March 18 – National Awkward Moments Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-cover

About the Holiday

We’ve all had them—those moments when we trip over our own feet, forget a name, wave to someone we don’t know—those moments when we wish we could disappear. Times like that are…well…awkward. So why do they get their own holiday? Well,  moments like that happen to everyone, they’re just part of being human. Today, celebrate those small embarrassments and even enjoy a laugh with the endearingly over-eager caterpillar in today’s book.

By Jakki Licare

The VERY Impatient Caterpillar

By Ross Burach

 

The Impatient Caterpillar is wondering why all the caterpillars are climbing up the tree. His friend tells him that they are going up to metamorphosize, but Impatient Caterpillar doesn’t know what that means. “Meta-WHAT-now?” he asks. His friend explains they are turning into butterflies. Caterpillar had no idea he could do that! He cannot wait to become a butterfly. 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-meta-what

Image copyright Ross Burach, 2019, courtesy of Scholastic.

Hanging upside down side-by-side at the top of the tree, Impatient Caterpillar wants to know what comes next. His friend explains that they now need to build a chrysalis, and, in the blink of an eye, he’s completely encased in his chrysalis. Impatient Caterpillar is incredulous. “WHAAAT? How did you DO that? Is it a spin? Or more of a twirl?” Impatient Caterpillar struggles to build his chrysalis, but once he is encased, he wonders what he has to do next. His friend replies, “Just be patient and let nature take its course.” 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-two-weeks

Image copyright Ross Burach, 2019, courtesy of Scholastic.

Impatient Caterpillar is full of questions. Mainly, “Am I a butterfly yet?” All the other chrysalises tell them to be quiet because, after all, they are trying to metamorphosize. When Impatient Caterpillar learns that it takes two weeks to turn into a butterfly, he freaks out. What if he has to go bathroom? He looks at his watch, calls for a comic book, tries to order a pizza, and plays with a paddle ball. Looking at the calendar, he realizes that it’s still Day 1 and decides that he is going to break free. 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-escape

Image copyright Ross Burach, 2019, courtesy of Scholastic.

He bursts out of his chrysalis and is convinced that he is a butterfly. Unfortunately, he is now only a rather dilapidated and awkward-looking caterpillar. He jumps off of the branch to fly and splats to the ground. He decides to try to metamorphosize again. Back in his chrysalis, Impatient Caterpillar gives himself a lot of pep talks, trying to convince himself that he can do this time. A squirrel watches curiously as he hears Impatient Caterpillar talking to himself.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-splat

Image copyright Ross Burach, 2019, courtesy of Scholastic.

At last the Impatient Caterpillar seems to be getting the hang of it. He practices deep breathing and speaks positively to himself until on Day 7 he finally finds his inner chill. And at the end of the week…he emerges as a beautiful butterfly! He professes a new appreciation for patience. But…wait!…where is everybody going? His friend tells him they’re migrating. “Right. Right.,” this newly patient butterfly says. He takes off, ready for the long flight. Just one question: “ARE WE THERE YET?”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-inside

Image copyright Ross Burach, 2019, courtesy of Scholastic.

 Ross Burach’s fun and silly story is told completely in dialogue with bright bold graphics. The VERY Impatient Caterpillar merges the importance of positive thinking and patience with the science of metamorphosis. The story gives great context clues as to what metamorphosis, a chrysalis, and migration are. This allows teachers and parents to open up conversations afterwards as to the definitions of these words. Children can point out dialogue like “Transform into butterflies” for metamorphosis or the visual of a chrysalis after the caterpillars climb the tree.

