October 28 – It’s Black Cat Awareness Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-cover

About the Holiday

There may be many pet holidays—and even cat holidays—but this month we celebrate one particular feline: the black cat. While black cats are just as cuddly and sweet as any other cat, the superstition that black cats bring bad luck make them the least adopted of all cats.  If you’re considering adopting a cat or kitten, think about giving a black cat a forever home.

The Scariest Book Ever

By Bob Shea

 

On the very first page a little ghost lets kids know just what kind of book they’re holding—a scary one! It’s so scary that even before the first page—back on the title page—there were “dark woods” that are “probably crawling with hungry monsters with smelly breath, sharp fangs, and pointy claws.” At least the ghost hopes so. He also hopes he doesn’t spill his orange juice on himself, but you know how that goes—once you think about something, it happens.

Now the ghost is soaking wet and naked as a window. He can’t go into the forest like that! He sends you off into the woods alone and promises to meet you “in a couple of pages.” You see that the woods are full of pointy trees, whose shadows all create arrows pointing to one particular spot. “Well?” the ghost asks, “What do you see? A dark hole?” The ghost’s wide, owl-like eyes glow from the darkness, and he warns readers that “nothing ever good comes out of a dark hole!” He reassures them that they can stay here and help “with the haunted housework” which includes cleaning the bathroom. “That’s scary, right?”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-forest

Copyright Bob Shea, 2017, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

But you go back, and what’s this? Out of the hole pops the cutest little bunny you ever did see! Her cheeks are pink and she’s wearing an adorable coat. A smiling snail, ladybug, and worm have also come to say hello. Back to the ghost who’s now up to his elbows in is rubber gloves (ghosts have elbows, right?). He wants to know all about the scary thing that came out of the hole. He’s even got some guesses: “Snakes made out of bees? A spider in a crabby mood? Broccoli?”

The ghost thinks the whole story of a sweet bunny is some kind of trick to get him into those frightening woods. But he’s happily scared right where he is, thank you very much. Can’t you see the ferocious black kitten lapping up milk with her little pink tongue? But you are pretty brave. Look at you–you just went back into the forest, where the bunny is giving out invitations to a Spooky Party to all of her friends.

The ghost wants to know what you saw…no he doesn’t…yes he does…no he doesn’t! Ok, so when he hears it, he doesn’t believe it. “Whimsical woodland creatures? Invitations? To a party? Nice try. What’s next, pumpkin picking in a pumpkin patch?” But as you’re leaving again, the ghost realizes his skepticism is a bit off-putting, so he tries to lure you back with doughnuts—“Spooooooooky doughnuts.” Meanwhile, the bunny is leading a parade through the forest, where the trees seem to be getting smaller and smaller. Sure enough the “whimsical woodland animals” have been visiting a pumpkin patch and these smiling little gourds are coming along to the party too.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-owl-eyes

Copyright Bob Shea, 2017, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

“OOOOOOOHHHHH….” No, the ghost isn’t trying to be scary; his belly just aches from all the doughnuts he ate. See them? If you think the story about the pumpkin patch is going to rouse the ghost, you’re sadly mistaken. The ghost thinks it’s just a tall tale and does a bit of scolding: “Gimme a break. You think I died yesterday? I’m not falling for that. I’m staying right here.” And while he’s at it, he’s upset that the kitten has been so frightened that all she can do is pounce and play with a soft pink ball of yarn.

But you know how readers are—always turning the page! So here we are, and everyone is doing crafts and eating treats. The ghost figures since he “didn’t hear any screaming” and there were just crafts and cupcakes that the “woods aren’t that scary after all.” He decides to drop in—but just to “save you from the cupcakes.” He means “the super scary monsters.” But what’s this?! Horrible monsters like bats and Frankenstein and bandits and jack o-lanterns. There’s even another ghost. “AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!”

The ghost zips away, giving you a very stern tongue lashing, “Why didn’t you warn me? Are you trying to scare me more to death?” But the kitty sets him straight about the whole costume party thing, so he goes back—kitty first though. And when he gets back, everyone’s taken off their costume, and the ghost can see who’s underneath. “Oh, ha, ha, ha! Very funny,” he chuckles. No one loves a costume party more than a naked ghost.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-party

Copyright Bob Shea, 2017, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

Bob Shea has written one scary funny book for little readers, who will guffaw at the juxtaposition of frightening and cute and the ghost’s examples of some pretty scary stuff. Shea’s chatty ghost who sends readers into the woods and then wheedles, scoffs, and chides them afterward is an adorably sympathetic spirit—one that kids will take to heart from the first page.

Shea’s unique style and humor as well as one very cool printing trick that allows for a “naked ghost” to appear on the page will make readers Oooo and Ahhhh—in a good way. Black- and blue-toned pages alternate with candlelight-yellow ones to mirror the little ghost’s deep, dark fears and the festive reality of the bunny’s party. The final reveal not only puts the ghost at ease but also any readers who may feel a bit of trepidation about Halloween or the unseen in general.

The Scariest Book Ever is not just for Halloween as readers will love the garrulous ghost and the giggly, gentle nudge to try something new any time of the year. The book makes for fun and dramatic read-aloud story times at home, in classrooms, and at the library.

Ages 4 – 7

Disney-Hyperion, 2017 | ISBN 978-1484730461

This could be the scariest The Scariest Book Ever book trailer!

Black Cat Awareness Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cat-and-pumpkin-coloring-page

Cats and Pumpkin Coloring Page

 

Halloween may be scary, but these two kittens and happy pumpkin are sweet! Give yourself a treat and enjoy this printable Cats and Pumpkin Coloring Page.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-cover

You can find The Scariest Book Ever at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

YYPicture Book Review

October 17 – Get Ready for Halloween

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sammy's-spooktacular-halloween-cover

About the Holiday

Halloween is almost here! Enjoy the thrills and chills all month long with fun Halloween-themed books like this one. Yu may even want to keep them on the shelf to celebrate all YEAR long – just like the boy in today’s book! 

