July 7 – National Father Daughter Takes a Walk Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was established to promote the bonding of dads and daughters through the simple act of taking a walk together and sharing observations and conversation. By getting away from the distractions of work, chores, and electronics, fathers and their daughters can learn more about each other and make memories that last a lifetime. To celebrate today, plan a walk with your daughter or granddaughter!

Ask Me

Written by Bernard Waber | Illustrated by Suzy Lee

Even before Dad has finished tying his shoes, his daughter has leaped from the front steps, eager to walk. As the pair stroll through the park, the little girl twirls in front of her dad and says, “Ask me what I like.” Dad obliges, and his daughter presents him with a list that includes dogs, cats, turtles, and geese. “Geese in the sky or geese in the water?” Dad asks as they pass a pond that’s alive with a smattering of both. The girl decisively answers “Geese in the sky.” But then she has a change of heart for those floating peacefully in the pond, and finally settles on “both.”

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Image copyright Suzy Lee, 2015, text copyright Bernard Waber, 2015. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

The little girl likes this game and asks for more. She reveals she likes frogs and bugs and flowers. She also likes horses… well, “riding horses.” Her dad is surprised to learn that she’s ridden a horse. “You remember,” she says, reminding him of the horse she rode on the merry-go-round. “I remember,” her dad says. As they pass an ice cream truck, the little girl tells her dad to ask if she likes ice cream cones, and when he does, she says “No. I love love love ice cream cones.” With strawberry ice cream cones in hand and the little girl riding on her father’s shoulders, they keep walking and talking.

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Image copyright Suzy Lee, 2015, text copyright Bernard Waber, 2015. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

It turns out the girl loves digging in the sand, collecting sea shells, and starfish. As they enter a forest of maple trees decked out for autumn and with a red balloon in tow, the little girl answers “some more likes.” She likes the color red, “splishing, splashing, and splooshing” in the rain, and making up words. Next, she wants to hear a “how come” as in “How come birds build nests?” But the little girl doesn’t want to answer this one, she wants to hear her dad’s explanation even though she already knows what he’s going to say. She just likes hearing him tell it.

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Image copyright Suzy Lee, 2015, text copyright Bernard Waber, 2015. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Back on their front steps, the little girl tells her dad to ask one more “I like.” She likes next Thursday, she says at last and prompts her dad, “Do you know why I like next Thursday?” Her dad plays along, pretending not to know. Next Thursday, she happily reminds him, is her birthday—and she likes balloons, hats, and a cake. Dad assures his daughter he won’t forget. Then it’s time for the little girl to go to sleep. With her favorite stuffed toys and one more “I like”—a second kiss goodnight, the girl drifts off to sleep.

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Image copyright Suzy Lee, 2015, text copyright Bernard Waber, 2015. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Bernard Waber perfectly captures the rapid-fire banter of children while making this father-daughter outing joyfully unhurried and carefree. The father’s simple responses and gentle prompts that echo his daughter’s tone and enthusiasm demonstrate the strong trust and understanding between the two and offer a terrific model for adult readers. Children will love hearing the back-and-forth conversation between father and daughter that affirms their own curiosity and favorites. The sweet final request and answer are heartwarming and reassuring.

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Suzy Lee’s vibrant settings spotlight the line-drawn figures, giving the story a wonderful mixture of whimsy and reality with a lighthearted sense of movement. Just looking at the pages, readers can imagine the sounds of conversation, geese honking, bugs humming, the ice cream truck chiming, and the rustle of leaves as the little girl and her dad slush through the woods. Each image also, however, draws readers in with a peaceful, comforting feeling where all intrusions fall away and the focus is on the love between adult and child.

Ask Me is a heartfelt book for parents, grandparents, and other caregivers to share with the children in their life. The book would make an often-asked-for addition to home bookshelves for sweet and fun story times (that may lead to outside excursions) and a terrific classroom book to jumpstart short writing or drawing prompts, outdoor jaunts, or conversations.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2015 | ISBN 978-0547733944

Discover more about Bernard Waber, his books, and his art on his website

To learn more about Suzy Lee, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Father Daughter Take a Walk Day Activity

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I Like Walking Journal Page

Print this I Like Walking Journal Page, find a walking buddy, and head out! When you see something you like or that makes you excited, add it to your list!

