November 5 – Job Action Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-business-pig-cover

About the Holiday

Job Action Day was created in 2008 as a day for job seekers and employees to assess their career goals and take action to make them a reality. Today, experts across the web and in participating companies offer special seminars and training sessions to provide the latest in career advice. Today’s holiday, which is sponsored by LiveCareer, gives people a chance to reflect on what is most important in their life. Are you doing the job you’re passionate about? Are you bringing your passions to the job you are doing? If you are unhappy or dissatisfied with your position, take another look at your job and where it leads. It’s possible that new opportunities lie within your current job—you never know where a particular job will lead you until you put all your creativity, knowledge, and—most importantly—unique personality—into it. If your current job doesn’t offer these kinds of opportunities, today is a good day to polish that resume and begin a search for a better fit.

Business Pig

By Andrea Zuill

 

When Jelly Bean gave birth to five piglets at the Sunshine Sanctuary for Farm Animals, one was a standout. Dressed in a pinstripe suit and tie and drinking from a mug, he smiled at the farmer and two volunteers. “What kind of pig is that?” one volunteer asked. “Well, I believe what we have here is a gen-u-wine Business Pig,” the farmer answered. The little girl volunteer named him Jasper.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-business-pig-born

Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2018, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Right from the start, Jasper didn’t like playing in the mud, and instead of rooting for grubs with his snout, he used a shovel. “Everyone at the sanctuary loved little Jasper. But that didn’t keep him from feeling out of place.” So the volunteers made him an office in the corner of the barn with a hay bale desk, a comfortable chair, and a computer. They gave him a job helping with the bookkeeping. When Jasper held a meeting, everyone came “to show their support.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-business-pig-no-mud

Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2018, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

But when it came right down to it, some of the animals didn’t understand him. The chickens ignored his flow charts, “and the goat ate his business card.” And no one seemed to want him as a pet. Jasper decided to be proactive. He wrote articles for the newspaper touting the benefits of pigs as pets, he hung out billboards, and he tacked signs with pull-off tabs onto electrical posts. Then he waited.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-business-pig-charts

Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2018, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Soon a little girl carrying a briefcase visited the sanctuary. She studied Jasper’s flow charts, “wanted to exchange business cards with him,” and carefully read his résumé. Jasper was pleased with the interview, “but upper management had to be consulted.” Fortunately, the little girl’s mother was also impressed, and Jasper went home with his “perfect fit.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-business-pig-resume

Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2018, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Andrea Zuill’s Jasper will make you swoon. Adorable doesn’t go far enough to describe the absolute perfect expressions on this piglet’s face as he meets the volunteers, sees his office for the first time, reacts to having his business card devoured, and with hope hands out his résumé. Jasper’s gestures are equally as endearing and will make readers’—kids and adults—hearts swell. Zuill’s story is humorous in its use of business jargon (Jasper is “smart, outgoing, proactive,” and enlists the help of his contacts), uplifting in the way the sanctuary’s volunteers and animals support the little pig, and emotionally resonant when this diminutive businessman is passed over for adoption. Kids will feel good all over when the piglet finally meets his perfect match and gets the “job” he’s been searching for.

With both laugh-out-loud and heartwarming moments, Business Pig would make a much-loved gift and addition to home, classroom, and library bookshelves that will be asked for again and again. 

Ages 3 – 7

Sterling Children’s Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1454926849

Discover more about Andrea Zuill, her books, and her art on her website.

Job Action Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-briefcase-craft

Briefcase Craft

 

Every business kid needs a briefcase! With this easy-to-make craft and printable Dream Job Application, young talents will be taking the world by storm in no time!

Supplies

Directions

To Make the Body of the Briefcase

  1. Cut a rectangle of poster board in proportion to child’s size. Leave ½ inch on either side of the shorter cut to glue the briefcase together. The longer side should be double the height you’d like the finished briefcase to be. (My example was made from a 12-inch by 20-inch strip.)
  2. Fold the poster board in half
  3. Glue the side edges together

To Make the Handle

  1. Cut a narrow strip of poster board
  2. Fold the right side of the strip toward you and down, pinching it tight; repeat on the left side

Print out the Dream Job Application and fill it in!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-business-pig-cover

You can find Business Pig at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

September 9 – National Hug Your Hound Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hoiund-cover

About the Holiday

Of course you love your pooch, but have you ever thought about life from their point of view? What does the world look like from their perspective? How does the grass or sidewalk feel under their paws? What hat makes that so enticing? And what are they really thinking when dressed up for Halloween? Today’s holiday encourages people to really observe their dog in their home and outdoor environment to make sure they have everything they need to be healthy and happy. Which, of course, includes lots of hugs!