Sammy’s Spooktacular Halloween

By Mike Petrik

 

On Halloween night all the kids looked forward to visiting the Loomis’s barn, where “the biggest, creepiest, jump-scariest haunted house in the neighborhood” took place. Everyone in the family helped out as witches, spirits, and vampires and in making lots of thunder, fog, and eerie sounds. Sammy, especially, wanted to make “sure to give the trick-or-treaters a fang-tastically fun time.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sammy's-spooktacular-halloween-candy

Copyright Mike Petrik, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

On the morning after Halloween, the whole family gathered for pumpkin pancakes to relive the thrill of the night before. This year, Sammy could hardly concentrate on his pancakes because he already had so many ideas for the haunted house next year. Sammy’s older siblings, Luke and Molly, thought Sammy was too young to think of cool ideas, but his dad told Sammy to “give it a whirl.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sammy's-spooktacular-halloween-too-little

Copyright Mike Petrik, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

After a couple of weeks, Sammy began testing his ideas on the family. There were a few missteps – especially the jack-o’-lantern turkey and spiders and bats décor at Thanksgiving. And a Zombie Christmas really wasn’t what the rest of the family had in mind. As the winter wore on, Sammy perfected his scares. Molly’s sleepover was bone-chilling when Sammy made a skeleton skateboard through the living room.

Instead of a marshmallow egg Easter, Sammy conjured up a Happy Hallow-Easter egg hunt. But when the family’s Fourth of July barbecue was “rained out” by the sprinkler hiding in the tree, Sammy’s dad put his foot down. “‘Your ideas are wonderfully creepy,’ said Dad, ‘but Halloween has taken over everything.” He put the kibosh on all further haunting until everyone was onboard.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sammy's-spooktacular-halloween-haunted-house

Copyright Mike Petrik, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Sammy was feeling pretty down until Molly and Luke told him they thought his tricks were real treats and offered to help him create more. Under Sammy’s direction, they came up with amazing new hauntings. When the barn was finally decorated,  “Mom and Dad were spellbound.” Dad said, “‘We admire how you’ve stuck with it all year long,’” and Mom added, “‘So we’re naming you Halloween Spirit this year.’”

On Halloween night, Sammy welcomed all the neighbors with a spooky “‘HAPPY HALLOWEEN!’” and a “‘beware what lurks in the dark. Muah ha ha!’” The trick-or-treaters were shivering as they passed a skateboarding skeleton, an electrified Frankenstein, roiling fog, bubbling cauldrons, and bats, spiders, and ghosts galore. For Sammy, it was the best Halloween ever—and he was already planning for next year.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sammy's-spooktacular-halloween-haunted-barn

Copyright Mike Petrik, 2018, courtesy of Two Lions.

Young Halloween lovers—i.e. all kids—will find Sammy’s Spooktacular Halloween frightfully funny and, no doubt, inspirational too. From the list of Sammy’s haunted house elements titled “Scares! Spooks!” on the front cover to the experimental tricks to the other holiday mash-ups, Sammy’s imaginative ideas will enthrall kids. Engineers-in-the-making will eagerly await each page turn as they mull over the possible ways to recreate Sammy’s devices. While Sammy learns that a bit of moderation in his year-long quest for the best Halloween ever may be in order, Mike Petrik’s inclusion of helpful siblings and supportive parents is heartening and will please readers—especially youngest family members.

Petrik’s pages are electrified with bold, vibrant colors and Sammy’s thrilling Halloween haunts that move, shiver, and shake. A house full of fog, ghosts that rappel into Dad’s cereal, a turkey carved like a jack-o’-lantern, and a crew of zombie snowmen are just some of the delights awaiting readers. Images of Luke and Molly assisting Sammy and Mom and Dad’s happy faces as they reward Sammy for his hard work will bring a smile. The final two-page spread of the family’s haunted barn is a showstopper that kids will want to explore.

A terrific book to inspire Halloween fun and sibling harmony, Sammy’s Spooktacular Halloween would be a super (natural) selection for home and school libraries.

Ages 3 – 7

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503901797

To learn more about Mike Petrik, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Read a New Book Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spookiy-graveyard-craft

Spooky Haunted Graveyard

 

With a few items found in a backyard or park and a few from home, kids can make a spooky haunted graveyard to decorate their room or add to the family’s Halloween décor.

Supplies

  • Ten to twelve small to medium stones that have a triangular or rounded shape and can stand on their own (or close enough to be glued down)
  • Shallow cardboard box or plastic container
  • Small sticks or branches for the tree
  • A small amount of dirt, small dry leaves, moss, etc.
  • Poly fill for the fog (optional)
  • White craft paint
  • Small bit of clay
  • Paint brush
  • Black marker
  • Hot glue gun or strong glue

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-haunted-graveyard-craft

Directions

To Make the Ghosts

  1. Paint 5 or 6 stones with the white paint, let dry
  2. Add eyes and mouth with the black marker

To Make the Tombstones

  1. Add RIP, names, and dates to 5 or 6 stones with the black marker

To Make the Tree

  1. Use one or two small branches or twigs to make the tree
  2. Stick them into the clay for stability

To Make the Graveyard

  1. Draw a fence inside and outside on the rim of the box (optional)
  2. Scatter the tombstones around the box and glue in place
  3. Scatter the ghosts near the tombstones and around the graveyard, and glue them in place
  4. Stick the small branches or twigs in the clay

To Make the Ground

  1. Scatter dirt, leaves, moss, around the tombstones and ghosts
  2. Add wispy bits of poly fill around the ghosts and tombstones and in the tree (optional)

Display your haunted graveyard!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sammy's-spooktacular-halloween-cover

You can find Sammy’s Spooktacular Halloween at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

October 4 – Kids Music Day and Interview with Carole Gerber

celebrate-pciture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-cover

About the Holiday

Kids Music Day was established in 2016 by Keep Music Alive to raise awareness of the importance of music education for children. The day includes events like student performances, opportunities for kids to see and try a wide range of instruments, instrument donation drives and more. On the first Kids Music Day, 80 music schools in 24 US states took part. In 2017 that number jumped to over 400 participants in more than 40 states and Canada. Last year 600 music schools and retail shops in 10 countries participated with free music lessons and other activities. Keep Music Alive is a nonprofit whose mission is to demonstrate the importance of music in everyone’s life from listening for pleasure to participating as an instrumentalist or composer to partaking in music therapy and more. To learn more, visit keepmusicalive.org and kidsmusicday.org

I received a copy of If You’re Scary and You Know It! from Familius for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Familius in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

If You’re Scary and You Know It!

