March 31 – National Crayon Day

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About the Holiday

If the aroma of crayons takes you back to your childhood or means that you know your kids are having fun and being creative, then today’s holiday is for you! Invented in 1902 by Edwin Binney, the Crayola crayon is a staple of young artists everywhere. With 120 different colors. many with imaginative names, everyone has a favorite color. What’s yours?

I received a copy of The Forgotten Crayon from Minedition for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

By Jakki Licare

The Forgotten Crayon

By Yoko Maruyama

 

Twelve brand new crayons are waiting at the store for someone to choose them. They are excited to find out who their new owner will be. The crayons are thrilled when they feel their box moving. They are finally going home. In his room, their new owner, Lucas, opens the lid and smiles down at the crayons.

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Copyright Yoko Maruyama, 2020. Courtesy of minedition.

Lucas uses a light green crayon to color grass. Then, he uses a brown crayon to draw a tree. Using the dark green and pink crayons, he adds in flowers and leaves for a springtime picture. “Those three crayons returned to the box a little shorter, but they seemed very happy.”

When summer comes, Lucas draws an ocean with a light blue crayon and makes a sail boat with the dark blue crayon. Even though the crayons are shorter, they return to the box happy. Fall comes and Lucas makes a Halloween picture using the orange, red, yellow, and black crayons. Happy to have been chosen, the crayons return to their box. “Day after day Lucas colored picture after picture, but he never chose the white crayon.”

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Copyright Yoko Maruyama, 2020. Courtesy of minedition.

Around winter time, Lucas tells his mom that he would like a new box of crayons. The white crayon, towering over his shorter boxmates is very upset that he was never used. One day Lucas’s family holds a yard sale, and the old box of crayons is put out with the rest of the unwanted items. People come by taking this and that, but nobody is interested in the crayons. Lucas’s mother tells him that if no one takes them then they will throw away the crayons. 

“As it grew later and darker, the crayons started to feel so sad they were near to tears.” Just when they feel certain they are going to be thrown out, a little girl opens them up. She is so excited. There is a brand-new white crayon in the box! “She cradled the old crayon box all the way home.”

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Copyright Yoko Maruyama, 2020. Courtesy of minedition.

Their new owner, Olivia, always starts her pictures with a white crayon. Then, using water colors, she paints the paper. The white crayon’s wax prevents the watercolors from sticking to it. So, wherever Olivia had used the white crayon, it remains white. She paints white stars in the sky, blue seas with white jellyfish, and forests with white unicorns. When the first snow of the year comes, “Olivia drew a picture using mostly the white crayon.” Returning to the box, the white crayon is now much shorter and all the crayons are happy.

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Copyright Yoko Maruyama, 2020. Courtesy of minedition.

 Yoko Maruyama’s soft-toned illustrations nicely complement her gentle narrative. The story starts off in a dark, quiet box where the colorful, tall, and happy crayons are waiting to be bought at the store. Her hopeful words, “Their hearts were filled with expectation,” start the story off on a happy and peaceful note.  The book ends with the crayons in the dark box once again, but this time they are all shorter and happy to have been chosen. 

The message of inclusivity is a beautiful theme woven throughout the book. Maruyama returns to the inside of the box several times, illustrating how the white crayon is the only crayon that doesn’t get used. The tall white crayon sticks out compared to the more colorful and shorter crayons. The white crayon’s simplistic sad face makes it easy for young readers to understand that the white crayon is sad from being excluded. Then, later Maruyama shows the white crayon smiling along with the rest of the crayons, shorter and happier from being included.

While a third of the book’s illustration take place inside the crayon box, Maruyama has created a beautiful tale about thinking outside the box. Olivia’s unique way of using the white crayon’s wax is very different from the way Lucas had created his drawings. Maruyama’s clever illustrations displaying crayon-resistant art can easily be replicated by young readers. The illustrations throughout the book play on the use of white space as well. The dark interior of the crayon box contrasts with bright light that appears when Olivia or Lucas open the box. This technique is also featured in the human world. For example, in Olivia’s house the dark interior contrasts sharply with the white snow outside.