George the Hero Hound

By Jeffrey Ebbeler

 

“George was a good old hound dog” and the best kind of farm dog. Even before the rooster crowed, he was helping Farmer Fritz with his chores. Farmer Fritz needed a lot of help because there were always slop buckets to carry, the old rusty tractor was always breaking down, and the cows were always “plotting to get out and feast on the cornfield.” But it wasn’t so bad because there was always an afternoon nap on the porch waiting for him. In fact, “he had a good life for a hound dog.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-cover-house

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

But one day Farmer Fritz packed up his belonging, put on a Hawaiian shirt and caught the bus to a retirement cabana on the beach where cows, pigs, and, sadly, even dogs weren’t allowed. But George wasn’t alone for long. Soon the Gladstone family moved in with all of their city apartment things and two kids, Owen and Olive. The Gladstones were happy to see the old hound dog. The little boy wanted to be the one to name him.

“George could tell right away that the Gladstone family would need a whole heap of help. There’d be no afternoon naps on the porch for a while.” When Mr. Gladstone tried to fix the tractor, it was George who found the missing part that made it work. When Mr. Gladstone saw that the old dog camouflaged among the rusty tractor parts, he said, “Maybe we should call you Rusty.” But before that name could take hold, the tractor took off on its own. When the tractor smashed through the cows’ fence, George went to work rounding them up and herding “those sneaky cows back into their pen, where they belonged.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-tractor

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

George toddled into the house for a drink of water, but Mrs. Gladstone swept him right back out again, saying, “You are the dustiest dog! I ought to call you Dusty.” George loped off to his dog house when something blue fluttering from a tree caught his attention. Owen came running. It was Olive’s blue scarf, but where was Olive? “George took a good sniff of Olive’s ribbon—he was a hound dog, after all—and off they went.” George followed the scent through the corn field, across a stream, and over a hill. There they found Olive having a tea party with a chicken.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-cover-tractor-works

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

Owen thought George was such a good tracker that they should call him Rover. Happy to have helped find Olive, George figured he’d certainly get his nap now. But they reached the farm just in time to see the tractor crash into the barn and Mrs. Gladstone, who was up a ladder, drop her can of red paint. It landed on George’s head, turning him…”Red!” It was Olive’s first word. Maybe, thought Owen, Red would be a good name for the old hound.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-cover-tfixing-ractor

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

After that day George didn’t get too many naps. But that was okay. Turned out “that he liked herding Olive a lot more than he liked herding cows.” He also taught the Gladstones everything he knew about running the farm and dealing “with those crafty cows.” George was so clever he even devised a plan to “drum up business” on Farmer Fritz’s beach, where the retirees loved the Gladstone’s sweet corn. “Now, if only George could teach his new family one last thing…his name!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-red-paint

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

Jeffrey Ebbeler’s sweet hound dog George will capture readers’ hearts as he manages the farm, the wily cows, and the clueless Gladstones with good humor and aplomb. With such a good nature and so many talents, it’s no surprise that George is special to each family member. Ebbeler’s vibrant illustrations are full of humor that will keep kids laughing as the cows plan their escapes, Farmer Fritz and Mr. Gladstone tinker with the tractor on the fritz, and a goggle-eyed chicken becomes Olive’s playmate. Kids will especially like hunting for all the cows hiding, showering, camping, hot-air ballooning, and getting into other shenanigans throughout the book.

A fun and funny read aloud, George the Hero Hound is a day-brightener for any story time at home or in the classroom.

Ages 4 – 8

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503941762

Discover more about Jeffrey Ebbeler, his books, and his art on his website.

National Hug Your Hound Day Activity

CPB - Dog Biscuits

Homemade Dog Biscuits

 

These homemade dog biscuits are fun to make and a special treat for your dog. Why not get together with your friends and make a batch? Then share them with your pets, or consider making some for dogs who need a little extra love at your local shelter.

  • Children should get help from an adult when using the oven.

Supplies

  • 1 large bowl
  • Large spoon or whisk
  • Cookie cutters – shaped like traditional dog bones or any favorite shape

Ingredients

  • 3 cups Buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup powdered milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup water
  • 1/3 cup margarine or butter, melted
  • 1 egg beaten

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees
  2. Add buckwheat flour to bowl
  3. Add powdered milk to bowl
  4. Add salt to bowl
  5. Stir to mix dry ingredients
  6. Add water
  7. Add melted margarine or butter
  8. Add egg
  9. Stir until liquid is absorbed
  10. Knead for a few minutes to form a dough
  11. If the dough is too dry, add a little more water, one Tablespoon at a time
  12. Place the dough on a board
  13. Roll dough to ½ inch thickness
  14. Cut into shapes with cookie cutters
  15. Bake at 325 degrees for 35 minutes
  16. Biscuits will be hard when cool.

Makes about 40 biscuits.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hoiund-cover

You can find George the Hero Hound at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

Picture Book Review

 

June 23 – It’s National Dairy Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-symphony-of-cowbells-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was established in 1937 as National Milk Month to encourage people to drink more milk to stabilize the dairy industry during a time of surplus. The event grew to celebrate all the benefits provided by the dairy industry around the world. The name was changed when the National Dairy Council took over promotion of the holiday. 

