March 24 – International Day for Achievers

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About the Holiday

Today we celebrate those who set goals and then work towards achieving them in any field. Particularly, it is a day to honor those unsung heroes who make the world a better place: teachers, scientists, doctors, nurses, conservationists, your hometown business owners, and many others who improve the lives of other people. To partake in today’s holiday, think about those people who have made a difference in your life, and if you can give them a call, send a text, or write an email and thank them, letting them know how much they mean to you.

The Big Book of Super Powers

Written by Susanna Isern | Illustrated by Rocio Bonilla

 

We all have our favorite superhero or two. Someone with a cape or cool costume who has extraordinary eyesight or flexibility or strength. But did you know that you are a superhero too? And that every day as you talk to your friends, help out at home, and do your schoolwork that you’re performing superhuman feats? Like what? Well, like the eighteen superpowers the kids have in today’s book. Some of them may not sound like super powers, but they are! Let’s take a look at some of them!

Marc is always smiling. “He walks with a spring in his step, humming a happy song to himself.” For him the glass is always half full, never half empty. And if it starts raining? “Marc grabs an umbrella and gets on his bicycle. He pedals and pedals until he finds the sunlight.” What do you think Marc’s superpower is? ** The answer is at the end of this post.

Lucía loves to laugh whether it’s at a funny joke or she’s slipped on a banana peel. “If a bird leaves a little ‘gift’ in her hair, she thinks that’s a sign of good luck.” She’s a clever “but always harmless” prankster, and she always has “brilliant ideas to deal with small problems with laughter and good cheer.” What do you think Lucía’s superpower is?**

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-big-book-of-superpowers-music

Image copyright Rocio Bonilla, 2020, text copyright Susanna Isern, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Alberto remembers everything. Really! Tell him your phone number or address, and it’s in his brain forever. Every detail is tucked away for later. Want to know “the colors of all the socks of all the students in his class” or “the names of all the dogs on his block?” Alberto can tell you just like that. Alberto can also learn lots things to help with school, at home, and his friends and family. What would you say Alberto’s superpower is?**

Sofia is a planner and can put everything in its place so she can find it again lickety-split. Looking for a tiny bead, a book, a favorite toy? Sofia knows just where it is. She can also put together a party that “everyone wants to attend” with activities and treats that everyone will enjoy. “But best of all, Sofia can plan her weekly schedule so well that she always has time left over to read, play, rest, or visit her friends. What could Sofia’s superpower be?**

You might have one of these superpowers, or maybe you have one of the other twelve awesome abilities in this book. It’s possible—even probable!—that you don’t have just one superpower, either, but lots of them. Discover what makes you extraordinary—no cape required!

Back matter includes a list of the eighteen superpowers in the book with an invitation to check off which ones the reader has. There’s also a prompt for readers to think about their own superpowers and write a story about themselves that’s similar to the stories in the book.

What is Each Child’s Superpower?

Marc’s superpower is Optimism | Lucía’s superpower is Humor | Alberto’s superpower is Memory | Sophia’s superpower is Organization

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-big-book-of-superpowers-creativity

Image copyright Rocio Bonilla, 2020, text copyright Susanna Isern, 2020. Courtesy of Beaming Books.

Susanna Isern inspires kids to think of their special talents and aspects of their personalities as what they are: powers that will take them far and help them change their world. The eighteen examples of superpowers that Isern presents will have children exclaiming, “I didn’t know that was a superpower!” and “I can do that!” while gaining self-confidence and self-assurance. Her stories about each child are full of lyrical language and creative details that will resonate with readers about themselves and others they know. A wide range of children’s experiences found throughout the stories gives readers an opportunity to talk about how people develop some of the traits that become their superpowers and how others natural parts of their personality.

Rocio Bonilla’s lively mixed-media illustrations are full of humor, imaginative perspectives, and kids being kids while engaging in their superpower. Readers will love lingering over the pages and talking about how the particular images reflect each superpower. The collage illustrations may inspire kids to create their own collages made up of images that reflect their lives and their superpowers.

A thoughtful book for helping children develop self-esteem and an appreciation for their own and others’ unique talents, The Big Book of Superpowers makes an original and captivating addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 5 – 8

Beaming Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1506463193

Discover more about Susanna Isern and her books on her website.