My son loves this book! It has been in nightly rotation since we first read it a week ago. The Forgotten Crayon is a great book for helping children understand the importance of inclusivity and makes a creative addition for home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 5-8

minedition,  2020 |  ISBN 978-9888341986

National Crayon Day Activity

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Jellyfish Painting

Have fun recreating Olivia’s jellyfish painting from your own crayon box! 

Supplies

Directions

  1. Print out stencil template
  2. Starting in the center of each figure cut out the jellyfish and the fish
  3. Place template on paper. Using your white crayon, trace and color in your jellyfish and fish
  4. Use blue watercolors and paint your paper
  5. Let dry

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You can find The Forgotten Crayon at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 30 – National Women’s History Month

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About the Holiday

Women have been inventing, discovering, questioning, challenging, and changing the world in the same ways and for just as long as men have—but often without recognition, the ability to take jobs in their fields of expertise, or equal (or even any) pay. This month’s observance serves to educate people on the amazing women who have blazed trails in the past and those who are continuing that tradition today. As we close out National Women’s History Month, we take a look at a book about one woman who has broken many barriers throughout her life and continues to inspire children and adults.

Blast off into Space Like Mae Jemison (Work It, Girl! series)

Written by Caroline Moss | Illustrated by Sinem Erkas

Focused, intelligent, courageous, and giving, astronaut Mae Jemison is an inspiration to millions of kids and adults around the world. Through her captivating biography, Caroline Moss introduces readers to this accomplished woman in ten engrossing chapters that, through pivotal events, dialogue, and thoughts, reveal Mae’s dreams, motivations, and triumphs. Paced in short, impactful chapters, this biography reads like a novel yet imparts factual information that will entice readers to learn more about Mae Jemison and careers in science.

Sinem Erkas punctuates this personal narrative with her stirring 3-D cut paper artwork. Vivid colors and  action-packed imagery, take readers along on Mae’s journey from childhood dreams of “sailing off into space on a rocket ship” to the day she fulfills that dream and beyond. Images of Mae completing experiments in college and medical school as well as detailed depictions of Mae inside the space shuttle working and interacting with other astronauts will have children lingering over the pages.

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Image copyright Sinem Erkes, 2020, text copyright Caroline Moss, 2020. Courtesy of Frances Lincoln Children’s Books.

In the first chapter, children meet Mae as a young girl and her parents who took her dreams seriously, instilled in her a strong work ethic, and guided her on her way to the stars. Is a splinter science? In Chapter 2, readers learn how an infected injury led Mae and her mom to “do a science experiment with the infection” that taught her “so much about doctors and science and health…. Mae was also excited to realize this was something that truly interested her.” Excited to share her research and discovery at school, Mae instead felt those first feelings of doubt when her teacher discouraged her goal of becoming a scientist.

In Chapter 3, children sit in on this class, but also follow 9-year-old Mae home, where her mom tells her “‘It does not matter what anyone thinks…. What matters is that you work hard, set goals, and do your best to achieve them. What matters is that you believe in yourself.” It’s also at this time that Mae watched the Apollo moon landing and thought that maybe someday she go into space too.

When she was 11, Mae discovered dance. She not only discovered it, she discovered she loved it and was good at it. Would Mae decide to become a dancer instead of a scientist? Or, Mae wondered, could she do both? Her mom gave her a bit of perspective that made sense to Mae and “helped her to prioritize her goals and dreams.” What was that advice? You can read about it in Chapter 4.

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Image copyright Sinem Erkes, 2020, text copyright Caroline Moss, 2020. Courtesy of Frances Lincoln Children’s Books.

In Chapters 5 and 6, Mae is getting closer to her goal as she goes off to Stanford University at age 16 and then on to medical school at Cornell University, from which she graduated as a Doctor of Medicine in 1981. After grad school, Mae spent a few years in the Peace Corps overseas. When she came back, she learned that “NASA was accepting applications for astronauts. She thought of Sally Ride, a trailblazer; the first American woman in space. She was inspired.” The application was long, and so was the wait to hear back. When she finally got the letter and tore it open, she learned that “out of 2,000 people, she had been accepted to the NASA astronaut program!” She also “realized quickly that out of the fifteen people selected for the 1987 NASA program, she was both the only Black person and the only Black woman.” After her training, she was given a job in the Cape Canaveral, Florida, Kennedy Space Center, “using her math and science knowledge to work with software for shuttles.”