A Symphony of Cowbells

Written by Heather Preusser | Illustrated by Eileen Ryan Ewen

 

With the dawning of spring, Gimmelwald came alive with the “Da-ding, da-ding. Jingle-jangle, jingle-jangle. Clang-clong-clank, clang-clong-clank” of bells as the cows were led to the sweet, green grass in the high meadows. The cows’ milk would become “scrumptious cheese…sold by the wedge, wheel, and wagonload.” As Petra walked with her family’s herd, she led her favorite cow, Elfi, who “wore the most booming brass bell of all.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-symphony-of-cowbells-no-bell

Image copyright Eileen Ryan Ewen, text copyright Heather Preusser. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

But one day Elfi’s bell was missing. Petra’s father told her they had a schedule to keep and that Elfi would have to go without her bell, but Elfi wouldn’t hear of it. She stomped her hoof and stood her ground. No amount of pushing, pulling or prodding could move Elfi from her spot. Petra ran and retrieved a tiny tin bell to hang around Elfi’s neck, but Elfi only “sniffed and snorted at the embarrassing tinkling. Tittle-tattle-tink, tittle-tattle, tink.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-symphony-of-cowbells-stubborn-elfi

Image copyright Eileen Ryan Ewen, text copyright Heather Preusser. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Without Elfi to lead them, Petra’s other cows lay down in the meadow and refused to move as well. “‘No milk? No cheese? What’ll we do?’ Petra gulped.” She begged Elfi to get up, but Elfi simply gazed at Petra with “eyes wide as milk saucers.” Petra knew she had to find Elfi’s bell. She searched the house, looked in the barn, and combed the field, but didn’t find the bell. The sun went down, and “the stubborn cows remained rooted among the bellflowers.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-symphony-of-cowbells-tiny-bell

Image copyright Eileen Ryan Ewen, text copyright Heather Preusser. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

In the morning, Petra spied a crow with something shiny in its beak. She ran after it and discovered the bird’s huge nest high on a cliff. She was much too small to reach it, so she called her father, her mother, and a couple of neighbors. They piled on top of one another, and as Petra teetered on her mother’s shoulders, she reached into the nest and pulled out…Mr. Schmid’s pocket watch, Miss Baumann’s reading glasses, Farmer Felber’s wrench, Mother’s bracelet, Father’s keys, and…Elfi’s brass bell!

Petra skipped all the way to where Elfi and the other cows were keeping their protest, the brass bell announcing “Brrring-BONG, brrring-BONG. Brrring-BONG, brrring-BONG” all the way. When Elfi saw her bell, she danced with joy. Petra placed the bell over Elfi’s head and kissed her velvety nose. The other cows took notice. “On cue, they stood and moseyed up the mountainside….The symphony of cowbells was harmonious again—and LOUD. It was springtime in Gimmelwald after all.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-symphony-of-cowbells-clanging-bells

Image copyright Eileen Ryan Ewen, text copyright Heather Preusser. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Heather Preusser’s enchanting Swiss tale of tenderhearted but stubborn Elfi will delight readers with its musical mystery and gentle humor. Kids will love hearing and reading along with the melodic verses of jingling cowbells sprinkled throughout the text. Preusser’s lyrical phrasing is as fresh as the mountain air and will transport children to the beautiful Swiss countryside.

A Symphony of Cowbells is a perfect example of text and illustrations working together to present the story and add layered details that elevate the reading experience. Eileen Ryan Ewen’s gorgeously detailed and charming paintings take readers to the heart of Gimmelwald, with its glorious mountain backdrop, quaint village architecture, and cozy homes decorated with Alpen cuckoo clocks, dainty curtains, and window boxes overflowing with flowers.

Along the way Ewen frames a consecutive story along the bottom of most pages. Through these panels, eagle-eyed readers will notice a curious happenstance occurring in Gimmelwald which just may explain a few things…. It’s not until the end, however, that kids discover the answer to the story’s mystery.

A Symphony of Cowbells is a captivating and humorous look at country life with a little science sprinkled in. Readers may be enticed to do a little more research into the animal behaviors that influenced the story. The book would make a lovely addition to any child’s home library.

Ages 5 – 8

Sleeping Bear Press, 2017 | ISBN 978-1585369683

To learn more about Heather Preusser and her book as well as see a video about the real Gimmelwald, visit her website!

Discover more about Eileen Ryan Ewen and view a portfolio of her illustration work on her website!

National Dairy Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bell-bookmark-a-symphony-of-cowbells

Ring a Bell for Reading Bookmark

 

It’s easy to make a stylish bookmark that can ring out your love of reading while marking your page!

Supplies

  • 3 shoelaces or ribbon of different designs
  • Small “sleigh” bells or other bellscelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bell-bookmark-a-symphony-of-cowbells

Directions

  1. Hold three shoelaces together and knot them together at the top
  2. Braid the shoelaces together as long as you want your bookmark to be
  3. At the end, string three or more bells onto the ends of the shoelaces and knot the shoelaces together to hold the braid closed.
  4. Alternately, you can knot the braid at the end and tie a group of bells to the end.
  5. The end with the bells becomes the top of the bookmark.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-symphony-of-cowbells-cover

You can find A Symphony of Cowbells at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Millon | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 19 – National Let’s Laugh Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hoiund-cover

About the Holiday

This world-wide holiday encourages laughter—that spontaneous emotion that makes things better. Humor is universally embraced, bringing together people from all walks of life to enjoy a bit of fun or craziness together. To celebrate today, think back to some times when you had a really good laugh, when something or someone surprised you with the unexpected, or to your favorite funny childhood TV show, movie, or book. Then enjoy the day with your friends, your kids, your pets… or all three with today’s book!