Written by Carole Gerber | Illustrated by Noël Ill

 

Your kids have it, right? That giddy energy as they prepare for the big night of chills and thrills and decide on the most pressing question: What will I be? Carole Gerber and Noël Ill know exactly how that feels, and their book, a rollicking adaptation of the participatory favorite “If You’re Happy and You Know It” will keep readers moving and giggling all month long—and beyond.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-witchy

Image copyright Noël Ill, 2019, text copyright Carole Gerber, 2019. Courtesy of Familius.

Perfectly suited for singing or reading, If You’re Scary and You Know It! Introduces eight adorably creepy characters for kids to play and play with. Kids under the Halloween spell may be feeling a bit witchy these days. If that’s true, there’s only one thing to do: “If you’re witchy and you know it, mix a brew. / Throw some frog legs in your potion—icky poo! / Cackle as the cauldron bubbles. / Add a taste of trolls and troubles. / If you’re witchy and you know it, mix a brew.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-werewolf

Image copyright Noël Ill, 2019. Courtesy of Familius.

Kids got a taste for spooky tricks instead? Then they’ll love to “…moan and groan. Float around and haunt the people in your home.” Especially any younger siblings! Now that the fun is truly out of the bag, kids can brandish their pirate sword, flash a fiendish vampire smile, howl at the full moon, shoo crows away from the pumpkin patch, and perform other bits of mischief.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-scare-crow

Image copyright Noël Ill, 2019, text copyright Carole Gerber, 2019. Courtesy of Familius.

By this time their teeth may be chattering and their bones rattling. Well then, “If you’re bony and you know it, touch your toes. / You can bend and twist to strike a funny pose. / Spread your arms and bend your knees— / move in any way you please! / If you’re bony and you know it, touch your toes.” Finally, that most anticipated day arrives! What now? You know! It’s time to “meet up with your friends out in the street. / Walk together door-to-door, to get candy and lots more! If you’re scary and you know it—Trick or Treat!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-scare-trick-or-treatcelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-scare-trick-or-treat

Image copyright Noël Ill, 2019, text copyright Carole Gerber, 2019. Courtesy of Familius.

Kids and adults alike will fully get into the spirit of Halloween with Carole Gerber’s clever and enticingly impish rhymes that will have them moving their feet, yowling ghoulishly, and laughing together. Gerber’s rich language and detailed action-packed storytelling are a joy to sing or read aloud and give kids plenty to imitate as they listen. Children will love joining in on the repeated phrases, and older kids will learn the jaunty verses in no time.

In her delightful, spritely illustrations, Noël Ill replicates the eerie autumn atmosphere that adds to the thrill of Halloween while also clearly depicting motions that children can perform with each verse. Ill’s diverse kids float, dance, growl, screech, and shake with the same enthusiasm as little readers. The final two-page spreads invite children to that nighttime world of magic and treats.

A must inclusion in any Halloween collection, If You’re Scary and You Know It! is a book you’ll want to keep out year-round for energetic, active story times. It is a perfect book to share with groups and as an activity at Halloween parties. Published in a board book format, this book will also appeal to older children.

Ages 3 – 6

Familius, 2019 | ISBN 978-1641701464

Discover more about Carole Gerber and her books on her website.

To learn more about Noël Ill, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Carole Gerber

IMG_1919-001(3)

Poet and author Carole Gerber has written sixteen picture books, three chapter books, and more than one hundred elementary science and reading texts for major publishers. Her picture book, A Band of Babies, was named a 2017 Best Book for Children by Amazon editors. She holds a BS in English education and an MA in journalism from Ohio State, and has taught middle school and high school English as well as college newswriting and factual writing at OSU.

I’m thrilled to be chatting with Carole Gerber today about how adults can have fun with her new book, how she gets everyone participating at school visits, and a favorite part of her writing routine.

The rhythm of If You’re Scary and You Know It comes from a favorite child’s interactive song, but your clever verses go well beyond the simple repetition of the original. What inspired you to adapt this song for Halloween? I love the examples of scary that you chose and your other fun, evocative words. How did you choose your scary adjectives and develop each verse?

It’s much easier to write a story or song based on an existing one, because the structure is already there. Most kids and adults know the tune “If You’re Happy and You Know It,” so I decided to use it as a template. I then looked on Amazon to see what similar Halloween books were already on the market. If there were dozens, I would not have written mine. Luckily, I saw only one. It was titled If You’re Spooky and You Know It. I love the word “spooky” and had at first thought to use that word in my title. However, I did not want my book to compete with a title already published. I wanted a story/song that kids could act out, so I chose eight characters and thought up different silly but logical actions for each. For example, the pirate shouts “Yo ho!” and waves his sword, the witch “cackles” as she mixes her brew, the black cat arches her back and spreads her claws, and so on.

If You’re Scary and You Know It lends itself to singing and acting out as well as reading. Do you have any advice for adults on sharing this book with kids and “playing” with it?

Get into it along with the kids! Be playful and happy and sing your heart out. Kids love it when adults act silly. It’s fun to cackle like a witch, shout like a pirate, and shout “Meeeoow” as you spread your “claws.” Plus, the funny-sounding descriptors like “vampy,” “fiendish” and “hairy” are fun for everyone to sing. And, without realizing it, kids will learn some interesting vocabulary.