You know that Mae Jemison did go into space, so when does she blast off? In Chapter 7! Young future astronauts will discover what she did before that momentous trip, and in Chapter 8, they’ll read about microgravity, what experiments Mae worked on, how she slept strapped to the wall, what she ate, and other details of her eight days in space.

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Image copyright Sinem Erkes, 2020, text copyright Caroline Moss, 2020. Courtesy of Frances Lincoln Children’s Books.

Chapter 9 relates what Mae has done after leaving NASA. Her teaching career and the Dorothy Jemison Foundation she began were fostered by “a pull inside her to get in front of young people to impart this wisdom. She wanted to create a better world than the one she lived in as a little girl. She wanted kids, especially girls, to know that the world needed them, and the world of science definitely needed them.” As the leader of NASA’s 100 Year Starship Program, Mae’s doing just that. Read about it and be inspired to shoot for your own stars in Chapter 10.

Quotes by Mae Jemison and motivational snapshots are highlighted throughout the text. Back matter includes ten key lessons from Mae Jemison’s life on becoming a leader, questions to prompt kids to think about science, their passions, staying motivated, making a difference, and what they want their legacy to be. There is also a list of books, websites, and organizations for further reading and exploration.

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Image copyright Sinem Erkes, 2020, text copyright Caroline Moss, 2020. Courtesy of Frances Lincoln Children’s Books.

Compelling and personal, Blast off into Space Like Mae Jemison is a biography young readers won’t be able to put down. The book is highly recommended for homeschooling and home libraries as well as for school and public library collections.

Ages 8 – 12

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-0711245150

Discover more abouCaroline Moss and her books on her website.

To learn more about Sinem Erkas, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Women’s History Month Activity

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Out-of-this-World Tic-Tac-Toe Game

 

You can launch your own Tic-Tac-Toe Game with this set you make yourself! With just a couple of egg cartons, some crayons, and a printable game board, you’ll be off to the moon for some fun! Opposing players can be designated by rockets and capsules. Each player will need 5 playing pieces. 

SUPPLIES

  • Printable Moon Tic-Tac-Toe Game Board
  • 2 cardboard egg cartons
  • Heavy stock paper or regular printer paper
  • Crayons
  • Black or gray fine-tip marker

DIRECTIONS

To Make the Rockets

  1. Cut the tall center cones from the egg carton
  2. Trim the bottoms of each form so they stand steadily, leaving the arched corners intact
  3. Pencil in a circular window on one side near the top of the cone
  4. Color the rocket body any colors you like, going around the window and stopping where the arched corners begin
  5. With the marker color the arched corners of the form to make legs
  6. On the cardboard between the legs, color flames for blast off

To Make the Capsule

  1. Cut the egg cups from an egg carton
  2. Color the sides silver, leaving the curved section uncolored. (If your egg cup has no pre-pressed curve on the sides of the cup, draw one on each side.)
  3. Color the curved section yellow to make windows
  4. With the marker, dot “rivets” across the capsule

Print the Moon Game Board and play!

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You can find Blast off into Space Like Mae Jemison at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 27 – National Reading Month: Rosie: Stronger than Steel Book Tour Stop

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About the Holiday

The month of March is dedicated to reading—an initiative that’s taken on new importance as parents and caregivers search for resources for homeschooling and to share family time. Authors, illustrators, teachers, librarians, publishers, and others in the publishing and education fields are finding new ways to connect with readers and bring them the books they love. Today, I’m happy to be taking part in a book tour for Rosie: Stronger than Steel, an original look at another momentous time in history that brought people together to work for the good of all.

I received a copy of Rosie: Stronger than Steel from Two Lions for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Rosie: Stronger than Steel

By Lindsay Ward

 

Rosie, a tractor built during World War II, reveals what she’s made of as her story begins: “Refrigerators, fences, old cars, and a toaster… all melted down to build me up strong.” In the factory four women weld and rivet Rosie together. As they work on her they sing…”This is our Rosie, / stronger than steel. / She’ll plow all the land / with a turn of her wheel.” A finishing touch—a single red rose—is painted on, and Rosie offers a promise: “I’ll plow and I’ll dig. / I’ll dig and I’ll plow. / No matter the job, / this is my vow.”

