As soon as she does the other animals hail her as their queen. Everyone, that is, except the mouse who isn’t too happy. When the animals bow to the queen, the fox, the tortoise, and the crow each find a crown just their size hiding in the grass and proclaim themselves royalty. The bear searches for a crown for himself but can’t find one. He plods away while the others dance around singing their own praises. The bear finds a tree stump and sits down, dejected about his lack of good luck.

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Image copyright Dena Seiferling, 2019, text copyright Cary Fagan, 2019. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

Discovering that the bear is no longer with the group, the mouse goes in search of him. When he finds him, the mouse removes his crown and begins picking dandelions. He creates a wreath and gives it to the bear. The two sit quietly together. When the sun begins to set, the mouse hints that he might have a better vantage point “from up there.” The bear obliges and lifts the mouse to his shoulder. “‘I’m not really a king,” the bear sighs. The mouse agrees and then notes the beautiful sunset. Now it’s the bear’s turn to agree, and “they sat for a long time.” Returning through the field, the child, her tricycle cart now empty, spies a pile of five crowns discarded on an old tree stump.

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Image copyright Dena Seiferling, 2019, text copyright Cary Fagan, 2019. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

Cary Fagan’s modern fable has much to say and, as the genre often affords, offers much for readers to ponder and talk about. It is a fitting time for this story that, among other themes, questions the nature of leadership. When the mouse finds the first crown, not only does he proclaim himself king but he demands food and entertainment from his sudden subjects, unconcerned with their needs. But, yet, the animals mechanically bow to him and rush to fulfill his whims. When the snake, crow, and tortoise also find crowns, they gleefully decree their own sovereignty, forgetting the bear.

The mouse, however, seems to have learned a lesson. When he finds the bear, he removes his crown and offers one of his own creation to the bear, making him the only “king” independently chosen. Wiser than the others, the bear understands that he does not rule the others, and the mouse too sees that the equality of friendship and the grandeur of nature that is beholden to no one is more majestic than any crown. The introduction of the child in the wordless spreads give kids and adults the opportunity to discuss the possibility that the main story is one of imaginative play. Fagan’s dialogue-rich storytelling spotlights themes of pride, envy, disappointment, friendship, inclusion, and modesty and makes this a perfect tale for a school class, drama troupe, or other group to act out.

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Dena Seiferling’s soft, sepia-toned illustrations give the story a magical, dream-like quality while also anchoring it in the “real world.” Small snapshots that accompany the text on the left-hand pages introduce each animal as they come on the scene while full-page images clearly show the progression of the story and the changing attitudes of the animals. Early on, the mouse is uncertain, nibbling at the unknown object he finds. But once the crown is settled on his head, it takes only three pages for him to be accepting tributes and one more to find him lounging and demanding.

Children will be enchanted by the dramatic scenes of the play the animals put on for the mouse, and the tall crown the snake wears is a cunning stroke of suspense and one-upmanship. The illustration of the bear leaving the group as the others, oblivious to his feelings, parade around provides an opportunity for adults to talk about empathy and inclusion. As the bear and the mouse watch the setting sun together, readers can imagine that a new and more thoughtful day will dawn tomorrow.

A profound and affecting book, King Mouse is a story that will move and inspire children to think about interacting with others. The book would be have multiple applications for home, classroom, and school libraries and is a must for public libraries.

Ages 3 – 8

Tundra Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-0735264045

Discover more about Cary Fagan and his books on her website.

To learn more about Dena Seiferling, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Book Month Activity

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Book Love! Word Search

 

There are all kinds of books for every reader. Find your favorite along with twenty favorite genres in this printable puzzle.

Book Love! Word Search Puzzle | Book Love! Word Search Solution

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You can find King Mouse at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

September 27 – Read a New Book Month

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About the Holiday

As September winds down, there’s still time to feature one more new book for this month’s special holiday. Searching for and sharing new books—whether they are recently published or just new to you—is not only a fun way to spend a day together with kids, but an experience that pays big benefits now and in the future. Make a plan to add a few new books to your home library or visit your local library today!