Not only does this story have a wonderful science element to it, but it also touches on the necessity of believing in yourself. The second time Impatient Caterpillar tries to metamorphosize, he doesn’t fully believe that he can be patient enough. Then, he starts talking positively to himself. “I can be patient,” he tells himself.  He takes deep breaths in and out to calm himself down. Burach even illustrates the Impatient Caterpillar meditating in his chrysalis. When the Impatient Caterpillar realizes he’s made it to day 7 he exclaims, “I’m doing it!” These are terrific elements to point out to children and discuss how we can encourage ourselves.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-migrating

As many children can relate, Burach’s lovable main character struggles with patience. The wonderful illustrations of the Impatient Caterpillar inside his chrysalis show him wide eyed, sweating, flipping calendar pages and staring at his watch. The flood of black around the chrysalis also emphasizes how alone the Impatient Caterpillar must feel. When the Impatient Caterpillar prematurely emerges from his chrysalis, Bruach physically shows the problems with impatience. Caterpillar is steaming, his antennae are warped, and he’s crazy-eyed. Burach’s perfect ending showing Impatient Caterpillar struggling on his migration journey shows that patience is something that has to be constantly practiced.

A fun read aloud for any story time, to encourage patience and mindfulness, and a welcome addition to science lessons for classrooms and homeschool, The VERY Impatient Caterpillar will take flight as a favorite on home, school, and public library bookshelves. 

Ages 4-8

Scholastic Press,  2019 | ISBN 978-1338289411 | ISBN 978-1338601138 (Spanish edition)

Discover more about Ross Burach and his books on his website.

National Awkward Moments Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-craft

Chrysalis to Butterfly

 

Make your own chrysalis and watch your butterflies emerge! Color your own butterflies and fold them into their own chrysalises. Once placed in the water, the butterflies will transform.

Supplies

  • Printable Butterfly Template
  • Paper
  • Markers/Crayons
  • Scissors
  • Shallow pan filled with water 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-craft-2

Directions

  1. Print the butterfly template
  2. Color butterflies
  3. Cut butterflies out. Be sure to snip in between the wings
  4. Gently fold butterflies. Do not fold hard or crease them, otherwise they will not unfold
  5. Place in the shallow pan in water. Butterflies will open up on their own!
celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-very-impatient-caterpillar-cover

You can find The VERY Impatient Caterpillar at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

P

 

March 17 – St. Patrick’s Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-green-on-green-cover

About the Holiday

St. Patrick’s Day commemorates the life of Saint Patrick and is celebrated on the date of his death around AD 493. Saint Patrick is known for spreading Christianity across Ireland and establishing the country’s first organized church. While he did not profess the Christian faith while growing up, he credited God for helping him to escape, after 6 years, from Irish pirates who kidnapped him at the age of 16 and put him to work as a shepherd. He believed he was later called to preach the gospel in a dream and spend 16 years preparing for this work. The first St. Patrick’s Day Feast took place in the early 1700s and the first St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the American colonies was held in New York in 1762. Today, March 17 is a day of religious significance and a day for fun. So, don’t forget to wear green, look for leprechauns, and read today’s perfectly colored book!

Green on Green

Written by Dianne White | Illustrated by Felicita Sala

 

In this gorgeous celebration of nature and the anticipation of new life, Dianne White and Felicita Sala take readers on a lyrical journey through the seasons as colors burst, meld, overlap, and give definition to our observations and activities. The story opens in springtime, where a little boy and his mom, who’s just showing a baby bump, enjoy a field of yellow and blue flowers. Red accents include a small ladybug, the boy’s shirt, and a lighthouse in the distance.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-green-on-green-lemonade

Image copyright Felicita Sala, 2020, text copyright Dianne White, 2020. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

At home the thirsty boy reaches across a picnic table, decorated with those wildflowers, that holds “Lemonade petals. / Sunflakes between. / Lemonade, sunflakes, and yellow on green.” Spring is also soft blue skies, white birds like miniature clouds, and a pond where cattails and water lilies grow and a little splash promises the boy underwater discovery. Of course, spring also means changing weather and so the boy in his yellow rain boots runs through his yard, where “breezes and rain and yellow on green” make art from a showery day.

Summer comes with its brilliant blue ocean trimmed in white and blue seashells that dot the sand. Underneath, more colors appear. Now, “Turquoise the water. / Teal between. / Turquoise, teal, and blue on green.” Summer is also as golden as the full sun and ripe peaches enjoyed on a picnic with friends. Soon, there will be another child to join them.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-green-on-green-ocean

Image copyright Felicita Sala, 2020, text copyright Dianne White, 2020. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Autumn appears with its own palette of red and yellow, orange and… “Brown the squirrel. / Brown the mouse. / Brown the trees around our house.” The baby is growing bigger now and the family gathers inside for hot soup, steaming cups of tea, and homemade bread. Later, their friends will join them for Thanksgiving dinner with a full “table and candles and brown on green.”