Then Rosie is sent out, traveling by air, ship, truck, and train to a farm far away. The fields are overgrown—in need of Rosie’s expertise. Rosie is happy to get to work, churning the ground so that the Land Girls can plant seeds to grow crops—“wheat and barley. Oats and potatoes. Sugar beets, currants, apples, tomatoes.”—to support the war effort.

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Copyright Lindsay Ward, 2020, courtesy of Two Lions.

Some days Rosie toiled in the shadow of a war plane, her green body hiding among the green crops. But she never faltered, always singing to herself promise she made to the women who built her. Year after year “more crops were needed! Load after load, sent out to the troops. To feed them. To help them. To win the war!”

Rosie did more than plow. She was hitched to wagons that carried milk and wool and hauled bushels and bushels of apples. She trudged uphill with logs to be converted into supplies. And then one day Rosie heard cheers ringing out across the farm. “The celebration spread throughout the world. The war was over!”

As time passed, new-model tractors joined Rosie on the farm. And then came the day when Rosie sputtered to a halt. She was taken to the barn, where the farmers tinkered and brought her back to life. Now Rosie had rubber tires and new paint, and the little rose had blossomed to fill her hood. Rosie was back, working the farm but never forgetting her promise to the women who built her and her fight for freedom.

In an extensive Author’s Note and accompanying timeline, Lindsay Ward talks about the inspiration behind her story, the work of women in factories during World War II in the US, and the Women’s Land Army in England. She also reveals fascinating facts about tractors built by Ford Motor Company and sent to England. Ward also includes a list of resources for those interested in learning more.

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Copyright Lindsay Ward, 2020, courtesy of Two Lions.

Lindsay Ward introduces children to the heroism and sacrifice displayed during World War II through her unique story. Told from the perspective of a tractor built by women factory workers in the United States and shipped to a British farm supplying food for the troops, Ward’s story reveals details of the time period that children may not know but that will make an impact: In the first page spread, children see women lined up with donations for the scrap metal collection—not only cans and unneeded items, but toasters and bed frames too. The reason for Rosie’s green paint—a familiar color for tractors—also becomes apparent later in the story.

With the war’s end and the passage of time, Ward demonstrates the return to normalcy and progress again through tractors—Rosie, who acquires rubber tires, and new, sleeker models. Straightforward storytelling describing Rosie’s origins and her hard work on the farm intermittently shares the page with Rosie’s inspiring rhymed promise to do any job necessary.

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Copyright Lindsay Ward, 2020, courtesy of Two Lions.

Ward’s colored pencil and cut paper illustrations evoke the 1940s and give Rosie a determined personality while maintaining a realistic view of the important work of these valuable machines. Green predominates, highlighting Rosie, reminding readers of the camouflaged troops she served, and spotlighting the crops she fostered while adding a touch of metaphorical depth in the idea of renewal. Images created from lined notebook paper hint at the importance of remembering history through stories, and other choices of paper add texture and interest.

An excellent story to add to lessons on World War II, women’s history, American history, farming, and industry as well as for children interested in vehicles and machinery, Rosie: Stronger than Steel would be an inspirational addition to home, school, and public library collections.

To learn more about Lindsay Ward, her books, and her art, visit her website.

For a Learn to Draw Rosie Activity Sheet, visit Lindsay’s Rosie: Stronger than Steel page.

Ages 4 – 8 

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542017947

National Reading Month Activity

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Build a Tractor Jigsaw Puzzle

 

With this printable jigsaw puzzle, you can color and build a tractor of your own! Just print the Tractor Template, color, cut, and have fun putting it together!

Supplies

  • Printable Tractor Template
  • Card stock paper, poster board, or cardboard (optional)
  • Colored pencils or crayons
  • Scissors
  • Glue (optional)
  • Tape (optional)

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Directions

  1. Print the Tractor Template. For a sturdier puzzle, print on card stock or glue the pieces to poster board or cardboard before cutting.
  2. Color and cut out the pieces
  3. Put the tractor together

Optional Game

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If you’d like to play with your tractor, you can print this Vegetable Garden Game.

  1. To use your tractor to play with the game, tape the pieces together.
  2. Then pretend to plow and plant your garden then play the game with the directions provided.