Maybe

Written by Kobi Yamada | Illustrated by Gabriella Barouch

 

“Have you ever wondered why you are here?” Not why are you HERE? But why are YOU here? There is a very special reason, you know. “You are the only you there ever has been or ever will be,” and because of this “you have so much to offer.” You might discover or design something completely new. But first, you should experiment and explore, guided by your hopes and dreams.

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Image copyright Gabriella Barouch, 2019, text copyright Kobi Yamada, 2019. Courtesy of Compendium.

Perhaps your talent lies in helping “others to see the beauty in each day?” or maybe you will be the one that people cheer for. No matter what you do, do it with your whole heart and follow where that leads. It could be that you’ll be a light in the darkness. Or “maybe you will speak up for those who can’t speak for themselves?”This is not to say that life will always be easy. There will be struggles and fears and even failures, but each one will make you stronger and smarter.

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Image copyright Gabriella Barouch, 2019, text copyright Kobi Yamada, 2019. Courtesy of Compendium.

You have more courage than you might think, and the world is waiting for you. Just think—maybe “you are only scratching the surface of what you can do and who you can be?” But even now everything you need to do great things is inside of you. “Maybe you have no idea just how good you really can be” or “how much you matter?” But just your presence means that “anything is possible.”

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Image copyright Gabriella Barouch, 2019, text copyright Kobi Yamada, 2019. Courtesy of Compendium.

Like all parents and caregivers, Kobi Yamada understands that from day one children exhibit unique talents, personalities, and ideas that they will use to make their mark on the world. In Maybe, he beautifully expresses the ideals every adult wants their children to know and embrace. Yamada addresses that essential question that everyone asks themselves, starting in childhood and continuing throughout life. He offers reassurance that discovering one’s gift, place, or method of influence is not a one-time thing or quickly and easily found, and he encourages readers to take their time, explore, think, and keep their eyes and hearts open.

Kamada’s phrasing throughout the story is designed to uplift and also to promote thought and discussion. By ending lines that speak to what the reader might be or become with question marks, he invites children and adults to reflect on each suggestion. Sentences composed of self-esteem building ideas end with a period, reinforcing the wisdom in them. Yamada’s use of the word Maybe is also ingenious. Not only is it an adverb, prompting consideration, but deconstructed, May be becomes a verb bursting with promise. Sharing this book with their children, adults will also appreciate the sentiments—for as we know, life is ever-changing and we are too.

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Image copyright Gabriella Barouch, 2019, text copyright Kobi Yamada, 2019. Courtesy of Compendium.

Gabriella Barouch’s breathtaking illustrations immediately draw readers into the world of this story and the world of childhood with its mix of wonder, concreteness, imagination, and potential. The child’s striking cap made of leaves, coupled with their overalls, creates a clever way for Barouch to make the book gender-neutral while piquing readers’ interest in what they are doing from page to page. This child of nature quietly coexists with a fawn, bunny, birds, and squirrels and has, as a companion, one of the cutest piglets ever seen. Barouch’s use of various perspectives contributes to a fluid fluctuation between elements of fantasy and realism. As the story progresses, kids watch the child gathering supplies that she assembles in the final scenes to send her piglet off on its own adventure.

No maybe’s about it, Maybe is a book you’ll  want to add to your home, classroom, or public library collection.

Ages 5 and up

Compendium, 2019 | ISBN 978-1946873750

You can discover more about Kobi Yamada and his books on the Compendium website.

To learn more about Gabriella Barouch, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Read a New Book Month Activity

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Books to Love, Books to Read Book Bag

 

True book lovers can’t go anywhere without a book (or two or three) to read along the way. With this easy craft you can turn a cloth bag into a kid-size book bag!