George the Hero Hound

By Jeffrey Ebbeler

 

“George was a good old hound dog” and the best kind of farm dog. Even before the rooster crowed, he was helping Farmer Fritz with his chores. Farmer Fritz needed a lot of help because there were always slop buckets to carry, the old rusty tractor was always breaking down, and the cows were always “plotting to get out and feast on the cornfield.” But it wasn’t so bad because there was always an afternoon nap on the porch waiting for him. In fact, “he had a good life for a hound dog.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-cover-house

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

But one day Farmer Fritz packed up his belonging, put on a Hawaiian shirt and caught the bus to a retirement cabana on the beach where cows, pigs, and, sadly, even dogs weren’t allowed. But George wasn’t alone for long. Soon the Gladstone family moved in with all of their city apartment things and two kids, Owen and Olive. The Gladstones were happy to see the old hound dog. The little boy wanted to be the one to name him.

“George could tell right away that the Gladstone family would need a whole heap of help. There’d be no afternoon naps on the porch for a while.” When Mr. Gladstone tried to fix the tractor, it was George who found the missing part that made it work. When Mr. Gladstone saw that the old dog camouflaged among the rusty tractor parts, he said, “Maybe we should call you Rusty.” But before that name could take hold, the tractor took off on its own. When the tractor smashed through the cows’ fence, George went to work rounding them up and herding “those sneaky cows back into their pen, where they belonged.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-tractor

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

George toddled into the house for a drink of water, but Mrs. Gladstone swept him right back out again, saying, “You are the dustiest dog! I ought to call you Dusty.” George loped off to his dog house when something blue fluttering from a tree caught his attention. Owen came running. It was Olive’s blue scarf, but where was Olive? “George took a good sniff of Olive’s ribbon—he was a hound dog, after all—and off they went.” George followed the scent through the corn field, across a stream, and over a hill. There they found Olive having a tea party with a chicken.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-cover-tractor-works

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

Owen thought George was such a good tracker that they should call him Rover. Happy to have helped find Olive, George figured he’d certainly get his nap now. But they reached the farm just in time to see the tractor crash into the barn and Mrs. Gladstone, who was up a ladder, drop her can of red paint. It landed on George’s head, turning him…”Red!” It was Olive’s first word. Maybe, thought Owen, Red would be a good name for the old hound.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-cover-tfixing-ractor

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

After that day George didn’t get too many naps. But that was okay. Turned out “that he liked herding Olive a lot more than he liked herding cows.” He also taught the Gladstones everything he knew about running the farm and dealing “with those crafty cows.” George was so clever he even devised a plan to “drum up business” on Farmer Fritz’s beach, where the retirees loved the Gladstone’s sweet corn. “Now, if only George could teach his new family one last thing…his name!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-george-the-hero-hound-red-paint

Copyright Jeffrey Ebbeler, 2018, courtesy of jefferyebberley.com.

Jeffrey Ebbeler’s sweet hound dog George will capture readers’ hearts as he manages the farm, the wily cows, and the clueless Gladstones with good humor and aplomb. With such a good nature and so many talents, it’s no surprise that George is special to each family member. Ebbeler’s vibrant illustrations are full of humor that will keep kids laughing as the cows plan their escapes, Farmer Fritz and Mr. Gladstone tinker with the tractor on the fritz, and a goggle-eyed chicken becomes Olive’s playmate. Kids will especially like hunting for all the cows hiding, showering, camping, hot-air ballooning, and getting into other shenanigans throughout the book.

A fun and funny read aloud, George the Hero Hound is a day-brightener for any story time at home or in the classroom.

Ages 4 – 8

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503941762

Discover more about Jeffrey Ebbeler, his books, and his art on his website.

National Let’s Laugh Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-silly-balloons

Silly Balloons

 

You can have lots of silly fun with balloons! Try some of these ideas—they’re sure to make you laugh!

Goofy Faces

Blow up a balloon and draw a funny face on it. Rub the balloon on your shirt or a blanket and stick it to the wall, your shirt, or even your mom or dad!

Crazy Hair

Rub a blown-up balloon on your shirt or a blanket (fleece works well) then hold it near your hair and watch it go a little crazy!

Bend Water

This bit of balloon magic will amaze you! Rub a blown-up balloon on a blanket (fleece works well). Turn on a faucet to a thin stream of water. Hold the balloon near the stream of water and watch it bend toward the balloon. 

Volleyballoon

This is a fun game for two or more people played like volleyball—but with balloons! All you need is a balloon and a line on the floor. Players form teams and bat the balloon back and forth over the line, keeping it in the air.as long as possible. A team wins a point when the opposing team can’t return the balloon.