To learn more about Rocio Bonilla, her books, and her art, visit her website.

International Day for Achievers Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-reading-is-super-maze

Reading is Super! Maze

 

Did you know that reading is an awesome superpower? This boy is a reading superhero. Can you help him through this printable Reading is Super Maze to reach his friends?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-big-book-of-superpowers-cover

You can find The Big Book of Superpowers at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

March 4 – It’s National Reading Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-way-with-wild-things-cover

About the Holiday

National Reading Month is a book-lover’s delight! Designed to encourage children and adults to read every day, the holiday gives you the perfect excuse to hurry out to your local bookstore or library to stock up! The month is only beginning, so gather the kids and discover some new books to enjoy together. Today’s new book is a natural to start with. And when you’ve finished reading, visit the Reading is Fundamental website to join the celebration by adding the books you read to the tally of the Million Book March.

A Way with Wild Things

Written by Larissa Theule | Illustrated by Sara Palacios

 

Poppy Ann Fields made friends with lots of bugs. She appreciated all of their natural talents—the way the cicadas formed a symphony, the way the ants marched in perfect lines, the way the shy roly poly said hello, and the “magnificent art” the spider wove. She could spend all day outside among these friends, “but when people came around, Poppy preferred to disappear into the background.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-way-with-wild-things-bugs

Image copyright Sara Palacios, 2020, text copyright Larissa Theule, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

At parties she dressed to blend in with the wallpaper or the brightly flowered rug. She could disappear into the framed landscape on the wall or behind the tree in the corner. To celebrate Grandma Phyllis’s 100th birthday, there was a big party. Poppy watched from behind the flowers and bushes. She watched as people strolled about, meeting and hugging, dancing and running. “They looked like colorful leaves falling into each other then drifting apart.”

A shimmering dragonfly drifted on the breeze and landed on the cake. “Her whole heart glad, Poppy clapped her hands.” She came over to look and that’s when Uncle Dan spotted her. His voice boomed, “‘Poppy Ann Fields, you wallflower, you. So that’s where you’ve been hiding this time.’” Everyone turned to look at Poppy. She froze. The dragonfly took off… “and landed in her hand.” No one could believe it; they smiled and stared in wonder. Then they moved in to get a closer look.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-way-with-wild-things-party

Image copyright Sara Palacios, 2020, text copyright Larissa Theule, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Poppy wished she could run away. She didn’t know where to look, so she gazed at the dragonfly. “She knew the dragonfly had come here for her.” She listened to the cicadas’ music wafting through the air and took a breath. Then she spoke, telling everyone the dragonfly’s scientific name. Grandma Phyllis clasped her hands and gave Poppy a hug. “‘You wildflower, you,’” she whispered. In her heart Poppy knew Grandma Phyllis was right. She was not a wallflower, but “a wildflower.”

An illustrated glossary of Poppy’s bug friends, along with their scientific name and a brief description follows the story.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-way-with-wild-things-birthday

Image copyright Sara Palacios, 2020, text copyright Larissa Theule, 2020. Courtesy of Bloomsbury Children’s Books.

Larissa Theule’s quietly comforting story is balm for those thoughtful, introverted children who interact with the world through observation, contemplation, and gentle interactions. With the soul of a poet, Poppy listens to, watches, and connects with nature, feeling its rhythms and wonder with her whole heart. Theule’s carefully chosen verbs and play on the idea of nature embrace Poppy’s personality. Poppy “preferred” to observe large, noisy gatherings from the sidelines while she “became” things that most people find lovely: landscapes, trees, rain, a group of animals.

When Uncle Dan’s loud voice turns everyone’s attention to Poppy, Theule’s simply stated “she was scared down to her toes” validates the feelings of kids who’d rather not be in the spotlight and gives children and adults an opportunity to talk about these emotions. The party-goers’ enthusiasm to hear what Poppy has to say and Grandma Phyllis’s loving and apt nickname for her granddaughter will reassure introverted readers that they are seen and appreciated for their unique strengths.