Supplies

  • Printable Templates: Books to Read Template | Books to Love Template
  • Small cloth bag, available from craft or sewing stores—Recyclable Idea: I used the bag that sheet sets now come in
  • Cloth trim or strong ribbon, available from craft or sewing stores—Recyclable Idea: I used the cloth handles from shopping bags provided from some clothing stores
  • Scraps of different colored and patterned cloth. Or use quilting squares, available at craft and sewing stores
  • Pen or pencil for tracing letters onto cloth
  • Scissors
  • Small sharp scissors (or cuticle scissors) for cutting out the center of the letters
  • Fabric glue
  • Thread (optional)
  • Needle (optional)

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Directions

  1. Print the sayings and cut out the letters
  2. Trace letters onto different kinds of cloth
  3. Cut out cloth letters
  4. Iron cloth bag if necessary
  5. Attach words “Books to Read” to one side of bag with fabric glue
  6. Attach words “Books to Love” to other side of bag with fabric glue
  7. Cut cloth trim or ribbon to desired length to create handles
  8. Glue (or sew) handles onto the inside edge of bag

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You can find Maybe at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

September 16 – It’s Read a New Book Month

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About the Holiday

Read a New Book Month is a fantastic time to scour your local bookstore and library for books that have recently been published or books that are new to you. Finding a book that you’ve never read before is exciting at any age, and discovering a new book about a favorite topic or in a favorite series is one of life’s greatest pleasures. Today’s book shows how books can spark an interest that can lead to a new hobby or even a future career.

Lola Dutch When I Grow Up

By Kenneth and Sarah Jane Wright

 

Lola Dutch is a little girl whose mind swirls with all the possible things she could be when she grows up, and she wants to decide right now. Bear thinks it would be nice to talk about it over tea, but Lola’s in a hurry. “‘Quick, to the den!’” she says. Bear’s den is spectacular! It’s lined floor to ceiling with books on all topics, a comfy couch and an armchair beckon, and a fireplace keeps it nice and toasty. Today, Lola spies a book about opera and settles in.

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Image copyright Kenneth and Sarah Wright, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

After reading, Lola is convinced the stage is for her. In fact, it’s time to rehearse right now—as in full dress rehearsal. So, “Gator built the set. Pig composed the orchestrations. Crane designed the costumes.” And Bear brought the bouquet of roses for Lola’s final bow. At the end of the performance, Bear thinks Lola slayed it. But looking around at all of the intricate, moving props, Lola has decided that maybe she’d like to be an inventor. “Lola’s imagination soared” as she thought of all the aspects of being an inventor.

But then Lola wonders if perhaps she is “supposed to be something else when [she] grew up.” Suddenly, the fragrant flowers and buzzing bees catches her attention, and she thinks that being a botanist would be awesome. Prepping the soil, planting seeds, and caring for seedlings to “‘make the earth laugh with flowers’” is just what Lola wants to do. As Lola trims a topiary, Bear remarks, “‘Lola Dutch, you’ve grown so much.’”

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Image copyright Kenneth and Sarah Wright, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

And yet, Lola’s not finished growing. She ponders whether she should be a judge, an Egyptologist, a pastry chef, a chemist, and a whole host of other professions. The choices are endless, and Lola just can’t make up her mind. Bear has some sage advice. He asks her what she wants to be right then. Lola confides that she’s happy being a kid and learning about the world, and Bear encourages her to be just that. This sounds wonderful to Lola because, as she says, “‘I have a few more things I’d like to be tomorrow.’”

A surprise awaits readers on the the book jacket. On an extended flap at the back of the book are paper dolls of Lola Dutch and Pig as well as Lola’s voluminous opera gown. Turning the jacket to its reverse side, kids find an opulent, full-color stage, complete with airship, a topiary carousel, landmarks from Ancient Egypt, and Bear waiting to watch the performance. A glance at the copyright page reveals the creators in history who influence Lola’s imagination.

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Image copyright Kenneth and Sarah Wright, 2019, courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Welcome to childhood—that time when imagination and reality mesh, allowing kids to be and do anything they can think of. Kenneth and Sarah Jane Wright tap into that energy and enthusiasm as Lola contemplates all the things she could be when she grows up. All she needs to do to find plenty of brilliant career choices is to look around her surroundings. Acting? Check. Inventing? Yep. Botony, cooking, or chemistry? Yes, yes, or yes. But does she have to rush into it? There’s so much more to explore. The Wright’s brisk compilation of professions and the subsets that make them so interesting will entice any child to follow Lola’s example and make their own discoveries. 