Winter brings “White the breath. / White the snow. / White and black the cawing crow” as  the little boy and his dad chop and carry wood for their fire. They then take a walk along snowy ridges past other homes with smoking chimneys and a herd of deer foraging for food and leaving hoof prints in the pristine blanket of white.

The holidays come and go and late winter sees the birth of the family’s newest member. As Mom rocks the baby to sleep, Dad takes his son outside to see new life there too among the trees. In the glow from the windows, the violet twilight, the quiet earth, and the anticipation of spring, they know: “Peaceful the evening. / Pine between. / Evening and pine and green…on green.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-green-on-green-winter

Image copyright Felicita Sala, 2020, text copyright Dianne White, 2020. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Dianne White’s tender and serene tribute to the cyclical hues and emotional cues of life is a beautiful read aloud for quiet story times throughout the year. Her spare sentences and repeated phrasing create exquisite imagery while inviting readers to look deeper and discover in each experience a fresh “green” appreciation for its beauty and meaning. Her emphasis on family and community is as warm as a hug and offers children the comfort of belonging and the reassurance of love.

Felicita Sala’s mixed media illustrations surprise on every page with vistas that are at once sweeping and personal. Each spread is highlighted with small bursts of accent colors that draw the eye, extend the transition from season to season, and are blended—as on any artist’s palette—to create the stirring colors seen from page to page and in nature itself. Sala’s images of the family alone and with friends as they prepare for the birth of their second child quietly portray the rhythms of daily life as they enjoy the seasons in their individual ways and together. The endpapers present the portrait of a tree in spring, summer, fall, and winter.

For contemplative and family story times and to spark creative activities throughout the year, Green on Green would also make a meaning story to share with a child as they prepare to become a big brother or sister. The book is highly recommended for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 8

Beach Lane Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1481462785

Discover more about Dianne White and her books on her website.

To learn more about Felicita Sala, her books, and her art, visit her website.

St. Patrick’s Day Activity

Green-on-Green-activity-kit-sensing-the-seasons-page

Green on Green Activity Kit

 

If you’re looking for fun activities that will get your kids thinking, observing, writing, and drawing, you’ve found them all in this one printable Green on Green Activity Kit available on Dianne White’s website.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-green-on-green-cover

You can find Green on Green at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 16 – It’s Women’s History Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-cover

About the Holiday

This year we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment which gave women the right to vote. The theme of this year’s Women’s History Month celebration is “Valiant Women of the Vote” and commemorates not only the women who fought for voting equality in the past but also those who, during the 20th century and through today, fight against other forms of voter suppression. Today’s book honors one of those women. For more information and vast resources especially under Suffrage Centennial, visit the National Women’s History Alliance website.

The Voice that Won the Vote: How One Woman’s Words Made History

Written by Elisa Boxer | Illustrated by Vivien Mildenberger

 

The year was 1920 and women were demanding the right to vote, just as they had been for the last seventy-five years. But all of their meetings, shouting, and signs were silenced. Men called the women “troublemakers” and “uncivilized.” Some men said it would “cause chaos” if women could vote, and others said “‘the only vote a woman needs is the vote to choose her husband.” There were even other women who thought women shouldn’t vote.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-silenced

Image copyright Vivien Mildenberger, 2020, text copyright Elisa Boxer, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

But then there was Febb Burn from East Tennessee who had gone to college, become a teacher, and loved to keep learning. She was especially interested in laws and how they were made, and every year as she watched her farmhands head off to vote on election day, she wanted to be able to go too. Finally, she grew so tired of being “shut out of the process” that she wrote a letter to her son.