Sara Palacios festival of flowers—found outside, in Poppy’s home décor, and on party-goers’ clothing––surrounds Poppy and reveals that she is a part of and does fit in everywhere. One of the joys of A Way with Wild Things is finding Poppy on each page and appreciating Palacio’s creative genius in how she uses camouflage similar to nature. Her vivid, textured illustrations are joyous and full of love for nature, for life, and especially for Poppy who tenderly takes it all in and makes it uniquely hers.

Ages 3 – 6

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1681190396

Discover more about Larissa Theule and her books on her website.

To learn more about Sara Palacios, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Reading Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-reading-bug-book-plate

Catch the Reading Bug Bookmark, Bookplate, and Books-to-Read List

 

If National Reading Month is one of your favorite holidays, show it with these printable Reading Bug book accessories!

I’ve Got the Reading Bug Bookmark | I’ve Got the Reading Bug Bookplate | Books-to-Read List 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-way-with-wild-things-cover

You can find A Way with Wild Things at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

July 5 – Mechanical Pencil Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-cover

About the Holiday

The first pencil was created in Switzerland Inn 1565 Conrad Gesner created the first pencil when he wrapped a graphite stick in string. Later, the graphite would be encased in wood to make it easier to sharpen. Fast forward to 1822 when Sampson Mordan and John Isaac Hawkins of Britain patented the mechanical pencil that could advance the lead to keep it always sharp. Today, mechanical pencils work in one of three ways: ratchet-based, clutch-based, or screw-based. The various widths of lead now let writers, artists, designers, engineers, and others create to their specific needs. To celebrate today, why not explore how a mechanical pencil works with your child, and then have fun drawing or writing together! There’s even a printable page below to get you started!

 

Duck Gets a Job

By Sonny Ross

 

Duck needed a job. All of his friends talked about their super office jobs in the city and encouraged him to get one too. Duck scoured the want ads in the newspaper. There were lots of jobs in tech, finance, and business. He imagined himself working with spreadsheets like his friends did. The jobs “seemed boring, but he applied anyway. And he got an interview!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-friends

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

Duck agonized over what he’d wear. He tried on an outfit that made him look cool, one that was very professional, and one that was his natural, casual look. He decided to go with the professional style. Next, Duck thought about how he would get to the office. “Flying would make him tired and sweaty, but public transportation is tricky for ducks.” In the end he walked… and he got lost. Once in the city, he hailed a taxi, and while he rode to the interview “he gave himself a pep talk.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-taxi

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

Talking to the interviewer made Duck very nervous, but, still, he was offered a job. Sitting in his little cubicle with “spreadsheets full of facts and figures” in front of him, Duck realized that this job “did not interest him at all.” Duck decided to quit. Duck had always dreamed of being an artist, so he looked at job ads for the Creative Quack Magazine and found one he thought he’d like. “For his interview, he dressed in his natural look and put samples of his best work in a portfolio.”

He prepared for his trip into the city, and when he got to the office he didn’t feel at all nervous. He showed the art director his portfolio feeling confident about his work. The art director loved his work and offered him a job. Now Duck loves his job, and he’s especially glad “that he had decided to follow his dreams.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-creative-job

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

The strength of Sonny Ross’s affirming story comes in its straightforward approach to recognizing when an action is not right for you and feeling free to change course. While Duck is looking for the perfect job, the story is appropriate for any activity that children embark on as they find their place in the world. Ross peppers his story with clues that will alert readers to Duck’s true feelings about the two jobs—internal thoughts, clothing styles, and confidence level to name a few—feelings that they too can rely on to guide them in the choices they make.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-style

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

Ross’s matte mixed-media illustrations are fresh and stylish in a palette of blues, reds, and golds. Kids experimenting with their own look will appreciate Duck’s dilemma in choosing between cool, professional, and natural clothing styles. They’ll also empathize with his previous attempts at using public transportation and his travails in getting to the first interview on time. When Duck decides that a “spreadsheet job” isn’t for him, the page backgrounds lighten, his road to the interview is smooth, and his happiness is evident. A clever contrasting juxtaposition comes in the depictions of Duck’s two very different interviews. While the businessman sits at his desk peering down on tiny Duck who can barely see over the desk and is nearly swallowed up in his chair, the art director kneels down to Duck’s level to shake his wing in congratulations on getting the job.