Sarah Jane’s vibrant pencil, gouache, and watercolor illustrations shimmer with charm, and exuberance, reflecting that buoyant feeling of confidence and possibility of children interacting with their world. Fans of the first Lola Dutch book will love meeting up with Bear, Pig, Gator, and Crane once more and looking forward to the now—and the future—with such good friends.

Lola Dutch When I Grow Up is an inspiring sequel to Lola Dutch and will be a favorite and often-asked-for addition to home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 8

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1681195544

To learn more about Kenneth and Sarah Jane Wright, their books, and other ventures, visit their website.

Read a New Book Month Activity

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Kids who know just what they’d like to do when they grow up or those who are still exploring the options will enjoy filling out this printable Dream Job Application. After making the easy briefcase, kids will be ready to take the world by storm!

Supplies

Directions

To Make the Body of the Briefcase

  1. Cut a rectangle of poster board in proportion to child’s size. Leave ½ inch on either side of the shorter cut to glue the briefcase together. The longer side should be double the height you’d like the finished briefcase to be. (My example was made from a 12-inch by 20-inch strip.)
  2. Fold the poster board in half
  3. Glue the side edges together

To Make the Handle

  1. Cut a narrow strip of poster board
  2. Fold the right side of the strip toward you and down, pinching it tight; repeat on the left side

Print out the Dream Job Application and fill it in!

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You can find Lola Dutch When I Grow Up at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

September 11 – National Quiet Day

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About the Holiday

We’re surrounded by noise every day. Cars whoosh by on the street, TVs drone on, and voices fill the air in the office and at school. Sometimes it seems as if you don’t hear the constant din, but you do. Quiet Day was established to give people an opportunity to experience the benefits found in silence. Not only did the founders envision a day in which you sought out quiet places, but they suggest that you don’t speak at all for the entire day. Reconnecting with yourself and your thoughts can make you feel more relaxed and give you new perspectives that can stimulate creativity and better communications.

Albert’s Quiet Quest

By Isabelle Arsenault

 

With an “Ugh!” Albert heads out to his backyard to escape all the noise inside. He opens the gate to the alley, and there he sees, tossed away with an old lamp and some other trash, a painting of the setting sun shimmering on a calm ocean. Albert has an idea. He retrieves a chair and sits back, relaxing in front of the painting. In Albert’s imagination the hard, straight back chair becomes a beach lounger and the stony asphalt turns to soft sand.

Soon, two girls enter the alley. They’re repotting a green, leafy plant and ask Albert if he’d like to join them. “No, thanks, I’m reading. I’m fine,” Albert answers. Albert picks up the book on his lap and while he reads, the girl’s flowerpot turns into a beach pail, their coats become summer dresses, and the crown one girls is wearing softens into a wreath of flowers. Instead of potting a flower, they are building a sandcastle.

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Copyright Isabelle Arsenault, 2019, courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

In a few more minutes Albert’s brother Tom comes out with badminton racquets clutched in his arms. He’s been looking for Albert to play with, but Albert tells him he’s reading. It doesn’t look like he’s reading to Tom since Albert is just sitting in a chair with a book on his lap, but then one of the girls says she’ll play with Tom. The sandcastle grows as one girl pats sand into turrets and stairs while Tom and the other girl bat around an enormous birdie with oversized racquets.

Suddenly, another girl appears, strolling her doll in a green carriage. She wants Albert to watch her doll while she goes back to get her cat. Albert starts to object, but the girl is already gone. When she returns with her cat, she proclaims Albert “so sweet.” But the beach is now quite crowded and the baby doll is crying and crying. The sandcastle has sprouted taller towers and a grand entrance. Albert tries to shut it all out by putting his nose in his book.

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Copyright Isabelle Arsenault, 2019, courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Just then a boy from down the block shows up with his radio. The music blares through the alley, calming the baby, inviting dancing, and attracting another child to join in. Albert sits on his beach chair with his head on his fist scowling at the huge boom box, the caterwauling baby, the dancing kids, and that enormous birdie. And you should see the castle! It’s now big enough to stand on.