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You can find Rosie: Stronger than Steel at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

March 26 – It’s Rising Star Month

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About the Holiday

Are you a rising star? Of course, you are! What is a rising star? It’s someone who shows great promise for the future. That sounds like you, right? Today, celebrate all of your special talents and knowledge that will take you far as you grow up. How far? Well, why not shoot for the stars? Get started on a new learning journey about those stars with today’s book.

Animals in the Sky

By Sara Gillingham

 

The weather’s warmer and the sky is dark. From your window or in backyard you can look up and find… what? Little ones know the sky is “filled with twinkling stars.” But do they “know that it’s full of pictures too?” Just like a dot-to-dot puzzle, “if you draw lines between some of the brightest stars, you can find animals.” These animals and other pictures made from stars have a special name: constellations. Youngest astronomers will shine while putting their scientific minds to work on the riddles that accompany each constellation and discovering the answer. Let’s take a look at a couple of them.

Riddle: “I have thick, shiny fur, and large, padded feet. I the winter, I like to take a long sleep in my warm den. What animal in the sky am I?”

If your little one guesses “a bear,” they’ll be grr-atified to learn that they’re right! In reward they learn about another well-known constellation that is part of the Big Bear.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2020, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Ready to try another one? Terrific! Riddle: “I have a tail that wags when I’m happy, a big wet nose, and a loud bark. What animal in the sky am I?” Anyone lucky to have one of these for a pet will know right away that connecting these stars makes the Big Dog. But readers will also discover the name of the that right where his dog tag would be is “the brightest star in the whole sky”––Sirius.

Five more clever riddles and facts about the Rabbit, the Lion, the Southern Fish, the Eagle, and the Wolf also await star-struck kids. A fold-out page at the back depicts ten more constellations named for favorite animals.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2020, courtesy of Phaidon Press.

Sara Gillingham introduces the youngest stargazers to twenty animal constellations that will pique their interest in astronomy and all things space related. Her lyrical riddles for seven constellations give kids clues to their names with evocative descriptions that not only lead readers to the right answer but reveal facts about the real animals in nature. Her stylish presentation of connected stars on a navy-blue background, as crystal clear as a cloudless night, allows little ones to easily see the basic formation of the constellation. The page then folds out, and the outline is superimposed with an image of the animal inspired by the shape. The third page goes on to show the two floating in a star-sprinkled sky along with another interesting tidbit of information.

With a gold-embossed cover and sturdy pages, Animals in the Sky is fun to share for nighttime star gazing and as a spark for lessons on astronomy, science, space, history, and mythology. The book would make a beautiful gift for new babies, baby showers, new little siblings as well as a go-to favorite for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 2 – 5

Phaidon Press, 2020 | ISBN 978-1838660246

Older children will enjoy the stunning Seeing Stars: A Complete Guide to the 88 Constellations, also by Sara Gillingham. You can read my review here.

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You can find Seeing Stars: A Complete Guide to the 88 Constellations at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Phaidon Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714877723

To learn more about Sara Gillingham, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Rising Star Month Activity

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Courtesy of education.com

Star Gazing Dot-to-Dot

 

What constellation do these kids see in the sky? Print and follow the dots to find out. Then color the picture! Then enjoy another page filled with star-studded fun!

Star Gazing Dot-to-Dot | Constellations Dot-to-Dot

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Older children will enjoy this printable Read the Stars Constellations Word Search

Read the Stars Word Search Puzzle | Read the Stars Word Search Solution

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You can find Animals in the Sky at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 25 – National Little Red Wagon Day

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About the Holiday

In 2016 Radio Flyer established today’s holiday in anticipation of its 100th anniversary in 2017. That’s one hundred years of children enjoying the imaginative outdoor play a little red wagon provides! Whether kids are transporting their siblings, giving their pets or toys a ride, helping out in the garden, or participating in a community parade, the red wagon has been at the center of the action and a plaything that gets passed down from parent to child as a family grows. If you have little ones in your family, celebrate today by taking a little red wagon – or any wagon – for a spin.

Red Wagon

By Renata Liwska

 

When Lucy got a new red wagon, “she wanted to play with it immediately.” Her mother thought she could take her wagon to the market. That didn’t sound like much fun to Lucy, but she headed to the market with a list anyway.