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You can find Ask Me at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

BookshopIndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 22 – National Goof Off Day Book Tour Stop for Cow Says Meow

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About the Holiday

Have things gotten a little too serious? Do you just feel like letting go and being silly? Then today’s the day to do it! Established in 1976 by Monica Moeller Dufour of Davidson, Michigan, encourages people to relax and let go of all the stresses.Having fun once in awhile can put you in a better frame of mind and give you new perspectives. So tell your best (or worst) jokes, watch a comedy, or read some funny books. Now that you have permission to goof off and a whole twenty-four hours to do it in, plan some wacky fun. There are no rules—so enjoy!

Thanks to Kirsti Call and HMH Books for Young Readers for sharing a digital copy of Cow Says Meow with me for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own. I’m thrilled to be partnering with HMH Books in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Cow Says Meow

Written by Kirsti Call | Illustrated by Brandon James Scott

 

We all know what each animal sounds like, right? But what if the animals themselves forgot or got confused? Well, it might sound a lot like Kirsti Call’s giggle fest, Cow Says Meow. To start off the fun, a little boy peeks up from the bottom of the first page at a cow that already looks a little perplexed as the narrator announces, “Cow says…” Hey! I know this one! readers will think, but when they turn the page, the cow lets out a vigorous “MEOW.”

The boy has something to say about that—as well as a clever sense of humor. He tells the cow “What a copycat!” With this pun, a cat—looking as if someone has just stepped on its tail—pops up. What does this cat say? Well, here’s a hint: the boy thinks “the cat sounds hoarse!” By now kids will be laughing and begging to turn the page to hear what the horse has to say for itself.

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Image copyright Brandon James Scott, 2021, text copyright Kirsti Call, 2021. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Each page introduces kids to another befuddled animal and a funny pun to go with their mixed-up language. At last the boy meets a pig who greets him with a friendly “HI!” But “pigs don’t say ‘hello’!” the boy marvels. And here’s a new kid to set the record straight. But what does she say? Let’s just say the boy thinks “this story was an udder disaster.” Maybe it’s time to start over… after all, the cow’s back asking, “Can I say MEOW again?”

The hilarity of Kirsti Call and Brandon James Scott’s book doesn’t begin and end with just the story. Round cutouts on the front and back covers allow kids to look at the world through the eyes of the cow and the cat and have fun saying whatever animal (or other) sounds they want.

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Image copyright Brandon James Scott, 2021, text copyright Kirsti Call, 2021. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Kirsti Call’s funny, feel-good book is pure escapism into that kid realm of in-the-moment goofiness and laughter that’s so refreshing. Cow Says Meow offers multitudes of rereading opportunities as children will want to match their own mixed-up sounds to each animal and young wordsmiths may want to try out their brainpower by coming up with new puns and jokes.

Brandon James Scott’s big-eyed, bemused animals, shown in comical close-up portraits as they prepare to speak on one page and then full bodied on the next as they do, are the perfect foils for Call’s story. Their vibrant, textured images and slightly crossed eyes enhance both the mystery and the humor of this cleverly conceived book. All dialogue is delivered in speech bubbles, which will thrill new and emergent readers who want to join in. The cut-out eyes in the covers are genius, creating a whole package of storytelling and playtime in one.

If you’re looking for a book that will elicit laughs every time you share it, one that makes a terrific take along, and would be a much-loved gift, Cow Says Meow is it. The book is a must for goofy, just plain fun story times at home, in the classroom, and for public libraries.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2021 | ISBN 978-0358423348

Discover more about Kirsti Call and her books on her website.

To learn more about Brandon James Scott, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Sing along with Kirsti Call and this Cow Says Meow song!

National Goof Off Day Activity

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Silly Balloons

 

You can have lots of silly fun with balloons! Try some of these ideas—they’re sure to make you laugh!

Goofy Faces

Blow up a balloon and draw a funny face on it. Rub the balloon on your shirt or a blanket and stick it to the wall, your shirt, or even your mom or dad!

Crazy Hair

Rub a blown-up balloon on your shirt or a blanket (fleece works well) then hold it near your hair and watch it go a little crazy!

Bend Water

This bit of balloon magic will amaze you! Rub a blown-up balloon on a blanket (fleece works well). Turn on a faucet to a thin stream of water. Hold the balloon near the stream of water and watch it bend toward the balloon. 

Volleyballoon

This is a fun game for two or more people played like volleyball—but with balloons! All you need is a balloon and a line on the floor. Players form teams and bat the balloon back and forth over the line, keeping it in the air.as long as possible. A team wins a point when the opposing team can’t return the balloon.