Picture Book Review

February 2 – It’s National Women Inventors Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-cover

About the Holiday

This month we celebrate all the women, past and present, who have changed the world for the better with their inventions and innovations! Every day, women are working in all industries researching and creating the next products, services, medicines, machinery, games, and some things we can’t even imagine yet that will revolutionize the way we live. Who are these women? They might be your friends, neighbors, sisters, daughters—or maybe even you! To celebrate this month, read up on amazing women inventors, and, if you have a big idea, work to get it noticed and on the market!

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin

Written by Julia Finley Mosca | Illustrated by Daniel Rieley

 

If you feel different and sometimes discouraged, the story of Temple Grandin may help you see that everyone has a talent and their own place in the world. Temple was born in Boston and “unique from the start, / an unusual girl, / she loved spinning in circles / and watching things twirl.” Loud sounds, big crowds, bright lights, and scratchy clothes disturbed her. And she did not like to get a “big squeezy hug.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-too-loud

Image copyright Daniel Rieley, 2017, text copyright Julia Finley Mosca, 2017. Courtesy of The Innovation Press.

When she became overloaded with stress and frustration, Temple was known to “kick, holler, bang, shrieeeeek! Yet, still, by age three, not one word did she speak.” People told Temple’s parents that she’d never be normal and to send her away, but her mother would not hear of it. With a lot of work, special teachers helped Temple learn to talk. “And that thing with her brain… / it was AUTISM, see? / She was ‘different not less,’ / they all finally agreed.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-doctor

Image copyright Daniel Rieley, 2017, text copyright Julia Finley Mosca, 2017. Courtesy of The Innovation Press.

While Temple was like her peers in many ways, she interacted with words differently. “If something was mentioned, / for instance, a fly, / in her mind, she’d see dozens / of PHOTOS buzz by.” Her different view point made it hard for her at school. The other kids chased her and teased her for the way that she acted and for “…saying things / over and over. / and over… / and over… / AND over.” When she had finally had enough, “she threw a book at a kid / and was kicked out of school!” No one understood Temple and Temple couldn’t understand them.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-fly

Image copyright Daniel Rieley, 2017, text copyright Julia Finley Mosca, 2017. Courtesy of The Innovation Press.

Her mother then sent her to visit her aunt, who lived on a ranch out west. Here, among the animals, Temple felt better. Her favorites were the cows, so silent and sweet. “At a NEW school that fall, / Temple found more support / said a teacher who taught her: / ‘You’ll never fall short.” That teacher was right, and at engineering and science she felt right at home.

Her first invention—made from memory—was “a machine / like she’d seen on some farms, / an INVENTION that hugged her / with boards, and not arms.” In this device she felt snug and calm, just like the cows. As she began to succeed, Temple came to see that her attention to detail was a benefit, and she began to feel special. Then she learned about farms where the cows were not treated kindly and resolved to change that.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-cows

Image copyright Daniel Rieley, 2017, text copyright Julia Finley Mosca, 2017. Courtesy of The Innovation Press.

She went on to college and became an expert on farms, earning three degrees. Telling people about her ideas for farming improvements was sometimes scary because they ignored her and, well…weren’t very sweet. But she didn’t give up. She learned more about cattle, like why they circle and moo. “To build better farms / was her goal—she would do it. / ‘Be KIND to our creatures. / They have FEELINGS!’ She knew it.”

It took time, but people began to see that Temple was right, and farm after farm implemented her ideas. She won awards for this work and other ideas, a movie was made about her life, and she now travels the world telling her story and teaching: “‘Each person is special– / so UNIQUE are our minds. / This world needs YOUR ideas. / It takes brains of ALL kinds!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-letter

Image copyright Daniel Rieley, 2017, text copyright Julia Finley Mosca, 2017. Courtesy of The Innovation Press.

A letter from Temple Grandin to young readers, extensive information about Temple and tidbits from her interview with the author, a timeline of her life, and resources follow the text.

Julia Finley Mosca’s insightful biography of Temple Grandin offers inspiration and encouragement to children at those times when life seems difficult or if they feel misunderstood. Childhood can be filled with moments—both small and large, short or long—when comfort and reassurance are needed. Mosca’s rhyming verses make Temple’s story accessible to a wide age range of readers while providing an inclusive way to show how autism creates a different way of experiencing the world. Temple’s supportive teachers are role models for all educators. Temple Grandin’s fascinating life demonstrates that there is a niche for everyone and that through understanding, perseverance, and acceptance, all children can go far.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-girl-who-thought-in-pictures-cows-in-field

Image copyright Daniel Rieley, 2017, text copyright Julia Finley Mosca, 2017. Courtesy of The Innovation Press.

Daniel Rieley’s cartoon-style illustrations will resonate with readers as Temple takes in everything she sees with wide-open eyes and interprets it in her own way—even before she can speak. The separation between Temple and the other students at her first school is poignantly communicated in a two-page spread in which pointing hands and a lobbed ball of paper appear from the left-hand margin and Temple reads alone on the far side of the right-hand page. Temple’s ability to think in pictures is demonstrated throughout the book with inset images. Readers see some of the farming practices Temple wanted to change, her original drawings, and the resulting equipment now used on farms to improve the conditions of the animals raised there.