Then Jimmy comes rolling in on his skateboard. He scares the cat, tips over the potted plant, causes the birdie to “thunk!” into the painting, and in Albert’s imagination causes everything to go kerflooey. Albert slams his book shut, steps onto his chair, and lets loose about how all he wants to do is read. All the kids in the alley stare sadly at him as they gather up their stuff and head back home. Albert climbs down from his chair and sits, a bit forlornly. Then he hears the “KRRRRRR!” of a scraping chair. Tom is back with his own seat and book. Soon, there’s a “Clomp! Clomp,” a “Tap Tap Tap,” a “Zzoooom,” a “tip tap,” and a “TTRRRRR,” and all of the kids are back with their own books.

Albert looks around at all of his friends sitting nearby quietly reading and smiles. He says, “Hey, guys… I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to—.” The kids all turn to him and say, “SHHH! SHHH!” Albert gazes at them and they gaze at Albert. Then they all erupt in laughter and enjoy the last moments of the sunset on the beach.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-albert's-quiet-quest-beach

Copyright Isabelle Arsenault, 2019, courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Isabelle Arsenault’s clever story nimbly switches back and forth between Albert’s imagined day at the beach and the reality in the alley, which little-by-little overtakes Albert’s quiet interlude. Each child, intent on their own activity, is not aware of or not bothered by the collective noise, but for Albert the din takes him to the breaking point. When Albert loses his cool, these children—first met in Arsenault’s Colette’s Lost Pet—flee, but not away from Albert. They empathize, and soon return with books of their own to fulfill Albert’s quest for quiet and show true friendship.

Arsenault’s buoyant cartoon-inspired line drawings alternate between the gray-scale background of the alley and the beach scenes rendered in tranquil tones of aqua and orange—the same colors that define Albert and his book. Details like the crying “baby” and the growing badminton set and radio as well as Albert’s meltdown provide opportunities for kids and adults to talk about how noise is perceived by people who thrive in a quieter atmosphere.

A charming mix of imagination, humor, and friendship, Albert’s Quiet Quest would be a delightful addition to home and public library bookshelves and a conversation starter for elementary school classrooms.

Ages 3 – 7

Random House Books for Young Readers, 2019 | ISBN 978-0553536560

To learn more about Isabelle Arsenault, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Quiet Day Activity

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Make Your Own Sensory Sand

 

You can have quiet fun with this sensory sand that you can mold or just let slip through your fingers.

Supplies

  • 1 cup sand
  • ½ tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon dish soap
  • Water as needed – about ¾ cup
  • Bin or bowl for mixing dry ingredients
  • Bowl for mixing dish soap and water

Directions

  1. In the bin combine the sand and cornstarch and mix well
  2. In the bowl combine the dish soap and water until the water is bubbly
  3. Slowly add the water mixture to the dry ingredients, mixing and adding water little-by-little until the desired consistency is reached. The grain of the sand will determine how much water is needed.
  4. The sand can be formed with cookie cutters, molds, hands, etc. and is strong enough to stack.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-albert's-quiet-quest-cover

You can find Albert’s Quiet Quest at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

August 30 – National Frankenstein Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday celebrates the birth of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, who in 1818 at the age of 18, penned one of the most influential books of all time. Considered the first modern science fiction novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus incorporates elements of horror, psychology, love, abandonment, and acceptance. These themes and Shelley’s enthralling storytelling created a book that is always current. During this 200th anniversary year of the publishing of classic novel, discover (or rediscover) the spellbinding thrill of reading Frankenstein.

Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein

Written by Linda Bailey | Illustrated by Júlia Sardà

 

Mary was a dreamer. She liked to spend time alone, thinking and imagining “things that never were.” Mary called these daydreams “‘castles in the air.’” Mary loved to write stories too, but her daydreams were even more thrilling. When Mary wanted to read and dream, she went to the graveyard and sat next to her mother’s grave. Mary’s mother had died when Mary was only 11 days old.

While Mary loved her father, she didn’t like the way he punished her. Mary didn’t like his new wife, either. Mary’s father is friends with many famous people, and he invites them to visit. One night “a writer named Samuel Taylor Coleridge recites a strange, eerie poem—The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner. Mary loves such poems.” Even though she was supposed to be in bed, she hid and listened, shivering “with fear at the spine-tingling tale of a ship full of ghosts.” Forever after, Mary remembered that night and that poem.