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You can find Cow Says Meow at these booksellers 

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

March 9 – Unique Names Day

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About the Holiday

Unique Names Day was established in 1997 by Jerry Hill, a hobbyist in onomatology – the study of the etymology, history, and use of proper names – as part of Celebrate Your Name Week. The holiday celebrates uncommon or uncommonly spelled names and encourages those with unique names to always take pride in their name. One way to enjoy the day is to find out more about your name and how or why your parents chose it. You can have fun with names every day this week. Upcoming are Discover What Your Name Means Day, Nametag Day, Middle Name Pride Day, and Descendent’s Day. You can learn more about each daily holiday at Names Universe.

My Name is Wakawakaloch!

Written by Chana Stiefel | Pictures by Mary Sullivan

 

Wakawakaloch had a problem. Well, it wasn’t really her problem; none of the kids at school could pronounce or even remember her name. After another day in which her name was mangled (Oog called her “‘Walawala,’” Boog shouted “‘Look out, Wammabammaslamma!’” and Goog cheered her on during Club Club with “‘Swing, Lokamokatok!’”), Wakawakaloch was as angry as an erupting volcano.

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Image copyright Mary Sullivan, 2019, text copyright Chana Stiefel, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

When her parents asked what was wrong, Wakawakaloch said she wanted to change her name to Gloop. Pa thought Gloop was a good name, but reminded his daughter that her name had been “‘in family many, many moons.’” But Wakawakaloch was inconsolable. Not only could no one say her name right, but she never found it on any T-shirts. Ma and Pa thought there was only one thing to do—take her to see Elder Mooch.

Despite his leathery skin and aroma of “rotting mammoth poop,” Elder Mooch was an insightful Neanderthal. He started off with an ill-considered joke that set Wakawakaloch reaching for tissues from the nearby dispenser rock. But she poured out her heart and the fact that she wanted an easy name, one found on T-shirts. She could just imagine all of the heroic and adventurous things she could do with a name and T-shirt like that.

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Image copyright Mary Sullivan, 2019, text copyright Chana Stiefel, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Elder Mooch looked at her and then bestowed his wisdom. He told her she was a “‘forward thinker’” but “‘must be a backward seer too.’” This bit of knowledge cost her two pigeons and left her smoldering. What did he mean by that? Later that night as she tossed and turned in bed, she caught a glimpse of the paintings on her wall. They showed her great-great-great-great-great grandmother Wakawakaloch “performing brave and heroic acts…. Little Wakawakaloch placed her hand on the ancient handprint of her mighty namesake. It was a perfect match.”

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Image copyright Mary Sullivan, 2019, text copyright Chana Stiefel, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

In the morning, Wakawakaloch was smiling. She no longer wanted to be called Gloop, and she told her parents that she was ready to help others. When the Roll-the-Boulder tournament came round, Wakawakaloch had her personalized T-shirt stand all set. Oog, Boog, and Goog thought her shirts for Chana, Sioban, Xavier, Eoghan were “‘Ooga booga’ (way cool).” Wakawakaloch had even made one for herself. Elder Mooch wanted to buy three, and when little Hoopaloopie came by, Wakawakaloch got to work on another shirt.

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Image copyright Mary Sullivan, 2019, text copyright Chana Stiefel, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

For all those kids who never find their names on shirts, mugs, necklaces, keychains, or other personalized items and who frequently hear the question, “How do you pronounce that?,” Chana Stiefel’s book is for you! This fresh tale will also resonate with any child who feels different for any reason. Wakawakaloch, with her strong personality, thoughtful introspection, and creative solution, is a character that readers will love and want to emulate. Stiefel deftly navigates this sensitive landscape with a combination of honest feelings and hilarious mispronunciations, prehistorical details, and descriptions. Readers will laugh all the way through but will also be absorbing the lesson that everyone should embrace their own “mighty” personality and be celebrated and recognized for their unique qualities.

In her vibrant illustrations, Mary Sullivan creates a comically anachronistic ancient world, where safety cones made of stone mark the playground, a stone telescope is aimed out the window, mail is delivered (this part may be accurate, I’d have to check), and cupcakes are eaten with forks. Kids will want to linger over each page to point out all of the funny elements that add depth and glee to this story. Wakawakaloch shows the feelings bubbling up inside her with furrowed brows, livid gestures, and ready tears, while the other kids cluelessly continue to distort her name even after being told the right pronunciation multiple times. Wakawakaloch’s visit to Elder Mooch is a funny take on therapy sessions, but his advice leads to a welcome image of contemplation and realization that makes Wakawakaloch appreciate her family history and also want to contribute to its—and society’s—advancement. Wakawakaloch’s T-shirt booth is sure to inspire kids to make their own shirt too.