Noël Ill’s enchanting illustrations are adorably kid-centric. They also really invite kids to join in on the fun. Did you get to collaborate on the illustrations? I know it must be hard to choose a favorite illustration—but do you have one?

The publisher’s art director let me choose among the work of three artists he thought would do a good job. All were talented, but Noël’s illustrations were so sweet, bright, and clever that I knew she would come up with pictures that perfectly complemented my words. And she did! As is customary, I got to see sketches before she did final illustrations, and my input was honored. The first thing she illustrated was the cover – and I was thrilled! When all illustrations were complete, I learned from her short online video that the illustration of the black cat is based on her own childhood Halloween costume. After seeing the resemblance, the black cat became my favorite illustration! You can see it here: https://youtu.be/NPsn7syYvJo

You sponsor children around the world through World Vision. Does this experience influence your writing in any way?

Some of the money I earn as a writer helps children in less fortunate parts of the world get fed and educated. I became a World Vision sponsor 34 years ago when my daughter Jess was born and began adding more children as she grew up. I became a sponsor for another Christian relief organization, Feed My Starving Children, 20+ years ago when I learned about their amazing organization while researching an article for a magazine. Contributing regularly to these charities for children is one small way I can consistently thank God for giving me the opportunities I’ve had as a writer and also the great good fortune to be born in the United States. 

In addition to your fiction for children, you’ve authored a long list of school reading and science texts for all grade levels and about a wide range of topics. How did you get started writing for this market? What kind of research goes into each book? Do you have a favorite and why?

 I got into the education market as a result of writing textbook ad copy for McGraw-Hill. The product manager put me in touch with some editors. Each book I wrote had to be written at a specific reading level, and often I was required to use certain vocabulary words. Many of them required extensive research, which I mostly did online using reputable sources. One of my favorites was Once There Were Two: The Negro Baseball League. It was enlightening to learn about how African-Americans were forced to play in a separate league and had to stay in “colored” hotels. The most challenging were the books I wrote as part of a series called “Retold Classics.” I had to summarize and rewrite very simply The Iliad and other stories based on an oral tradition. Eeek! It was challenging to boil these lengthy tales down to their “bones.”

Your school visits sound amazing – especially the “poetry jams” and creating a class poem collaboratively with students. Can you talk about what you love about visiting schools? Do you have an anecdote from one you’d like to share?

After showing a funny slide show of my “creative process,” I let kids use the microphone (which they love) to do the talking. They read from my book Seeds, Bees, Butterflies and More: Poems for Two Voices. I also wrote funny, tricky riddle poems specifically for school visits that kids read in pairs. The poems give clues about common objects (i.e., pencil, basketball). The first student in the audience to guess the correct answer chooses a partner and they read the next poem. To guess correctly, students must LISTEN! 😊. At the end, those who haven’t yet participated read from my poem for 13 voices titled “Cats!” Kids who are shy or not good readers get their chance to shine. As a lesson extension, the teacher is given a format for collaboratively writing a class poem if she or he chooses.

Do you have a special place you like to write or routine while writing?

I prefer to write on my desktop computer, which is in my home office. I have a laptop I can use if I am away, but I prefer the keyboard on my desktop. My routine requires me to drive to Starbucks to buy a chai latte before I seriously spend any time writing. I periodically attempt to stop this addiction. I did quit once for a few months but went back to buying one as an occasional treat and soon was back my costly morning habit. Sigh.         

What’s up next for you?

I have another holiday book out this year: The Gifts of the Animals, A Christmas Tale. It is loosely based on an old Latin hymn and tells in verse about gifts the stable animals gave to prepare the manger. It is beautifully illustrated by Yumi Shimokawara, who lives in Japan and speaks very little English. There’s an interesting story about how she was chosen. I’d love to share it with your readers if you invite me back.

What’s your favorite holiday and why?

Clearly, I love both Halloween and Christmas! I have had two Halloween books published and three Christmas books. I grew up in a small town in a simpler time. My mother helped us make our Halloween costumes and my sister and I went trick-or-treating with our neighborhood friends. Everyone’s parents stayed home to hand out treats. At Christmas, we participated in church children’s productions.

Do you have an anecdote from any holiday (or holiday-themed book) that you’d like to share?

I admit to soaping a few windows of people who turned out their lights and did not answer their doors on Halloween. This was one of the “tricks” played on those did not “treat.” Once for the church Christmas play, my sister and I got to play the parts of shepherds. We wore our chenille bathrobes as costumes and got to sing a Christmas song with nine parts in which each letter of “Christmas” had a line. I don’t recall her letter, but mine was “A’s for all he stands for.”

Thanks so much, Carole! It’s been wonderful learning about your work and about your love of chai lattes—they’re my favorite too!  I can’t wait to talk to you again soon about your upcoming Christmas book The Gifts of the Animals, A Christmas Tale!

Kids Music Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-rock-pumpkin-craft

Rock Jack-O-Lantern

 

With carefully chosen rocks you can create one jack-o’-lantern or a whole pumpkin patch!

Supplies

  • Round, smooth rock ( or rocks in a variety of sizes)
  • Orange craft paint, and other colors for a multi-hued pumpkin patch
  • Black permanent marker or black craft paint
  • Short sturdy twig (one for each rock)
  • Hot glue gun or strong glue
  • Paintbrush

Directions

  1. Clean and dry the rock
  2. Paint the rock, let dry
  3. Draw or paint a jack-o’-lantern face on the rock, let dry
  4. Glue the short twig to the top  of the rock pumpkin

celebrate-pciture-books-picture-book-review-if-you're-scary-and-you-know-it-coverPicture Book Review

You can find If You’re Scary and You Know It! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

September 28 – National Ghost Hunting Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-cover

About the Holiday

On the last Saturday in September, The ScareFest in Lexington, Kentucky kicks off a coast-to-coast simultaneous ghost hunt by teams investigating paranormal phenomenon in various venues. They collecting supporting evidence with EMF meters, digital thermometers, handheld and static digital video cameras, audio recorders and computers. The hunt ushers in a month of mysteries, haunted attractions, and other autumn festivals.