When she came to the big hill, her friends Hedgehog and Squirrel jumped in. That made the wagon “pretty heavy.” Fortunately, Rabbit came along to help push. At the top of the hill, they stopped for a snack with Bird and Raccoon, but “it started to rain! Oh, brother.” Lucy pushed the wagon to the bottom of the hill, but by now the rain was a torrent. That was okay, though, as the wagon had transformed into a ship, and Raccoon, in his umbrella, had become a pirate captain.

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Copyright Renata Liwska, 2013, courtesy of Philomel Books.com.

When the rain stopped, the friends went on their way in their red Conestoga wagon. Bunny, in his ten gallon hat, pushed while Sheriff Lucy pulled. Hedgehog held the reins, and Raccoon road her horse alongside. “At last Lucy arrived at the market.” As Hedgehog rolled their circus wagon into the center, Bunny toddled tall on stilts, Lucy juggled rings, and Raccoon blew a horn.

Lucy gathered all the vegetables on her mother’s list and started toward home. The train engine chugged, pulling the vegetable car up the steep hill. They were almost home “when the wagon hit a rock” and rocketed into space amid vegetable planets. When they landed, Lucy “gathered the vegetables and put them back into her wagon.

Lucy’s mom was happy to see her when she got home and thanked her happily for helping. “Finally, Lucy was free to play with her wagon,” which now made a perfect spot for a nap.

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Copyright Renata Liwska, 2013, courtesy of Philomel Books.com.

Snuggling up with your little one and Renata Liwska’s Red Wagon is such a sweet way to spend story time. As young children so often do, adorable Lucy turns a chore into imaginative playtime as she and her friends rapidly use mishaps, bumps, and their changing surroundings as springboards for their supple creativity.  Liwska’s simple story is the perfect frame for her beautiful, soft-hued, and detailed art as this group of cute friends become cowboys and cowgirls, sailors, pioneers, circus performers, and mom’s helpers.

A rich story for the youngest readers, Red Wagon would be a perfect baby gift and a much-loved addition to any toddler’s bookshelf.

Ages 1 – 3

Philomel Books, 2013 | ISBN 978-0399162398 (Board Book)

To view a portfolio of books by Renata Liwska, visit her website.

National Little Red Wagon Day Activity

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Take a Ride in the Little Red Wagon Maze

 

Everyone wants to ride in the wagon. Can you help these friends find their way in this printable maze?

Take a Ride in the Little Red Wagon Maze | Take a Ride in the Little Red Wagon Maze Solution

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You can find Red Wagon at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 24 – International Day for Achievers

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About the Holiday

Today we celebrate those who set goals and then work towards achieving them in any field. Particularly, it is a day to honor those unsung heroes who make the world a better place: teachers, scientists, doctors, nurses, conservationists, your hometown business owners, and many others who improve the lives of other people. To partake in today’s holiday, think about those people who have made a difference in your life, and if you can give them a call, send a text, or write an email and thank them, letting them know how much they mean to you.

The Big Book of Super Powers

Written by Susanna Isern | Illustrated by Rocio Bonilla

 

We all have our favorite superhero or two. Someone with a cape or cool costume who has extraordinary eyesight or flexibility or strength. But did you know that you are a superhero too? And that every day as you talk to your friends, help out at home, and do your schoolwork that you’re performing superhuman feats? Like what? Well, like the eighteen superpowers the kids have in today’s book. Some of them may not sound like super powers, but they are! Let’s take a look at some of them!

Marc is always smiling. “He walks with a spring in his step, humming a happy song to himself.” For him the glass is always half full, never half empty. And if it starts raining? “Marc grabs an umbrella and gets on his bicycle. He pedals and pedals until he finds the sunlight.” What do you think Marc’s superpower is? ** The answer is at the end of this post.