Both an entertaining story and a lesson for kids on trusting their gut and staying true to themselves, Duck Gets a Job is a confidence-boosting tale for any home or classroom bookshelf.

Ages 3 – 7

Templar Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-0763698966

Discover more about Sonny Ross, his books, and his art on his website.

Mechanical Pencil Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-mechanical-pencil-page

Click…Click…Create! Page

 

Grab your mechanical pencil and get clicking or twisting! Then create a design, a picture, a poem, a story, or whatever you imagine on this printable page!

Click…Click…Create! Page

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-cover

Duck Gets a Job is available at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

December 17 – It’s National Write a Business Plan Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-cover

About the Holiday

Do you own a business or have dreams of opening your own shop or service company? An important step toward success is to write a clear business plan, and that’s what this month is all about! Established to help businesses plan efficiently, stay organized, and run smoothly whether they’re big or small, today’s holiday can inspire you to reach for and achieve the work life you’ve always wanted. Even job seekers benefit from writing a business plan of sorts to clarify what they’re looking for in the perfect job.

Duck Gets a Job

By Sonny Ross

 

Duck needed a job. All of his friends talked about their super office jobs in the city and encouraged him to get one too. Duck scoured the want ads in the newspaper. There were lots of jobs in tech, finance, and business. He imagined himself working with spreadsheets like his friends did. The jobs “seemed boring, but he applied anyway. And he got an interview!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-friends

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

Duck agonized over what he’d wear. He tried on an outfit that made him look cool, one that was very professional, and one that was his natural, casual look. He decided to go with the professional style. Next, Duck thought about how he would get to the office. “Flying would make him tired and sweaty, but public transportation is tricky for ducks.” In the end he walked… and he got lost. Once in the city, he hailed a taxi, and while he rode to the interview “he gave himself a pep talk.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-taxi

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

Talking to the interviewer made Duck very nervous, but, still, he was offered a job. Sitting in his little cubicle with “spreadsheets full of facts and figures” in front of him, Duck realized that this job “did not interest him at all.” Duck decided to quit. Duck had always dreamed of being an artist, so he looked at job ads for the Creative Quack Magazine and found one he thought he’d like. “For his interview, he dressed in his natural look and put samples of his best work in a portfolio.”

He prepared for his trip into the city, and when he got to the office he didn’t feel at all nervous. He showed the art director his portfolio feeling confident about his work. The art director loved his work and offered him a job. Now Duck loves his job, and he’s especially glad “that he had decided to follow his dreams.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-creative-job

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

The strength of Sonny Ross’s affirming story comes in its straightforward approach to recognizing when an action is not right for you and feeling free to change course. While Duck is looking for the perfect job, the story is appropriate for any activity that children embark on as they find their place in the world. Ross peppers his story with clues that will alert readers to Duck’s true feelings about the two jobs—internal thoughts, clothing styles, and confidence level to name a few—feelings that they too can rely on to guide them in the choices they make.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-style

Copyright Sonny Ross, 2018, courtesy of Templar Books.

Ross’s matte mixed-media illustrations are fresh and stylish in a palette of blues, reds, and golds. Kids experimenting with their own look will appreciate Duck’s dilemma in choosing between cool, professional, and natural clothing styles. They’ll also empathize with his previous attempts at using public transportation and his travails in getting to the first interview on time. When Duck decides that a “spreadsheet job” isn’t for him, the page backgrounds lighten, his road to the interview is smooth, and his happiness is evident. A clever contrasting juxtaposition comes in the depictions of Duck’s two very different interviews. While the businessman sits at his desk peering down on tiny Duck who can barely see over the desk and is nearly swallowed up in his chair, the art director kneels down to Duck’s level to shake his wing in congratulations on getting the job.

Both an entertaining story and a lesson for kids on trusting their gut and staying true to themselves, Duck Gets a Job is a confidence-boosting tale for any home or classroom bookshelf.

Ages 3 – 7

Templar Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-0763698966

Discover more about Sonny Ross, his books, and his art on his website.

National Write a Business Plan Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-dream-job-application

Dream Job Application

 

Before you can know your customers, you need to know yourself and find your perfect job. Here’s a printable Dream Job Application to get you thinking about what job you’d like to have!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-duck-gets-a-job-cover

Duck Gets a Job is available at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review