How to Make Friends with a Ghost

By Rebecca Green

 

Have you ever thought of ghosts and felt a shiver? Ever been glad you don’t know any ghosts? Well, the little girl narrating this ghostly guide says you should dispel those notions. Ghosts, she assures, “are sweet creatures who need friends too. And who better to befriend them than you?” She even goes on to show potential ghost pals everything they need to know.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-on-log

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of Tundra Books.

First, you must learn to recognize a ghost when you see one. There are many false sightings, like kids in costumes, impressions made by a “dusty camera lens,” and “a towel on a doorknob.” But the leading expert on such matters, Dr. Phantoneous Spookel reveals that instead of searching for ghosts, it’s best to let them find you. To help you recognize them, the little girl provides an easy-to-follow classification guide that can help.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-false-sightings

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of Tundra Books.

If you’ve been approached by a figure that has rosy cheeks, arms but no fingers, a glowing body, and a “wavy bottom for mobility,” you can be pretty sure you’ve seen a ghost. Here are some dos and don’ts for how to proceed. Your first instinct may be to flee, but “do not run! Ghosts are very sensitive creatures.” Just be friendly and “tell the ghost your name.” Invite the ghost into your home, but “never ever put you hand through a ghost. It can cause a serious tummy ache.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-classification-guide

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Ghosts require special care and enjoy snacks like “moldy toast, earwax truffles, pickled boogers, mud tarts, and cinnamon-dusted insects.” For a main course, “Floating Spaghetti and Mudballs hits the spot. Wonder how to keep your ghost friend happily occupied? A walk through the woods in search of “leaves, acorns, and worms” is always nice. Ghosts also love scary stories like the ones found in “Tales of the Living by Mort L. Bings.” And they like to laugh at funny jokes and dance to “creepy music.” Of course, a ghost friend fits right in on Halloween.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-dancing

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of myblankpaper.com.

When a ghost gets tired, it’s a perfect time for a long soak in a warm caldron bath. Then off to the dankest corner of the attic for a little snooze and sweet nightmares on some soft moss. If your ghost has trouble falling to sleep, you can sing a lullaby of “eerie hums and wails.” Sometimes your ghost might like to hide when you have company, Good spots include the “tissue box…a sock drawer…or the refrigerator” next to the milk.

Even though ghosts are quick, their soft, white shapelessness can get them into trouble. “Do not let your ghost be used as a tissue!” Getting mixed up with the laundry can cause problems of the soggy or fluffy kind, and ghost should be especially careful in the kitchen, where they can be mistaken for “eggs, whipped cream, sour cream, and marshmallows.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-tissue-box

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Perhaps the best part about having a ghost as a friend is that they will be your buddy for life—and even beyond. As you grow up there are certain things you can do to maintain your friendship. When you leave home and find your own place, make sure it’s comfortable and isn’t haunted. “Ghosts do not like competition.” Make time every day to spend with your ghost, and if you start a family, you should know that “your ghost will love mini versions of you too.” When you grow old, your ghost will still be there to help out and make life better. Yes, “the best part about making friends with a ghost is that you’ll have the sweetest friend…forever.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-say-hi

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of myblankpaper.com.

Rebecca Green’s spirited tribute to true friendship is sweet and funny and applicable to all pals—ghostly or not. Who wouldn’t like the kind of friendship that lasts forever? Through her ghostly guide, Green reveals that a new friend may be of an unexpected sort and might even be someone who has been invisible to you. Her tips show that embracing a new friend is as easy as saying hi and making them feel important with special treatment, understanding, and sharing favorite activities. Friendships can suffer when two people grow up and grow apart because of distance, work, or family, but Green suggests that with careful attention, a friendship can last forever.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-snacks

Copyright Rebecca Green, 2017, courtesy of myblankpaper.com.

Green’s adorable gouache and colored-pencil illustrations have a timeless feel rendered in soft beiges and grays punctuated with red accents. Green’s clever text is enhanced by images of the false ghost sightings, classification guide, ghost snacks, hiding places and hazards, and the expressive little ghost as it laughs, plays, sleeps, and smiles. As the girl grows older, the ghost takes the lead in activities the two enjoy, leaving readers with a satisfying and comforting feeling.

Readers will giggle and “aww” and fall in love with the little ghost and the idea of such a wonderful friendship. How to Make Friends with a Ghost is rich in charm and sage advice and would make a welcome presence on any child’s or classroom bookshelf.

Ages 4 – 8

Tundra Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1101919019

Learn more about Rebecca Green and find a gallery of her illustration work on her website.

Don’t be frightened! It’s just the adorable How to Make Friends with a Ghost book trailer!

National Ghost Hunting Day Activity

 celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-ghost-coloring-page

Cute Ghost Coloring Page

 

If all ghosts were this adorable, who would be afraid of them? Color this printable Cute Ghost Coloring Page then let it hang around your room.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-make-friends-with-a-ghost-cover

You can find How to Make Friends with a Ghost at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

October 22 – National Color Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shivery-shades-of-halloween-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s holiday has a pretty simple goal—to encourage people to appreciate all the colors that make up our world and to use color to express their feelings, their personality, and their creativity. The stunning beauty of changing leaves makes fall the perfect time for celebrating color, and October is usually when this gorgeous natural phenomenon is at its peak. To have fun with today’s holiday, experiment with color—you may see the world in a whole new way!