The Girl Who Thought in Pictures: The Story of Dr. Temple Grandin is a moving and motivational story for all children and is a must for school and public libraries.

Ages 5 – 10

The Innovation Press, 2017 | ISBN  978-1943147304

Discover more about Julia Finley Mosca and her Amazing Scientists series on the Amazing Scientists website.

Learn more about Daniel Rieley, his books, and his art on his website.

National Women Inventors Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-women-in-stem-coloring-book

Historical Women in STEM Coloring Book

 

From civil engineering to chemistry and botany from radio waves to computer programming, the five women in this coloring book changed science and the world. Enjoy coloring the pages and learning about these amazing women in this printable: Historical Women in STEM Coloring Book

Picture Book Review

January 17 – It’s Hobby Month

celebrate-picture-books-pciture-book-review-prudence-the-part-time-cow-cover

About the Holiday

Hobbies are great! They give us the chance to explore our creative side, form friendships, travel, and get away from the stresses of daily life. Sometimes hobbies can even lead to better and more satisfying careers. This month celebrate your hobby! Throw a party for others who share your passion, consider signing up with an online site to sell your wares, or join a group of like-minded people. It’s also a wonderful time to share your talents with others—like the protagonist of today’s story! 

Prudence the Part-Time Cow

Written by Jody Jensen Shaffer | Illustrated by Stephanie Laberis

 

Out in the pasture swatting flies with her tail and lumbering along with the rest of the herd, “Prudence looked like a full-time cow.” But when she had a little time off from her bovine duties, Prudence “was a part-time cow.” While being milked she was a scientist, reading a book on the milking process that she found “udderly amazing.” The salt licks were perfect blocks for architect Prudence’s wondrous structures. And engineer Prudence experimented with automatic lighting, even if the results in the water trough were a bit electrifying.

celebrate-picture-books-pciture-book-review-prudence-the-part-time-cow-farm

Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

The other cows didn’t like it. They wanted Prudence to be more like them. She would never fit into the herd, they whispered to each other. Prudence fretted. She wanted to have friends and fit in, so “she decided to try to be like the others.” Dutifully, she went down to the pond with the rest of the herd for a little refreshment and was doing fine until… “she calculated the water temperature and wind speed. ‘Sixty-eight degrees and four miles per hour.’”

celebrate-picture-books-pciture-book-review-prudence-the-part-time-cow-tree-huddling

Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

The other cows were miffed, especially Bessie, who said “‘Cows don’t calculate,’” while carefully counting her calves as she called them from the pond. Another day as the herd lazed under a tree, Prudence joined them, leaving only once to create a hat from an old wagon wheel, scrap of cloth, and piece of rope she found nearby. The other cows snorted. “‘Cows don’t create,’ said Patty as she jostled to find some shade.”

Even sleeping the same way as the others was difficult for Prudence. When she had a brainstorm in the middle of the night she just had to explore it—no matter how noise she made. The herd had given up. Alone and sad, Prudence thought and thought of ways to make the others like her. Then it hit her! “‘Cow Power!’” That night the barn rang with the sounds of her idea. But it wasn’t only one idea! When the herd woke and saw yet another contraption, they rolled their eyes and said “‘Not again, Prudence! What is this mess?’” Until…

celebrate-picture-books-pciture-book-review-prudence-the-part-time-cow-cow-power

Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

Bessie saw the “cow-culator” Prudence had made to help her keep track of her calves. Patty was thrilled with the “portable shade tree” made from an umbrella, a saddle, and some dangly adornments. And Spotz thought his new guitar made from a shovel and fishing line was “gnarly.” Prudence was suddenly pretty popular! Even though “she knew she would always be a part-time cow,” she was happy to feel like a “full-time member of the herd.”

celebrate-picture-books-pciture-book-review-prudence-the-part-time-cow-happy-animals

Image copyright Stephanie Laberis, 2017, text copyright Jody Jensen Shaffer, 2017. Courtesy of Henry Holt & Co,

Jody Jensen Shaffer’s moooving and funny story of a cow with a scientific bent will delight kids. Little ones who think differently will empathize with Prudence’s wish to be herself while also fitting in with the herd. As the cows stand around in a pond and huddle under a tree, Shaffer offers a wink to the crowd mentality and peer pressure that can foster inaction and clone-like behavior. Prudence makes a gentle, but determined role model as a thinker who won’t be cowed by others’ opinions.

Stephanie Laberis’s cartoon-inspired illustrations of a herd of very distinct cows are a perfect accompaniment to this humorous story with a meaningful message. Prudence, with her fluff of pink hair, is happiest when fulfilling her creative visions. As the other cows disparage her efforts and isolate her from the herd, Prudence’s sad eyes and droopy tail and ears make the effect of their words obvious. Each page offers an opportunity for readers to discuss diversity, individuality, and what it means to be a friend.