Who was her son? His name was Harry Burn, and he was the “youngest lawmaker in Tennessee.” As he read his mother’s letter, he watched out his window as people from across the country gathered to decide the fate of women’s suffrage. One round of voting had already taken place, and it had resulted in a tie. Thirty-five states had voted yes on the issue, but thirty-six were needed to make it a law. Harry Burn for Tennessee had been one of the “no” votes in the first round. Now in the second round, Harry Burn would be the deciding vote. A “no” would deny women the vote, while a “yes” would change elections forever.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-letter

Image copyright Vivien Mildenberger, 2020, text copyright Elisa Boxer, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

“He knew that most of the people who had elected him hated the idea of women voting.” Many of them were even in the audience and were counting on him. He was, after all, wearing a red rose—”the symbol of keeping women in the home, and out of the voting booth”—in his pocket. When it came time for Harry to vote, all eyes were on him as he said “‘Yes.’” The officials thought he’d “made a mistake” or “gotten confused,” but he hadn’t. The suffragettes cheered and hugged.

Everyone wanted to know why Harry Burn had changed his mind. In answer, he pulled from his pocket the letter his mother had written urging him to vote for suffrage. Harry constituents were shocked and angry. They vowed to vote against him in the next election. The headlines in the newspapers said that Harry had ruined his career. But Harry already knew that. He knew that his vote would mean “giving up his seat in the Tennessee House of Representatives.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-Harry

Image copyright Vivien Mildenberger, 2020, text copyright Elisa Boxer, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

When interviewed for newspaper articles, Harry said that he had followed his conscience that all people should have the right to vote. At last the election was held, and Harry awaited his fate as all the votes were counted. Who would be the next Tennessee Representative? Harry Burn! “And no one was prouder than the woman who, without speaking a word, gave all women a vote.”

In an Author’s Note, Elisa Boxer talks more about the women’s suffrage movement, the courage to stand up for what you believe in, and the power of using the vote to voice your opinion. A timeline of significant events in the women’s suffrage movement is also included.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-Harry-Burn

Image copyright Vivien Mildenberger, 2020, text copyright Elisa Boxer, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

For anyone wondering about the power of one vote, Elisa Boxer puts all doubts to rest with her engaging recounting of this little-known true story. While Harry Burn’s vote took place 100 years ago, the courage he showed in standing up for his own conscience and in opposition to what was expected of him reverberates today. Boxer opens the story with a clear and meaningful definition of how a vote equals one’s voice, instilling in children who are learning to speak up for themselves in classrooms, on social media, and elsewhere the importance of voting when they come of age.

Her inclusion of quotes revealing the reasons behind opposition to women’s suffrage will be eye-opening. Her well-paced building of suspense going into the second vote and the aftermath will have kids on the edge of their seat and offers many opportunities to discuss the mechanisms of politics, expectations, and courage. Through her straightforward yet multilayered storytelling, Boxer presents two heroes for children to look up to: Harry, who put the good of the country and women ahead of his own career and Febb, who used her voice to make lasting change.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-suffragettes

Image copyright Vivien Mildenberger, 2020. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Vivien Mildenberger’s lovely, textured illustrations take readers back to the pivotal year of 1920, when vocal suffragettes faced their equally vocal opposition and Febb Burn, sitting on her front porch decided to write her life-changing letter. Images of politicians sporting yellow and red roses reveal the long tradition of color as an identifying symbol. An especially powerful spread comes after Harry’s vote as he walks among his angry constituents, all of whom shun him behind newspapers full of articles about the historic vote. The inclusion of the actual Febb Burn’s letter to Harry and a photograph of Febb give readers see and hear from this influential woman.

A stirring true story about the power of one person to make a difference, The Voice that Won the Vote is highly recommended for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 7 – 10

Sleeping Bear Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1534110496

You can download a The Voice that Won the Vote Teaching Guide from Sleeping Bear Press here.

Discover more about Elisa Boxer, her book, journalism, and other work on her website.

To learn more about Vivien Mildenberger, her books, and her art on her website.

Women’s History Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-get-out-and-vote-maze

Get Out and Vote! Maze

 

Help the girl find her way through the maze to the ballot box so she can cast her vote in this printable maze.