Lucía loves to laugh whether it’s at a funny joke or she’s slipped on a banana peel. “If a bird leaves a little ‘gift’ in her hair, she thinks that’s a sign of good luck.” She’s a clever “but always harmless” prankster, and she always has “brilliant ideas to deal with small problems with laughter and good cheer.” What do you think Lucía’s superpower is?**

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Image copyright Rocio Bonilla, 2020, text copyright Susanna Isern, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Alberto remembers everything. Really! Tell him your phone number or address, and it’s in his brain forever. Every detail is tucked away for later. Want to know “the colors of all the socks of all the students in his class” or “the names of all the dogs on his block?” Alberto can tell you just like that. Alberto can also learn lots things to help with school, at home, and his friends and family. What would you say Alberto’s superpower is?**

Sofia is a planner and can put everything in its place so she can find it again lickety-split. Looking for a tiny bead, a book, a favorite toy? Sofia knows just where it is. She can also put together a party that “everyone wants to attend” with activities and treats that everyone will enjoy. “But best of all, Sofia can plan her weekly schedule so well that she always has time left over to read, play, rest, or visit her friends. What could Sofia’s superpower be?**

You might have one of these superpowers, or maybe you have one of the other twelve awesome abilities in this book. It’s possible—even probable!—that you don’t have just one superpower, either, but lots of them. Discover what makes you extraordinary—no cape required!

Back matter includes a list of the eighteen superpowers in the book with an invitation to check off which ones the reader has. There’s also a prompt for readers to think about their own superpowers and write a story about themselves that’s similar to the stories in the book.

What is Each Child’s Superpower?

Marc’s superpower is Optimism | Lucía’s superpower is Humor | Alberto’s superpower is Memory | Sophia’s superpower is Organization

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Image copyright Rocio Bonilla, 2020, text copyright Susanna Isern, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Susanna Isern inspires kids to think of their special talents and aspects of their personalities as what they are: powers that will take them far and help them change their world. The eighteen examples of superpowers that Isern presents will have children exclaiming, “I didn’t know that was a superpower!” and “I can do that!” while gaining self-confidence and self-assurance. Her stories about each child are full of lyrical language and creative details that will resonate with readers about themselves and others they know. A wide range of children’s experiences found throughout the stories gives readers an opportunity to talk about how people develop some of the traits that become their superpowers and how others natural parts of their personality.

Rocio Bonilla’s lively mixed-media illustrations are full of humor, imaginative perspectives, and kids being kids while engaging in their superpower. Readers will love lingering over the pages and talking about how the particular images reflect each superpower. The collage illustrations may inspire kids to create their own collages made up of images that reflect their lives and their superpowers.

A thoughtful book for helping children develop self-esteem and an appreciation for their own and others’ unique talents, The Big Book of Superpowers makes an original and captivating addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 5 – 8

Beaming Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1506463193

Discover more about Susanna Isern and her books on her website.

To learn more about Rocio Bonilla, her books, and her art, visit her website.

International Day for Achievers Activity

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Reading is Super! Maze

 

Did you know that reading is an awesome superpower? This boy is a reading superhero. Can you help him through this printable Reading is Super Maze to reach his friends?

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You can find The Big Book of Superpowers at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

March 23 – National Cuddly Kittens Day

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*Tap Tap Tap* (Is this how my humans do it?) Meow! My name is Angus, and I am the picture book cat. I like sleeping, open windows, talking with my bird and squirrel friends, and above all books! For some reason, my whole family has been home all week! Which is purrfect for me because there are more people around to read me my favorite stories. According to my mom’s “catander” (that’s what that thing with all the squares is called, right?), today is National Cuddly Kittens Day! While she’s using that sticky roller on all of my favorite furniture, I’m going to share three of my favorite books about the most supurrlative animal in the world

About the Holiday

Today could be my very favorite holiday. Unless… is there a National Salmon Treats Day? No? Then today is my favorite holiday. We kittens (and cats – why should the kids get all the snuggles?) are cute and lovable, and just so, well…cuddly! How can you celebrate today with your kitten (or a cat!)? Be sure to give them plenty of scratches behind the ears and chin rubs and lots and lots of what I call “fluffins.” And when you sit down to relax don’t forget to leave some room between you and your laptop or book or knitting for your kitten (or cat!) to take a nap. Aaannd… don’t forget the salmon treats!

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Preview

“Are you in a tough spot? Has life got you down?” Perhaps you feel the need to be rescued by a superhero—you know the kind: strong, fast, and with an awesome costume. But maybe there’s an even better option for making your day brighter. What is it? It’s actually three things. Three soft, cuddly, BIG eyed “Emergency Kittens!” “Meet Mimi, Twee-Twee, and Adorbs! These three cuties make everything better!”