Prudence the Part-Time Cow would be a wonderful addition to school and classroom libraries as well as to home bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Henry Holt and Co, 2017 | ISBN 978-1627796156

Find out all about Jody Jensen Shaffer and her books and magazine writing for children on her website!

Discover a gallery of illustration and craft work by Stephanie Laberis on her website!

Hobby Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cow-mug-craftMooo Mug

 

Milk—regular or chocolate!—will taste so much better in a Mooo Mug  you make yourself! 

Supplies

  • White ceramic mug, available at craft stores
  • Black permanent marker or paint for ceramics
  • Pink permanent marker or paint for ceramics
  • Brown permanent marker or paint for ceramics

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-cow-mug-craft-back

Directions

  1. With the pink marker or paint, draw an oval shape for the nose near the bottom of the mug. Let dry.
  2. With the brown marker or paint, draw two angled nostrils inside the pink oval and color them in. Let dry.
  3. Color in the nose with the pink marker or paint.
  4. With the black marker, color the top tip of the handle where it meets the mug to make the tail.
  5. With the black marker or paint, draw two wavy lines on either side of the face starting at the top, angling toward the middle and returning to the bottom of the mug. Leave white space between the lines.
  6. Draw circles for eyes within the black lines. Add black pupils at the bottom of the eyes.
  7. Color inside the black lines and around the eyes to make the face markings.
  8. With the black marker or paint, make two or three splotches on the back of the mug.
  9. Let the mug dry and follow the directions for the markers or paint to set the color.
  10. Pour yourself a mooo mug of milk and enjoy!

Picture Book Review

June 8 – Upsy-Daisy Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-cover

About the Holiday

Do you wake up before the alarm or do you hit the snooze button a couple of times? Do you bound out of bed or do you pull the covers up tighter? Do you greet your family with a cheery “Good Morning” or do you mumble an incoherent “gmmmphngg?” If you’re more the latter type of person, then today’s holiday encourages you to be a happy “upsy-daisy” who starts the day with enthusiasm and an optimistic outlook. Beginning the day fresh as a daisy helps the whole day go better!

A Crow of His Own

Written by Megan Dowd Lambert | Illustrated by David Hyde Costello

 

When fame and fortune came calling for Larry, the charismatic rooster of Sunrise Farm, the daily routine turned upside down. “The animals overslept and no one knew what to do.” But while the cow, horse, sheep, chickens, and goose fretted, Farmer Jay and Farmer Kevin had a plan. One day they gathered all the animals and introduced Clyde, the new rooster. Looking at the “scrawny little guy” as he stammered his hello, the cow, horse, and sheep expressed doubt in his abilities, already comparing him to their beloved Larry.

Roberta, the goose, stepped forward, however, and reassured him that “they just miss Larry.” When Clyde asked who Larry was, the animals gasped. “Only the best rooster ever,” claimed the sheep. “Take it straight from my mouth: he was more than that,” said the horse. “He was a genius,” the cow chimed in.” And the chickens? In the dirt they scratched a heart with Larry and XOX in the center.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-clyde-joins-the-farm

Image copyright David Hyde Costello, text copyright Megan Dowd Lambert. Courtesy of Charlesbridge

Clyde was worried—how could he ever live up to Larry? Roberta tried to soothe him. “‘Larry wasn’t a genius…he just made quite a show of it.” Emboldened and with an inkling of what he needed to do, Clyde thanked Roberta and dashed off. “Clyde spent the whole day gathering props, designing his costume, and choreographing a sublime two-step.” As Clyde gave himself one last look in the mirror in his top hat and cloak, he had misgivings. “Could he put on a show of a crow?” He went to bed, but hardly slept at all.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-sleeping

Image copyright David Hyde Costello, text copyright Megan Dowd Lambert. Courtesy of Charlesbridge

In the morning…well…Clyde overslept. The animals were not happy. “Who ever heard of a rooster sleeping in?” baaad mouthed the sheep. “What a worthless chicken,” complained the horse. And the cow had issues of her own. Once again Roberta came to Clyde’s defense. With a wagon full of new props and material, Clyde rushed away to prepare for the next day. Up bright and early and balanced on a unicycle atop the coop while surrounded by promotional signs, Clyde “opened his beak, and…promptly fell to the ground with an undignified croak.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-skating-ramp

Image copyright David Hyde Costello, text copyright Megan Dowd Lambert. Courtesy of Charlesbridge

Poor Clyde! Humiliated and hurt he once again had to endure the slights of the farmyard animals, but their comments only spurred him on. Vowing to go bigger and better, Clyde built himself a ramp, ordered roller skates for birds and a parachute, and designed a colorful Western-themed set. “‘Oh, my!’” remarked Farmer Jay as he walked by. “‘Try, try again,’ encouraged Farmer Kevin.” But in the morning Clyde’s spectacular trick left him hanging upside down from the chicken coop, and the animals more “disgruntled and dismayed” than before.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-ramp

Image copyright David Hyde Costello, text copyright Megan Dowd Lambert. Courtesy of Charlesbridge