Get Out and Vote! Maze | Get Out and Vote! Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-vote-that-won-the-vote-cover

You can find The Voice the Won the Vote at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

March 14 – National Children’s Craft Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-easter-egg-day-cover

About the Holiday

March is National Craft Month and today is set aside especially for children to engage in this fun and diverse activity. Crafting has many benefits for kids, including using their creativity, honing fine motor skills, following directions, and learning to work independently. Doing crafts is also a great way to spend time away from the computer or TV and often results in an item that kids can be proud of. Using recyclable materials makes crafting inexpensive and gives the recycled items new life.

I received a copy of Easter Egg Day from Tara Knudson for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Tara to offer a signed copy of the book. See details below.

Easter Egg Day

Written by Tara Knudson | Illustrated by Pauline Siewert

 

It’s Easter egg-dyeing day for the rabbit family. The little bunnies put on their smocks and gather the hard-boiled eggs and other supplies on the table. To make each egg special, the bunnies “use a crayon, / draw designs— / circles, shapes, / zigzag lines. / Rabbit, lamb, / butterflies, / ready, set— / time for dyes!”

Carefully, they dip them into the cups of blue, green, yellow, and red dye. These colors are fun, but then they get creative, mixing red and blue and double-dipping. The bunnies set their eggs out to dry, and just in time they’re ready for the big Easter egg hunt.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-easter-egg-day-smocks

Image copyright Pauline Stewert, 2020, text copyright Tara Knudson, 2020. Courtesy of Zonderkidz.

“Neighbors, friends, / at the door. / Baskets held, / eggs galore!” The little bunnies, moles, and mice race out into the yard and hide their eyes as the adults hide the eggs in the tall grass, near trees, and under flowers. When all the eggs are hidden, the kids spread out, hoping to fill their empty baskets.

They find all of the eggs except seven—can you help the kids look around? Along with the real eggs, there are plastic eggs that pop open to reveal treats—”stickers, toys, / Easter sweets!” Then it’s time for games and races, smiles and cheers. Come and join the Easter fun!

Easter egg decorating tips are included after the story.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-easter-egg-day-dying-eggs

Image copyright Pauline Stewert, 2020, text copyright Tara Knudson, 2020. Courtesy of Zonderkidz.

Little ones love the magic of dyeing Easter eggs, and Tara Knudson’s bright, bouncy rhymes perfectly convey the giggly excitement kids feel during this once-a-year tradition. Readers will eagerly anticipate each step and page turn along the way as the bunnies turn their carton of white eggs into a basket full of creative, colorful treasures. Of course, Easter eggs are made for hiding and finding, and Knudson invites kids to join the bunnies and little moles and mice as they scamper through the yard on this most joyful of all hunts.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-easter-egg-day-friends

Image copyright Pauline Stewert, 2020, text copyright Tara Knudson, 2020. Courtesy of Zonderkidz.

With sunny yellows, tender-grass greens, and vibrant oranges, purples, and reds, Pauline Siewert drops kids as gently as an egg into dye into spring and the enchantment of Easter egg fun. White eggs marked with creative crayon designs will give readers a few ideas for their own eggs while the sweet smiles and enthusiasm of the bunny siblings and their parents mirror their own feelings. As the bunnies and their friends dash off to find the eggs, little ones will be just as excited for their own Easter egg traditions.

Adorable and endearing, Easter Egg Day will be a favorite spring read for adults and kids to share before Easter and to remember family fun.

Ages 2 – 4

Zonderkidz, 2020 | ISBN 978-0310767527

Discover more about Tara Knudson and her books on her website.

National Children’s Craft Day Activity

CPB - Chick single

Hatch a Chick! Craft

 

Chicks are so cute and fluffy—you just wish you could have one of your very own! Now you can! Hatch your own chick with this craft.

Supplies

  • Cotton balls, or use large pom-poms
  • Yellow chalk
  • Orange paper
  • Black paper
  • Egg shell
  • Paper grass
  • Cardboard or poster board
  • Cheese grater
  • Green paint, marker, or crayon
  • Glue
  • Scissors

Directions

To make the shell

  1. Crack an egg and save the two halves
  2. Soak the eggshells in soapy water or wash gently with soap
  3. Dry eggshell