A delightfully inventive story with many applications and prompts for further discussion as well as activities celebrating individuality, My Name is Wakawakaloch! will be a much-asked-for favorite on home, classroom, and public library shelves.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2019 | ISBN 978-1328732095

Discover more about Chana Stiefel and her books on her website.

To learn more about Mary Sullivan, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Check out the My Name is Wakawakaloch! “ooga booga” book trailer!

Unique Names Day Activity

CPB - Name Jars standing

Love Your Name Organizer Jar

 

Everyone needs a place to store their special stuff! Here’s a way to recycle a plastic jar and make a cool organizer jar with your name on it. This organizer jar also makes a great gift for your friends!

Supplies

  • A large plastic jar, such as a peanut butter jar or mayonnaise jar, cleaned out and with the label removed
  • Acrylic multi-surface paint or markers
  • Chalkboard paint
  • Paint brush
  • Chalk

CPB - Name Jars on sides

Directions

  1. Paint a rectangle on the front of the jar with chalkboard paint
  2. Decorate the rest of the jar with paint, markers, or paper just the way you want! My green jar sports a friendly dinosaur!

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You can find My Name is Wakawakaloch! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

November 26 – Thanksgiving Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday is one of the first celebrated in America and dates back to 1621, when the pilgrims commemorated a year of survival in their new homeland. Typically a day when families gather with loved ones from around the country, this year’s holiday may be smaller for many, but no less meaningful. Today’s book can help readers find things to be thankful for today and ever day.

The Thank You Book

Written by Mary Lyn Ray | Illustrated by Stephanie Graegin

 

Saying “thank you” is good manners, of course, but “it’s also for when something wakes a little hum—a happy little hum—inside you and you want to answer back.” Each day begins with a thank you for the sunrise and for breakfast too. Outside, there’s a whole world of wonders to be thankful for, places to play, and crafts to make.

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Image copyright Stephanie Graegin, 2018, text copyright Mary Lyn Ray. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

“Thank you is for laps and books…. It’s also for when hurt or sad or not-so-good gets better.” Thank you is for the things that keep us warm and for holidays full of surprises. We give thanks for home and family as well as “for this earth we ride on, and for the stars beyond.” We’re thankful for the simple joys of bedtime—PJs, stories, and goodnight kisses.

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Image copyright Stephanie Graegin, 2018, text copyright Mary Lyn Ray. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Thank you is for all the things we know and for those we don’t. It’s for what makes each one of us “glad that we are us.” And for everything both big and small, “we wrap a hug around each day—to say another thank you.”

Mary Lyn Ray’s tribute to the moments, things, and interactions that bring happiness to life is a thoughtful and joyful reminder of all the gifts we share with others. Her lyrical text takes a child’s view of the things both big and small that they can count on to fill a year with wonder.

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Image copyright Stephanie Graegin, 2018, text copyright Mary Lyn Ray. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Stephanie Graegin populates this world with adorable animals and enthusiastic kids going about their days together at home and with their friends, enjoying celebrations and quiet times, waking up in the morning and going to sleep at night. Each charming image holds the comfort and delight of sharing our lives with others.

The Thank You Book is a gem that highlights companionship, friendship, and the wide range of relationships and things we have to give thanks for every day. It is an enchanting book to add to home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2018 | ISBN 978-0544791367 (Hardcover) | ISBN 978-0358362685 (Board Book, 2020)

Discover more about Mary Lyn Ray and her books on her website.

To learn about Stephanie Graegin, her books, and her art on her website.

Thanksgiving Day Activity

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What Are You Thankful For? Poster

 

Write all of the amazing things in your life that make you happy on this colorful, printable What Are You Thankful For? Template! Then display it in your room to make you smile or remind you to thank everyone who is important to you! 

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You can find The Thank You Book at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

 

Picture Book Review

October 26 – Howl at the Moon Day

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About the Holiday

Wolves, with their gleaming eyes, sharp teeth, and eerie resonating howl, evoke strong emotions in many people. Playing the role of both hero and villain in mythological tales, feared by farmers and ranchers, and well known as “big and bad” to children everywhere, wolves are part of our lives whether we’ve ever seen or heard one or not. While many people may have a negative view of wolves, the founders of today’s holiday want to change that. They want people to see the beauty, power, and environmental benefits of these majestic animals. Wolves don’t actually howl at the moon; they howl to communicate with the rest of their pack, but the inspirational nature of an image of the full moon framing the upturned head of a wolf cannot be denied. To celebrate today? Sure! Go out and howl your loudest at the moon!