Clyde was distraught. “‘Forget about Larry.’” Roberta said. “‘Just crow your own crow.’” Clyde considered her advice. The next morning as the sky turned pink and orange with the rising sun, Clyde stood tall atop the chicken coop. He quietly cleared his throat and then—“COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO!” The newly awakened animals came running. Even Farmer Jay and Farmer Kevin came to see this new Clyde. The horse summed up their collective feeling: “It’s not so much like crowing, but crooning.” Roberta agreed. “‘Enough to give you goose bumps!’” she exclaimed. As an encore, “Clyde took a deep breath, gave a shake of his comb, and called out another crow of his own.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-sunrise

Image copyright David Hyde Costello, text copyright Megan Dowd Lambert. Courtesy of Charlesbridge

These days it’s nearly impossible for kids not to compare themselves or be compared to others—even those they’ve never met. All they need to do is jump on the Internet and discover that so-and-so has double, triple, or more friends and/or followers than they do; go to class and get their grade on that assignment they worked so hard on; or simply stand by their locker, go to lunch, or head out to gym and overhear the comments of other students. Avoidance isn’t the answer, but a good base of self-confidence and personal identity is. In A Crow of His Own Megan Dowd Lambert offers readers such a base in her entertaining and meaningful tribute to self-acceptance and love that hits all the right notes.

As soon as scrawny Clyde walks out of his crate to the scorn of his farm mates, kids will root for this underchicken. With a light touch and plenty of wordplay, Dowd deftly presents honest portrayals of the opposition Clyde is up against as well as Clyde’s distressed reactions. Clyde’s three attempts to act like Larry humorously demonstrate the difficulties of trying to be someone you’re not. When Clyde finally musters the courage to “crow his own crow” and is met with praise, readers will see that their own unique talents will find an appreciative audience.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-a-crow-of-his-own-sunrise-farm

Image copyright David Hyde Costello, text copyright Megan Dowd Lambert. Courtesy of Charlesbridge

David Hyde Costello knows how to put on a show! His Sunrise Farm is a gentle, bucolic spread still under the thrall of Larry. Humorous details, such as the valentines to Larry the chickens draw in the dirt, the movie house-style posters on the side of the barn, and the surprised and exasperated expressions of the animals, testify to Larry’s enduring legacy. But careful observers will notice that while Larry is a rather bland white rooster with some black tail feathers, Clyde is distinctively colorful from his comb to his feet. Kids will giggle at Clyde’s increasingly complex morning shenanigans even as they sympathize with his plight. When Clyde finally reveals his magnificent crow, readers will cheer.

A Crow of His Own is a winner on so many levels. It offers parents and children a way to discuss and begin building the strong sense of self so important to a happy and successful life. The book also presents a positive visual representation of diversity, and in Roberta and Farmer Jay and Farmer Kevin it shows that finding support helps. And it does all of this in a story that stands on its own as a funny, laugh-inducing romp. Because kids will want to hear this story over and over, A Crow of His Own would be a wonderful addition to libraries and home book collections.

Ages 4 – 9

Charlesbridge, 2015 | ISBN 978-1580894470

To learn more about Megan Dowd Lambert, her picture books, her Whole Book Approach to Reading, and more visit her website!

On David Hyde Costellos website you’ll find a gallery of artwork, a portfolio of picture books, videos, and more!

Upsy-Daisy Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-chicken-craft

A Chicken to Wake Up To

 

A long-handled wooden turner makes a plucky decoration for your room or kitchen—and a great reminder to bring your passions to every job! In a few simple steps, you’ll have a cute companion you’ll want to crow about!

Supplies

  • Printable Comb and Scarf Template
  • Long-handled wooded turner, available in kitchen supply stores
  • Red felt, 2 inches by 2 inches
  • Yellow bakable clay
  • Fabric, 12 inches square
  • A small piece of white felt or fleece (optional)
  • White paint (or any color you would like)
  • Black marker
  • Fabric glue
  • Glue gun
  • Paint brush

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-chicken-craft

Directions

  1. Paint the wooden turner, let dry
  2. Cut the scarf from the piece of fabric
  3. Make a beak from the yellow clay and bake it according to package directions

To make the comb

  1. Fold the felt in half and glue the end together with the fabric glue
  2. Cut short strips from the folded top of the felt, about ½-inch to ¾ -inch in length
  3. Round the corners of the strips slightly

To make the scarf

  1. Fold the fabric in half
  2. With the long, straight edge of the scarf template along the fold, cut out the scarf
  3. With the fabric glue, glue the two sides of the scarf together so that you have two “right” sides
  4. Let dry

To assemble the chicken

  1. Pinch the bottom of the comb together so that the strips open and the felt pleats a little
  2. With the glue gun attach the comb to the back of the painted turner, keeping the bottom pinched together
  3. Attach the beak to the front of the turner
  4. Draw eyes on the chicken with the black marker
  5. Tie the scarf around the neck of the handle, hold in place with a drop of glue in the back if necessary
  6. To make tail feathers in a turner with a hole in the handle, pinch together a small folded piece of white felt or fleece and push it through the hole in the handle of the turner.
  7. Cut or arrange to look like feathers

Picture Book Review