To make the chick

  1. Use the cheese grater to grate the chalk into a bowl
  2. Roll the cotton balls in the chalk dust until they are covered
  3. Make the beak from the orange paper by folding the paper and cutting a small triangle
  4. Cut two small eyes from the black paper
  5. Glue the beak and eyes to one of the cotton balls
  6. Glue the head to the second cotton ball
  7. Set the chick into one of the eggshells, glue if desired

To make the stand

  1. Cut a 3-inch by 3-inch square from the cardboard or poster board
  2. If you wish, paint or color the square green
  3. Glue green paper grass to the square
  4. Glue the eggshell to the stand.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-easter-egg-day-cover

You can find Easter Egg Day at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 13 – National Reading Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-in-my-heart-cover

About the Holiday

Reading with your child every day gives you time to relax, giggle, talk, and enjoy some precious moments together. In fact, that’s what National Reading Month is all about! So grab some old favorites and new finds – like today’s book – and make treasured family memories.

In My Heart

Written by Mackenzie Porter | Illustrated by Jenny Løvlie

 

A little girl tiptoes into her mom’s room, giggling as she jumps on the bed and wakes her up. They have breakfast together and get ready for their day. Buckled into her car seat, the girl says, “‘Mama, I will miss you. What do you do all day?’” With loving words, her mom takes her through her day. She says, “First, before I go, my love, I give you a good-bye kiss. / Then as I am leaving, I remind myself of this: / Though we’re not together, / we’re never truly apart / because you’re always on my mind / and you’re always in my heart.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-in-my-heart-good-bye

Image copyright Jenny Løvlie, 2020, text copyright Mackenzie Porter, 2020. Courtesy of Little Simon.

Her daughter learns that her mom starts thinking about her as soon as she drops her off to spend the day with other kids. Driving to work, Mama listens to her little one’s favorite song and thinks about how she sings along. While participating in meetings, she wonders if her little girl is learning new things too. And at lunchtime she feels especially close as she thinks of them eating the same meal. As she doodles, she’s reminded of the drawings taped up around their house.

But while the day brings joy and sweet memories, this mom reassures her wondering child that her favorite part of the day is picking her up so they can spend the evening and nighttime together. “Once I hear your voice again / the whole world melts away. / The moment you say ‘Mama’ is what I’ve waited for all day.”  

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-in-my-heart-hearts

Image copyright Jenny Løvlie, 2020, text copyright Mackenzie Porter, 2020. Courtesy of Little Simon.

For little ones missing Mom during the day, Mackenzie Porter’s lyrical story simply and beautifully connects a child’s experiences at daycare or school with their mother’s day at work. Examples familiar to all kids reassure them that throughout the day their mom is thinking about them and looking forward to being together again. Porter’s sweet repeated verse gives kids an easy-to-memorize reminder of their mother’s love to comfort them when they experience those pangs of separation. For working moms, In My Heart lets them share that they too feel those pangs but are always and forever bonded with their child.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-in-my-heart-lunch

Image copyright Jenny Løvlie, 2020, text copyright Mackenzie Porter, 2020. Courtesy of Little Simon.

Jenny Løvlie’s soothing colors and joyful scenes of mother-and-child togetherness create a tranquil reading experience that moms and their little ones will love to share. Hugs, hand-holding, gentle caresses, and mirrored smiles demonstrate the strong and caring relationship between the two. Facing pages portraying mom at the office and the little girl at daycare or school show that they are each independent yet connected by thoughts and their mutual love.

A delightful and poignant book that is sure to become a daily read, In My Heart would be a favorite addition to home bookshelves and school and library collections.

Ages Baby and Up

Little Simon, 2020 | ISBN 978-1534454330

To learn more about Jenny Løvlie, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Reading Month Activity

CPB - Heart Jar

Jar Full of Love

 

With this easy-to-make craft your child can see the love that’s in your heart. Whether you fill it up right away or add to it a day at a time, just looking at this jar will make your child happy. 