Shivery Shades of Halloween: A Spooky Book of Colors

Written by Mary McKenna Siddals | Illustrated by Jimmy Pickering

 

Have you ever thought, “What color is Halloween?” Sure, we all know it’s orange and black—but what about the rest of the color wheel? Tell me—what’s your favorite color? Purple? Let me look through Shivery Shades of Halloween…Yes! Halloween is purple—“Twilight, / Shadows, / Monsters lurking, / Secret potion— / Poof! It’s working! Dusky-musky, bruisy-oozy, cruelish-ghoulish / Blotch of purple.”

Hey! This is fun! Give me another one! Gray, you say? Hang on…. Yes! Halloween is Gray! “Tombstone, gargoyle, / Dungeon wall, / Rats and rubble, / Haunted hall, / Dusty-fusty, dimly-grimly, shady-fraidy / Shroud of gray.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shivery-shades-of-halloween-blue

Image copyright Jimmy Pickering, 2014, text copyright Mary McKenna Siddals, 2014. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Okay, now it’s my turn. I’m choosing…Red. Yep! Halloween is also Red: “Tip of fang, / Flash of cape, / Horns and tail, / A gash, a gape, Bloody-ruddy, burning-churning, blushing-gushing / Stain of red.”

Wild! And that’s just the beginning! There are also spirited, spooky rhymes about brown, yellow, blue, white, green, and, of course, orange and black.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shivery-shades-of-halloween-black

Image copyright Jimmy Pickering, 2014, text copyright Mary McKenna Siddals, 2014. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Mary McKenna Siddals brings joy and a love of words—their sounds and their effects—to her verses that transport kids to the throbbing heart of Halloween on the broomsticks of color. In Shivery Shades of Halloween, Siddals presents all the spine-tingling  places, characters, and objects that make this holiday, and any mystery, so much chilling, thrilling fun. With giggles, ewwws, and a few shivers, kids will delight in the original and imaginative phrasing in this clever concept book.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-shivery-shades-of-halloween-white

Image copyright Jimmy Pickering, 2014, text copyright Mary McKenna Siddals, 2014. Courtesy of Random House Books for Young Readers.

Jimmy Pickering’s vibrant, full-bleed illustrations ooze, flash, and swirl with the colors of Halloween. For Green, a “queasy-peasy” web-eared reptile slurps a “vile brew” from a test tube as an evil scientist looks on and the walls seep with a thick green sludge. Purple zaps and sparks as the reptile is transformed into a smiling goblin with bats’ wings and five legs. This goblin then leads readers from page to page where they meet a tricky ghost, a haunted graveyard, a spell-casting wizard and crystal-ball-reading witch, a floating candlestick in a haunted house, a howling werewolf, a dancing caldron, a clumsy demon, and a trio of trick-or-treaters. Each painting incorporates touches of the other colors introduced, creating eye-catching and suspense-building pages.

Shivery Shades of Halloween is a book that kids will want to hear and you will want to read over and over. For teachers, the book makes a wonderful resource for writing lessons and to show the power of evocative words not only around Halloween, but at any time of the year. Shivery Shades of Halloween is one concept book that transcends its holiday theme and would be a welcome addition to home bookshelves as well as school, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 2 – 7

Random House Books for Young Readers, 2014 | ISBN 978-0385369992

Take a peek at Victoria scaring up some fun by reading Shivery Shades of Halloween!

To learn more about Mary McKenna Siddals and her other books, visit her website! You’ll also find lots of activities as well as activity sheets to extend your enjoyment of Shivery Shades of Halloween: A Spooky Book of Colors as well as her other books.

Here’s a link to Shivery Shades of Halloween Activity Sheets.

You can also connect with Mary McKenna Siddals on her Shivery Shades of Halloween Facebook Page, where you’ll find more fun and a whole community of readers.

Discover more about Jimmy Pickering and view a gallery of his illustrations, paintings, sculpture and more on his website. 

Halloween Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-halloween-mobile

Halloween Hang-ups

 

With glue, glitter, and your imagination you can make your love of Halloween and its ghosts, ghouls, pumpkins, and more colorfully transparent to all!

Supplies

  • Printable Halloween figure templates | Template 1 | Template 2
  • Poster board or other heavy stock paper or cardboard
  • White glue
  • Glitter in a variety of colors
  • Googly eyes (optional)
  • Scissors
  • Wax paper
  • Popsicle or craft sticks
  • Needle
  • White thread (or any color)
  • Fine-tip permanent marker
  • Hot glue gun or regular glue

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-halloween-mobile-craft

Directions

  1. Print the Halloween Figures templates
  2. Cut out the figures
  3. Trace the figures onto the poster board
  4. Cut out the figures around the outside edge and also along the inside edge
  5. Lay out the figure templates on the wax paper
  6. Gently pour some white glue into the center of the figure template
  7. Smooth the glue completely to the edges of the figure template, adding glue if needed
  8. Sprinkle glitter on the glue, as much or as little as you’d like

To dry the glue

  1. Let the figures sit overnight OR:
  2. Place the figures on the wax paper in a warm oven. Turn the oven on to 200 – 250 degrees and let it come up to heat. Then turn the oven off and place the figures inside. Check after 15 minutes and check frequently until dry.

After the glue is dry

  1. Add faces to the ghosts with a permanent marker
  2. Add googly eyes with the hot glue or regular glue
  3. If desired, color the edge of the template to match the color of the glitter

To hang figures

  1. Thread a needle with the desired length of thread and gently push the needle through the glue near the top of the figure.
  2. Tie the thread around a chandelier, curtain rod, or any other place you would like to decorate

Picture Book Review

October 19 – It’s National Book Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-cover

About the Holiday

Holidays are always better with books! Books about holidays can make the time seem more festive, can teach you about other traditions, and can prolong the excitement for those one-day events. This month kids and adults celebrate Halloween, which combines the spooky and sweet into one fantastic extravaganza. Decorations, costumes, parties, special treats, and, of course, Halloween-themed books charge the cool, crisp weather with chills and little hearts with thrills.