Angus’s Mewsings 

Of course they do! They are cats! This book is the cat’s pajamas! You can read my mom’s review here: Emergency Kittens

Ages 3 – 7

Doubleday Books for Young Readers, 2020 | ISBN 978-1984830081

Discover more about Jody Jensen Shaffer and her books on her website.

To learn more about Dave Mottram, his books, and his art, visit his website.

You can find Emergency Kittens! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

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Preview

See Max crouching under the chair? He’s getting ready to do what he does best: attack! On the table sits a bowl of fish. “Max’s paws are made for pounces. / Max’s legs are built for trounces.” He springs…he leaps… “but hold on….” On the screen door crawls a lizard watched with curiosity by the dog. In a moment Max is there: “Max one. Dog none.”

Angus’s Mewsings

Hahahahaha! Chalk one up for cats! No dog can outwit a cat! This book is the cat’s meow! You can read my mom’s review here: Max…Attacks

Ages 4 – 8

Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1481451468

Discover more about Kathi Appelt and her books on her website.

To learn more about Penelope Dullaghan, her books, and her art, visit her website.

You can find Max… Attacks at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

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Preview

Lola loved cats, and while she had a room full of stuffed cats in all colors and sizes, she wanted a real kitten of her own. Her mother told her that “looking after a cat is a lot of work.” Lola wanted to learn more, so Mommy took her to the library to get a book about cats. Lola learned lots of interesting information about cats and how to take care of them.

Finally, everything was ready. Lola and Mommy went back to the shelter. The kitten was afraid to go into the carrier at first, but including her own blanket made her feel safe. At home, Lola watched her new kitten explore her corner and new things. Lola named her cat Makeda, “the name of an African queen.” Every day, Lola took “excellent care of Makeda.”

Lola’s friend Ty was excited to meet Makeda and even brought her a present. Makeda now feels at home—especially when she’s cuddling with Lola! At night Lola reads a story to Makeda before bedtime. She loves Makeda, and reading to her “is the best of all.”

Angus’s Mewsings

This story is mew-sic to my ears! I came from a shelter too, and I love books as much as Makeda! This book is the cat’s whiskers! Read my mom’s review here: Lola Gets a Cat

Ages 2 – 5

Charlesbridge, 2017 | ISBN 978-1580897365 (Hardcover) | ISBN 978-1580897365 (Paperback)

Discover more about Anna McQuinn and her books on her website.

To learn more about Rosalind Beardshaw, her books, and her art, visit her website.

You can find Lola Gets a Cat at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Cuddly Kittens Day Activities

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A Little Ball of Kitten

 

This sweet little kitten is easy to make and can keep you company on your desk or shelf! Since every kitten is different, you can make yours to look just the way you want. Here’s how I made mine:

Supplies

  • Wooden ball with a flat bottom, available in craft stores and in different sizes
  • Craft paint in any color kitten you’d like (I used red and yellow and mixed it to make a mottled orange)
  • Craft paint in pink or white for the inner ear
  • Scrap of fleece for the ears. Fleece is easily shaped to the rounded ball and when painted is stiff enough to stand up on its own.
  • Thin, colored wire in several colors for the tail (string or twine, wrapped wire, fleece, stiff paper, and other materials could also be used)
  • Paint brush
  • Permanent marker for making the face
  • Hot glue gun or strong glue

Directions

  1. Paint the wooden ball and let dry
  2. Paint the scrap of fleece to match the wooden ball, let dry
  3. Cut out small triangular shapes for the ears. Round the bottom of the ears slightly so they fit the shape of the ball
  4. If making a tail from several colors of thin wire, twist them together, leaving one end untwisted
  5. With the glue gun or strong glue attach the ears to the top of the head
  6. With the glue gun attach the tail to the back of the wooden ball in the center near the base
  7. With the marker, draw eyes, nose, and mouth for the face and semicircles near the bottom for the paws

Match the Kittens Puzzle

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These kittens all have a twin, but they got mixed up while playing! Can you find the pairs again in this printable Match the Kittens Puzzle?

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I hope you’ve enjoyed my post! Now…to watch a few cute cat videos before my nap.

Picture Book Review