Supplies

  • A clear jar with a lid—you can use a recyclable plastic or glass jar or buy a mason jar or other decorative jar at a craft store
  • Red felt
  • Scissors

Directions

1. Cut red hearts from the felt

2. Add hearts to the jar in a way that’s meaningful to you and your child. Here are some ideas:

  • Fill the jar all the way to the top to show your child how your heart overflows with love for them
  • Add one heart every day. As you and your child put it in the jar, talk about a time during the day that you thought about each other.
  • Add one heart for each thing you love about your child, Write one trait on each heart
  • Add a heart each time you do something fun together

3. Display the jar in your child’s room or somewhere else they can see it

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-in-my-heart-cover

You can find In My Heart at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 12 – It’s Women’s History Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-lady-cover

About the Holiday

National Women’s History Month is all about celebrating women who broke barriers with their intelligence, creativity, courage, persistence, and unwavering confidence in their abilities. In every discipline, women have brought and continue to bring new perspectives, experiences, and talents to make contributions toward a better world. Celebrate this month-long holiday by reading about some women pioneers in all areas. Today’s book is a great place to start!

By Jakki Licare

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist

Written by Jess Keating | Illustrated by Marta Álvarez Miguéns

 

Eugenie’s favorite place was the aquarium. She loved the smell, the colors of the fish, but most of all she loved the sharks. Eugenie wondered what it would be like to live underwater and swim with the sharks. She had to find out. In the summer, Eugenie’s mother took her to Atlantic City. “Stuffing sticky gum into her ears to keep the water out, Eugenie dove, … down, …down, …down.” She pretended to be a shark swimming strong through water. 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-lady-aquarium

Image copyright Marta Álvarez Miguéns, 2017, text copyright Jess Keating, 2017. Courtesy of Sourcebooks Explore.

Most people were scared of sharks, but Eugenie thought they were magnificent.  She was determined to learn more about them. “So she dove…this time into books.” At the library she learned about every shark she could find. She also became Queens County Aquarium Society’s youngest member. While Eugenie’s mother couldn’t give her a pet shark, she did surprise Eugenie with a fifteen gallon fish tank. Eugenie bought guppies, clown fish and snails. 

As Eugenie grew older she decided to become a zoologist, but many professors didn’t encourage her. Most thought women couldn’t and shouldn’t be scientists. “Eugenie knew better. Her dream was as big as a whale shark. So again, Eugenie dove.” She studied hard and rose to the top of her field. 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-lady-diving

Image copyright Marta Álvarez Miguéns, 2017, text copyright Jess Keating, 2017. Courtesy of Sourcebooks Explore.

Eugenie was ready to finally dive into the ocean. In the red sea, she discovered three new species. In the Palau Islands, Eugenie finally saw her first wild shark. It was beautiful. At the time many believed sharks had to always be moving to stay alive, but Eugenie discovered caves with sharks resting together. “Eugenie had proven she was smart enough to be a scientist and brave enough to explore the oceans.”

Still most of the world believed sharks to be dangerous and hunting sharks was very common. Eugenie wanted to prove to the world that sharks weren’t ‘mindless killers.’ Eugenie created an experiment where she would train a shark to push a target. It was a success! Sharks even remembered their training two months later. Eugenie proved that sharks were smart and deserved to be protected. 

Facts about sharks, a detailed timeline of Eugenie Clark’s life, and an Author’s Note follow the text.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-lady-library

Image copyright Marta Álvarez Miguéns, 2017, text copyright Jess Keating, 2017. Courtesy of Sourcebooks Explore.

Jess Keating’s straightforward manner of writing really homes in on the  struggles and successes of Eugenie Clark. Keating adds in splashes of nautical language,  making this a fun and engaging read. Eugenie’s fight for gender equality was a strong theme that ties in nicely with the world’s misunderstanding of the sharks that Eugenie loved. In Eugenie’s college years, Keating writes how people tried to convince Clark to be a secretary or housewife and poignantly points out that even after she earned her degree many still doubted her ability. Young readers can see how Eugenie didn’t let that stop her from doing what she was meant to do.

Keating emphasizes not only Clark’s passion, but her hard work and courage in a variety of situations as well. The picture book begins with Clark’s passion for sharks and then transitions to the brave girl trying to deep dive with bubble gum in her ears. Later, Keating shows the reader how hard Eugenie worked to earn her degree and how brave she was to deep dive alone. The conclusion of the book  circles back to her passion to protect her beloved sharks’ through scientific experiments. Kids with any passion can see how hard work and perseverance can create a huge impact on the world.  