Sir Simon: Super Scarer

By Cale Atkinson

 

Be careful as you open the book because if you’ve never seen a ghost, you’re about to—“Boo!” It’s ok if you were scared, the ghost says as he displays his business card, which reads “Sir Simon / Super Scarer / Ghostest with the mostest.” This professional scarer has “haunted and scared all sorts of things” from a whole forest and an unimpressed bear to a boat and a bus stop to a pizza, a ukulele, and a potato.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-house

Copyright Cale Atkinson, 2018, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Finally, though, Sir Simon is “being transferred to a house.” While Simon is happy about having a haunted house all to himself, he’s not so thrilled about all the Ghost chores a house requires. What kinds of chores? Well, all of those eerie sounds and creepy circumstances don’t happen by themselves. They’re all Simon “stomping in the attic” with an old shoe on each hand, “flushing the toilet” in the middle of the night, “hiding and moving stuff around,” and “standing creepy in the window wearing old-timey clothes.” And it’s only after these chores and more that Simon can do what he really likes to do.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-boat

Copyright Cale Atkinson, 2018, courtesy of Tundra Books.

It seems in his afterlife Simon likes to dabble in the arts, learn French, and even write a thriller. Once Simon is ensconced in his new digs, he hears that grandparents are going to be moving in. He’s happy with this news because on “the pyramid of haunting,” old people are at the top since they sleep a lot, require fewer chores, and are oblivious to ghostly presences. But just as Simon is welcoming his new family home, he discovers that it includes a kid. A kid who sees him right away. A kid who has a lot of questions and a lot of comments. A kid who wants to be a Ghost too.

Simon is more than a bit miffed at this turn of events. It means more chores and less free time. Unless… Simon suddenly thinks Chester “would make a top-notch Ghost.” He takes Chester up to the attic, where he just can’t help looking through all of Simon’s stuff—much to Simon’s consternation. Simon gets Chester all suited up in the appropriate Ghost garb, gives him a list of “activities,” and sends him on his way. First up is making scary animal noises.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-french

Copyright Cale Atkinson, 2018, courtesy of Tundra Books.

As Simon happily types away on his novel, he hears Chester’s “Moo. Mooooooo. MOOOOOOOOO!” Incensed, Simon finds Chester at the heating vent and lets him know that “spooky and cow do not go together.” In fact, Chester does not seem to have a scary gene in his body. After trying and failing at every chore on the list, Chester is so exhausted he falls asleep with a thud.

Simon puts Chester to bed and then looks around his room. He sees that he and Chester actually have a lot in common—from the ukulele to drawing and writing to moving a lot. But does Simon feel bad for tricking Chester into doing his chores? No! Well… yes. The next morning Simon comes to offer his help with Chester’s chores, but they’re not as easy as they look. Simon has to admit that while “Chester isn’t the best at being a Ghost,” he’s “not so hot at being a human.” But there is something that they are both good at and that’s being friends.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-chores

Copyright Cale Atkinson, 2018, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Cale Atkinson’s unique take on the ghostly life—or afterlife—is laugh-out-loud funny as Sir Simon Spookington goes about his spectral chores with pride tinged with exasperation at the time they take away from his preferred creative pursuits. When he discovers that a kid has moved into his house—and, what’s more, wants to be a ghost too—Atkinson’s apparition with attitude turns prickly with the disruption Chester causes and perfectionist when Chester’s haunting doesn’t live up to his standards. Simon’s strict chore schedule, his haunting pyramid, and his wisecracking responses to Chester are droll and hilarious, and Chester’s attempts at ghosting are silliness at their best.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-playing-together

Copyright Cale Atkinson, 2018, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Readers will fall in love with Simon from the moment they open the cover to find twenty-four snapshots of the little ghost doing his chores. Atkinson’s free-wheeling creativity makes each page a showstopper as this haunted house is packed full of clever details and allusions to favorite scary and adventure movies and books in every nook and cranny. Atkinson also uses juxtaposition to great effect in images of  Simon floating through his chores with a frown and furrowed brow followed by those of a happy and relaxed Simon as he paints, writes, and does cross-stitch as well as in two cutaways of the house—one at night while Chester does Simon’s chores and one during the day as Simon attempts to do Chester’s. The final spread of Simon and Chester hanging out as friends is endearing and heartwarming.

Sir Simon: Super Scarer is a must for fans of ghost stories, funny stories, and friendship stories and will be enjoyed by adults as much as by kids. This book will be asked for again and again, making it a spooktacular addition to home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 8 

Tundra, 2018 | ISBN 978-1101919095

National Book Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-haunted-graveyard-craft-3

Spooky Haunted Graveyard

 

With a few items found in a backyard or park and a few from home, kids can make a spooky haunted graveyard to decorate their room or add to the family’s Halloween décor.

Supplies

  • Ten to twelve small to medium stones that have a triangular or rounded shape and can stand on their own (or close enough to be glued down)
  • Shallow cardboard box or plastic container
  • Small sticks or branches for the tree
  • A small amount of dirt, small dry leaves, moss, etc.
  • Poly fill for the fog (optional)
  • White craft paint
  • Small bit of clay
  • Paint brush
  • Black marker
  • Hot glue gun or strong glue

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-haunted-graveyard-craft

Directions

To Make the Ghosts

  1. Paint 5 or 6 stones with the white paint, let dry
  2. Add eyes and mouth with the black marker

To Make the Tombstones

  1. Add RIP, names, and dates to 5 or 6 stones with the black marker

To Make the Tree

  1. Use one or two small branches or twigs to make the tree
  2. Stick them into the clay for stability

To Make the Graveyard

  1. Draw a fence inside and outside on the rim of the box (optional)
  2. Scatter the tombstones around the box and glue in place
  3. Scatter the ghosts near the tombstones and around the graveyard, and glue them in place
  4. Stick the small branches or twigs in the clay

To Make the Ground

  1. Scatter dirt, leaves, moss, around the tombstones and ghosts
  2. Add wispy bits of poly fill around the ghosts and tombstones and in the tree (optional)

Display the haunted graveyard!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-sir-simon-super-scarer-cover

You can find Sir Simon Super Scarer at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

October 15 – It’s Black Cat Awareness Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-cover

About the Holiday

There may be many pet holidays—and even cat holidays—but this month we celebrate one particular feline: the black cat. While black cats are just as cuddly and sweet as any other cat, the superstition that black cats bring bad luck make them the least adopted of all cats.  If you’re considering adopting a cat or kitten, think about giving a black cat a forever home.