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Image copyright Júlia Sardà, 2018, text copyright Linda Bailey, 2018. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

By the time Mary was fourteen, she was unhappy at home and causing trouble. One night, when she was sixteen, she and her stepsister, Claire, ran away with a “brilliant, young poet” named Percy Bysshe Shelley. They traveled through Europe, one day finding themselves outside a “ruined castle. It’s called Castle Frankenstein. Such an interesting name! Does it stick in Mary’s mind?”

Eighteen months later, the three traveled to Switzerland, where they became friends with Lord Byron—the most famous poet in the world. One night as torrential storms crashed around Lord Byron’s house, he read ghost stories from Fantasmagoriana. After reading, Byron challenged his friends, who also included a doctor named John Polidori, to write a ghost story. Eighteen-year-old Mary, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Polidori accepted the challenge. But Mary could not think of a good story idea.

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Image copyright Júlia Sardà, 2018, text copyright Linda Bailey, 2018. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

Soon, Shelley and Polidori gave up on their ghost stories, but their talk of new scientific experiments excited Mary. “Electricity can make the muscles of a dead frog twitch. Could it bring a dead creature to life? The idea is both thrilling and frightening.” The idea captured Mary, but instead of a frog, she imagined “a hideous monster, made of dead body parts, stretched out—and coming to life!” Mary suddenly realized she had the idea for her ghost story.

It took nine months for Mary to finish her story. When it was published, some people thought it had been written by Percy Bysshe Shelley—they didn’t “believe young Mary could have done it! How could a girl like her come up with such a story?” But she was a writer, assembling bits and pieces, ideas, and scientific changes in her imagination until they turned into the book Frankenstein. In the two-hundred years since the novel was first published, the story has become a classic. It has sparked movies, inspired other writers, and become a favorite all around the world.

An extensive Author’s Note about Mary Shelley, her life, and inspiration as well as Linda Bailey’s thoughts on the story behind Frankenstein follows the text. A full-page portrait of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and a list of sources rounds out the informative backmatter.

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Image copyright Júlia Sardà, 2018, text copyright Linda Bailey, 2018. Courtesy of Tundra Books.

With atmospheric and riveting details, Linda Bailey captures the life of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and the influences on her imagination that resulted in Frankenstein. Bailey’s use of the present tense is inspired as it reflects the continued currency of the novel while encouraging today’s readers to embrace their “castles in the air.” Facts about Mary’s travels, new scientific discoveries, and favorite books sprinkled throughout the story inform readers on how the imagination combines experiences to create art.

One look at Júlia Sardà’s spellbinding cover tells readers that they are in for an extraordinary reading experience. Muted tones of red, green, gold, blue, and plum cloaked in black create a thrilling backdrop to Bailey’s story. Ghostly winged creatures fly over Lord Byron’s home on a stormy night, smoky monsters emerge from Fantasmagoriana, a frog sits up in its coffin, and the spectre of the monster leans over Mary and sleeps at her feet as she writes her novel. At once spine-tingling and cozy, Júlia Sardà’s illustrations will draw children into this superb story of a ghost story.

Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein is sure to spark the imagination of children who love literature, art, and writing. The book would be a thrilling addition to classroom libraries for literature and writing classes as well as an inspiring favorite on home bookshelves.

Ages 5 – 8

Tundra Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1770495593

Discover more about Linda Bailey and her books on her website.

To learn more about Júlia Sardà, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Frankenstein Day Activity

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Monstrously Good Puzzle

 

See if you’re a Frankenstein scholar by filling in this printable puzzle full of words and phrases about the novel!

Monstrously Good Puzzle | Monstrously Good Puzzle Word ListMonstrously Good Puzzle Solution

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You can find Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

December 24 – Christmas Eve

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About the Holiday

While traditions may vary, children around the world look forward to Christmas Eve night with its sense of wonder and magic. Anything, it seems, is possible on this special night—just as today’s book shows.