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-lady-ear-plugs

Image copyright Marta Álvarez Miguéns, 2017, text copyright Jess Keating, 2017. Courtesy of Sourcebooks Explore.

Marta Álvarez Miguéns’ illustrations are beautiful and whimsical. Bright blues and greens invite you to dive right in.  Sharks swim through the library aisles while Eugenie reads and tag along with her through her aquarium trip. The illustrations do a great job of reinforcing Clark’s determination and courage. In the college classrooms Miguéns depicts Eugenie as the only girl in the lecture hall. She depicts her with squinty eyed determination; taking notes while the rest of her classmates look bored. Eugenie is also illustrated bravely diving alone with sharks.

The sharks’ large eyes make the sharks feel friendly and encourages the readers to give them a chance as well. In the conclusion of the book, Miguéns shows Eugenie standing next to a little girl who looks happily at the sharks. This illustration emphasizes the fact that Clark’s scientific achievements have given younger generations the chance to enjoy sharks as well.  The end pages are covered with realistic depictions of different types of sharks and nautical sea creatures, allowing those less familiar with these animals to analyze and compare.

Shark Lady is not just for shark enthusiast. This wonderful book shows us  that any dream is possible with hard work and perseverance. It would make an inspiring addition to home, school, and public library collections.

 Ages 4 – 8 and up

Sourcebooks Explore, 2017 | ISBN 978-1492642046 (Hardcover) | Scholastic, 2018 ISBN 978-1338271478 (Paperback)

Discover more about Jess Keating and her books and illustrations on her website.

To learn more about Marta Álvarez Miguéns, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Women’s History Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-fin-craft

Fintastic Shark Fun

 

Eugenie wanted to swim with the sharks and now you can too! Follow the directions below and to make your own shark fin. 

Supplies

  • 2 pieces of 8.5 x 11 gray cardstock paper
  • Ribbon
  • Tape
  • Scissors
  • Pencil

fin outline white

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-fin

Directions

  1. Tape the top of the two pieces of paper together
  2. Fold them back together
  3. Measure an inch up from the bottom of the papers (the un-taped side) and trace a straight line across both papers
  4. Trace a shark fin outline onto your paper. The shark outline should stop an inch above the bottom
  5. Cut out the fin on both pieces of paper. If you should cut through the tape, re-tape the tops together
  6. Fold along the lines of both papers so the folds face towards each other.
  7. Tape the folds so the fin becomes a triangle
  8. Cut two slits parallel to the folded lines
  9. Thread ribbon through slits

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shark-lady-cover

You can find Shark Lady at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

March 11 – COVER REVEAL!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-comet-the unstoppable-reindeer-cover

From a New York Times bestselling author with over fifteen million books in print, the hilarious story of an injury-prone reindeer who saves Christmas:

Comet, the Unstoppable Reindeer

By Jim Benton

 

It’s the night before Christmas, and Comet is ready…until he’s injured in an unexpected elf incident and replaced by a rookie named Freddy.

Comet can’t believe his bad luck. Then he realizes something even worse—in all the confusion, Santa has left the toys behind and isn’t answering his phone. Injury and all, Comet sets out to deliver the presents, crisscrossing the globe from Japan and Egypt to France and Cleveland. After a run-in with a goose, a near miss with a minivan, and too many chimney crash landings to count, can Comet hobble his way into pulling off a Christmas miracle?

Ages 3 – 7 

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542043472

Comet, the Unstoppable Reindeer will be released on September 15. The book is now available to preorder.

About the Author

Jim Benton Photo

Photo by Laurie Tennent

Jim Benton is the award-winning creator of the New York Times bestselling series Dear Dumb Diary and Franny K. Stein as well as the popular It’s Happy Bunny brand. His books have sold more than fifteen million copies in twenty-five countries and have garnered numerous honors. Like Comet, Jim knows what it’s like to hobble around in a cast; however, he is still learning to fly. Find out more about him at www.jimbenton.com.

You can connect with Jim Benton on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-comet-the unstoppable-reindeer-cover

You can preorder Comet, the Unstoppable Reindeer on Amazon.