The Scariest Book Ever

By Bob Shea

 

On the very first page a little ghost lets kids know just what kind of book they’re holding—a scary one! It’s so scary that even before the first page—back on the title page—there were “dark woods” that are “probably crawling with hungry monsters with smelly breath, sharp fangs, and pointy claws.” At least the ghost hopes so. He also hopes he doesn’t spill his orange juice on himself, but you know how that goes—once you think about something, it happens.

Now the ghost is soaking wet and naked as a window. He can’t go into the forest like that! He sends you off into the woods alone and promises to meet you “in a couple of pages.” You see that the woods are full of pointy trees, whose shadows all create arrows pointing to one particular spot. “Well?” the ghost asks, “What do you see? A dark hole?” The ghost’s wide, owl-like eyes glow from the darkness, and he warns readers that “nothing ever good comes out of a dark hole!” He reassures them that they can stay here and help “with the haunted housework” which includes cleaning the bathroom. “That’s scary, right?”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-forest

Copyright Bob Shea, 2017, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

But you go back, and what’s this? Out of the hole pops the cutest little bunny you ever did see! Her cheeks are pink and she’s wearing an adorable coat. A smiling snail, ladybug, and worm have also come to say hello. Back to the ghost who’s now up to his elbows in is rubber gloves (ghosts have elbows, right?). He wants to know all about the scary thing that came out of the hole. He’s even got some guesses: “Snakes made out of bees? A spider in a crabby mood? Broccoli?”

The ghost thinks the whole story of a sweet bunny is some kind of trick to get him into those frightening woods. But he’s happily scared right where he is, thank you very much. Can’t you see the ferocious black kitten lapping up milk with her little pink tongue? But you are pretty brave. Look at you–you just went back into the forest, where the bunny is giving out invitations to a Spooky Party to all of her friends.

The ghost wants to know what you saw…no he doesn’t…yes he does…no he doesn’t! Ok, so when he hears it, he doesn’t believe it. “Whimsical woodland creatures? Invitations? To a party? Nice try. What’s next, pumpkin picking in a pumpkin patch?” But as you’re leaving again, the ghost realizes his skepticism is a bit off-putting, so he tries to lure you back with doughnuts—“Spooooooooky doughnuts.” Meanwhile, the bunny is leading a parade through the forest, where the trees seem to be getting smaller and smaller. Sure enough the “whimsical woodland animals” have been visiting a pumpkin patch and these smiling little gourds are coming along to the party too.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-owl-eyes

Copyright Bob Shea, 2017, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

“OOOOOOOHHHHH….” No, the ghost isn’t trying to be scary; his belly just aches from all the doughnuts he ate. See them? If you think the story about the pumpkin patch is going to rouse the ghost, you’re sadly mistaken. The ghost thinks it’s just a tall tale and does a bit of scolding: “Gimme a break. You think I died yesterday? I’m not falling for that. I’m staying right here.” And while he’s at it, he’s upset that the kitten has been so frightened that all she can do is pounce and play with a soft pink ball of yarn.

But you know how readers are—always turning the page! So here we are, and everyone is doing crafts and eating treats. The ghost figures since he “didn’t hear any screaming” and there were just crafts and cupcakes that the “woods aren’t that scary after all.” He decides to drop in—but just to “save you from the cupcakes.” He means “the super scary monsters.” But what’s this?! Horrible monsters like bats and Frankenstein and bandits and jack o-lanterns. There’s even another ghost. “AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!”

The ghost zips away, giving you a very stern tougue lashing, “Why didn’t you warn me? Are you trying to scare me more to death?” But the kitty sets him straight about the whole costume party thing, so he goes back—kitty first though. And when he gets back, everyone’s taken off their costume, and the ghost can see who’s underneath. “Oh, ha, ha, ha! Very funny,” he chuckles. No one loves a costume party more than a naked ghost.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-party

Copyright Bob Shea, 2017, courtesy of Disney-Hyperion.

Bob Shea has written one scary funny book for little readers, who will guffaw at the juxtaposition of frightening and cute and the ghost’s examples of some pretty scary stuff. Shea’s chatty ghost who sends readers into the woods and then wheedles, scoffs, and chides them afterward is an adorably sympathetic spirit—one that kids will take to heart from the first page.

Shea’s unique style and humor as well as one very cool printing trick that allows for a “naked ghost” to appear on the page will make readers Oooo and Ahhhh—in a good way. Black- and blue-toned pages alternate with candlelight-yellow ones to mirror the little ghost’s deep, dark fears and the festive reality of the bunny’s party. The final reveal not only puts the ghost at ease but also any readers who may feel a bit of trepidation about Halloween or the unseen in general.

The Scariest Book Ever is not just for Halloween as readers will love the garrulous ghost and the giggly, gentle nudge to try something new any time of the year. The book makes for fun and dramatic read-aloud story times at home, in classrooms, and at the library.

Ages 4 – 7

Disney-Hyperion, 2017 | ISBN 978-1484730461

This could be the scariest The Scariest Book Ever book trailer!

Black Cat Awareness Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cat-and-pumpkin-coloring-page

Cats and Pumpkin Coloring Page

Halloween may be scary, but these two kittens and happy pumpkin are sweet! Give yourself a treat and enjoy this printable Cats and Pumpkin Coloring Page.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-scariest-book-ever-cover

You can find The Scariest Book Ever at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

YYPicture Book Review