The Little Reindeer

By Nicola Killen

 

Ollie, dressed in her reindeer pajamas, had just drifted off to sleep when she heard a faint “jingle, jingle, jingle.” She woke and “rushed to the window, but all she could see was a blanket of fresh snow!” She picked up her sled and headed outside. Just as Ollie caught a falling snowflake, “she heard the magical sound again. Jingle, jingle, jingle.” She flopped on her sled and zipped down a hill, following the sound as it became clearer and clearer.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-reindeer-bells-jingle

Copyright Nicola Killen, 2017, courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

When Ollie came to the edge of the woods, she could hear the bells jangling louder and louder. “She took a deep breath and, feeling very brave, she ran into the darkness.” There, she saw a red collar “circled with silver bells.” She wondered whose it was. Suddenly, “a reindeer stepped through the crisp snow toward Ollie.” The reindeer knelt down as Ollie attached his collar. Then he bent lower to allow Ollie to climb on his back.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-reindeer-on-sled

Copyright Nicola Killen, 2017, courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

While Ollie thought that they might ride through the forest, she found herself soaring “up into the night sky, leaving the trees far below!”  They flew over the town and the bay, over fields and forests through the snowy night. The reindeer brought Ollie home, landing softly in the snow right outside her door. Ollie didn’t want to leave her new friend, but she knew “there was someone very special who needed the reindeer’s help that night.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-reindeer-into-forest

Copyright Nicola Killen, 2017, courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Ollie quietly climbed the stairs to her room and quickly fell asleep, “dreaming of her magical journey.” She didn’t hear the jingle of the bells as her reindeer once more streaked across the sky. In the morning, Ollie unwrapped a very special gift that would  remind her of her new friend until they met again next year.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-reindeer-finds-collar

Copyright Nicola Killen, 2017, courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Nicola Killen’s tale of imagination and the magic that children can find in Christmas will charm young readers. Adorable Ollie dreams of reindeer not only at night but all the time, as children can see in Ollie’s room that is filled with reminders of her favorite animal, including a book about reindeer, a reindeer bookend, reindeer sheets, reindeer wallpaper, a reindeer plush, and plenty of reindeer drawings.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-reindeer-meets-reindeer

Copyright Nicola Killen, 2017, courtesy of simonandschuster.com.

Killen’s story has a dreamy feeling, prompting readers to wonder: is this nighttime jaunt real or not? A clue may lie in the fact that the reindeer wears a blanket of the same pattern as Ollie’s bedspread. Killen’s gray-scale illustrations are beautifully accented with touches of red and sprinkled with silver that glints from the sleigh bells, snow-topped trees, and in the magical swoop of the reindeer’s flight. Several die-cuts invite readers to follow Ollie into the night and through the woods and offers a peek out Ollie’s window to see her reindeer pass by as she sleeps.

A sweet story for little dreamers, The Little Reindeer is a classic tale that will enchant children around the holidays and beyond and would be a favorite addition to home bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1481486866

Discover more about Nicola Killen, her books, and her art on her website

Christmas Eve Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-fireplace-and-stockings

Hanging Stockings Coloring Page

 

Hanging stockings by the fireplace is a fun Christmas Eve tradition! Get your crayons, colored pencils, or markers and enjoy this printable Hanging Stockings Coloring Page.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-little-reindeer-cover

You can find The Little Reindeer at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 31 – National Magic Day

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About the Holiday

While there’s lots of magic going on today as little witches and wizards roam neighborhoods across the country casting spells and charming people to give them candy as part of Halloween, National Magic Day got it’s start in 1938 when a Chicago member of the Society of American Magicians sought official permission to honor the great Harry Houdini with a special day of recognition for his contributions to the world of magic. Houdini’s wife sanctioned the holiday and proclaimed October 31 – the date of his death in 1926 – as National Magic Day.

Tundra Books sent me a copy of The Magician’s Secret to check out. All opinions are my o own. 

The Magician’s Secret

Written by Zachary Hyman | Illustrated by Joe Bluhm

 

When Mom and Dad dropped Charlie off at his grandfather’s for an overnight visit, they pleaded with him to make sure his grandson went to bed early. “‘No more hocus-pocus!’” his daughter said. That wasn’t just some phrase she conjured up, because her father had once been a magician and was still “like a big kid who never grew up.” He loved to play games with Charlie and “also knew the most amazing tricks.” But he never told Charlie his secrets.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-magician's-secret-attic

Copyright Joe Bluhm, 2018, courtesy of joebluhm.com.

What Charlie loved best were Grandpa’s stories. Whenever Grandpa told a story, he and Charlie went up to the “most cobwebby corner of the attic” where a big green trunk full of special things from Grandpa’s adventures sat. Grandpa would pull out an item and begin to talk. This night he showed Charlie an hourglass filled with sand that Grandpa said came from the tomb of King Tut.

Another time, he pulled out a scarf that had belonged to the World War I Red Baron fighter pilot. Grandpa had plucked it from the Red Baron’s neck during a dogfight in which Grandpa left the Baron and his plane floating in a French sea. One summer evening the story revolved around a coconut shell that he found on a tropical beach. He had fallen asleep under a palm tree only to be awakened by a roaring T-Rex intent on eating him. Just in the nick of time, “dozens of rocks rained down through the air, scaring the nasty dinosaur away.” Who had saved him? Grandpa never told, saying that was for Charlie to figure out.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-magician's-secret-red-baron

Copyright Joe Bluhm, 2018, courtesy of joebluhm.com.

Charlie loved Grandpa’s stories, but his father said that they were just “things Grandpa’s made up.” Charlie couldn’t believe it. He felt like he “had lived every one of those adventures with Grandpa. How could they not be true?” When Charlie asked his grandfather about it, Grandpa sighed. He said the problem with grown-ups was that they didn’t “have faith in make-believe” but that if you “use your imagination, you can turn a dream into something real.”

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Copyright Joe Bluhm, 2018, courtesy of joebluhm.com.

Charlie wasn’t so sure, but Grandpa assured him: “‘We’ve done it over and over again, with cameras and computers, automobiles and airplanes…. Magic is all around us, kiddo—in me and in you.’” Then Grandpa waved his hands in the air and produced a…rock. He said it was the philosopher’s stone that could do magical things, but the secret was that “‘You have to see it, you have to believe it.’” That night Charlie fell into a deep sleep with the rock under his pillow. When he woke up, he heard an earth-shattering roar. He looked and saw a T-Rex threatening his grandpa. He looked at the rock in his hand and knew what to do….

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-magician's-secret-in-bed

Copyright Joe Bluhm, 2018, courtesy of joebluhm.com.

Zachary Hyman makes magic with traditional storytelling combined with the wonder of imagination and the encouragement to make dreams come true. As Grandpa talks about his daring feats, Charlie believes him, but more importantly, Charlie believes that he could do such marvelous things too. Hyman’s reminder that all great discoveries and achievements began as someone’s seemingly impossible idea is well aimed at his young audience whose boundless imaginations may just be our next realities. Hyman’s evocative language and conversational tone  will keep children enthralled until the surprise ending.

Joe Bluhm lends a mysterious enchantment to Hyman’s story with his atmospheric depictions of the cobwebby attic, darkened, creature-infested tomb, and twilit skies. Turning from the setup to the heart of Grandpa’s stories, readers are immersed in vibrant colors and dazzling light, representative of that flash of ingenuity or creativity in each of us. In a nice cyclical set of images, Charlie is first seen watching TV and playing aviator, spaceman, explorer, artists, and magician with Grandpa in sepia-toned snapshots. Near the end of the book when Grandpa talks about the power of imagination, these same scenes are presented in full color with Charlie as a pilot, astronaut, movie director, mountain climber, race car driver, and explorer.

Like the best magic trick, The Magician’s Secret will captivate readers but will also tell them what they really want to know: the answer to how they can do wondrous things themselves. The book would make a terrific addition to home, classroom, and school libraries.

Ages 5 – 8

Tundra Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1770498945

To learn more about Joe Bluhm, his books, and his art, visit his website.

It’s no secret that you’ll love this The Magician’s Secret book trailer!

National Magic Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-it's-magic-maze

It’s Magic! Maze

 

Help the spell flow to the top hat to make the magic work in this printable maze!

It’s Magic! Maze | It’s Magic! Maze Solution

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You can find The Magician’s Secret at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

Picture Book Review