There’s Something about Sam

Written by Hannah Barnaby | Illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf

 

Max was inviting all the boys in his class to his sleepover birthday party. All except the new kid Sam, that is. “‘There’s something different about him,’” Max told his mom, but she said “‘I’m sure you’ll like him when you get to know him better,’” so Max wrote out the invitation. At school all the boys were excited to go. All except Sam, that is. He wasn’t sure because there was going to be “a full moon that night.”

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Image copyright Anne Wilsdorf, 2020, text copyright Hanna Barnaby, 2020. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

The other boys thought Sam’s abilities to run really fast and know what the cafeteria would be serving for lunch were awesome. Still, Sam wanted to know what made him seem so different, and he was determined to figure it out at his party. At dinner, Max was mesmerized by Sam’s very rare burger. While they played games, Max thought it was amusing when Sam took a nip at Jeremy, and while all the other boys changed into their pajamas in the family room, Sam did it privately.

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Image copyright Anne Wilsdorf, 2020, text copyright Hanna Barnaby, 2020. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

When Max’s mom brought out cookies, all the boys grabbed for them. That’s when Max noticed Sam’s hairy hands and long, sharp claws. The other kids screamed and hid, but Max thought it was cool. Sam was just about to explain, when “the room was flooded with moonlight.” Sam ran out of the house, growling, with Max right behind him. The boys had wild fun in the backyard all night…until they fell asleep up in a big tree.

As Max and his mom watched the boys head home, Max’s mom had to agree that Sam was “an unusual boy.” “‘Yep,’ Max said, ‘he sure is something.’” Then he ran to his room to schedule monthly sleepovers with Sam.

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Image copyright Anne Wilsdorf, 2020, text copyright Hanna Barnaby, 2020. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Hannah Barnaby’s unique tale of friendship and individuality will enchant rambunctious kids for whom the lure of all things wild is irresistible. Quickly paced, Barnaby’s story will entice readers to guess at Sam’s alternate personality and watch eagerly for his transformation. Along the way Barnaby tucks in plenty of traits—from athletic ability to liking the same things to just sharing unstructured play time—that draw friends together and reminds readers to give everyone a chance to show their true selves before making judgements.

Anne Wilsdorf’s delightfully freewheeling boys will charm kids from the first page. When readers first meet Sam, with his scruffy hair, they may begin to get an inkling of just how he is so different. Other hints add to the fun too. Details like monster backpacks, monster-themed toys, pajamas and sleeping bags, and a scary movie on TV leave it up to readers to decide whether Sam is really a werewolf or not.

Simply lots of fun with a welcome message, There’s Something about Sam will be an often-asked for addition to bedtime story times—full moon or not. The book would be  an enchanting addition to home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 7

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2020 | ISBN 978-1328766809

Discover more about Hannah Barnaby and her books on her website.

Howl at the Moon Day Activity

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Werewolf Coloring Page

 

You can have a howling good time with this printable coloring page, and you don’t even need to wait for the full moon!

Werewolf Coloring Page

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You can find There’s Something about Sam at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

August 14 – It’s National Crayon Collection Month

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About the Holiday

Kids love going to restaurants that provide a fun placemat and crayons to color with while they wait. But what happens to those crayons when the meal is over? Most times they’re thrown in the trash with the napkins and straws and other items left behind. Wouldn’t it be great if those gently used crayons could go on to be used by other kids at schools that can’t afford such supplies? They can! Begun by Crayon Collection, National Crayon Collection Month encourages restaurants, hotels, and other organizations that provide free crayons to collect the ones left behind and donate them to under-serviced schools. As school arts programs are threatened with budget cuts, these important supplies can make a big difference in the lives of students. The ability of children to express their creativity is a crucial part of their education and growth.  You can get involved too! To learn how you can make an impact, visit CrayonCollection.org. Or look into donating crayons (and other supplies) to a school in your area.

The Crayon Man: The True Story of the Invention of Crayola Crayons

Written by Natascha Biebow | Illustrated by Steven Salerno

Edwin Binney was an inventor who truly appreciated all the colors around him. In fact, “color made him really, really HAPPY!” Perhaps he loved color so much because all day long in the mill where he worked he was surrounded by nothing but black: “black dust, black tar, black smoke, black ink, black dye, black shoe polish. His company sold carbon black, a new kind of pigment, or colored substance, make from the soot of burning oil and natural gas.” Edwin worked with his cousin C. Harold Smith, and their company was called Binney and Smith.

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Image copyright Steven Salerno, 2019, text copyright Natascha Biebow, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

While Harold was the salesman, Edwin was the tinkerer who had made better pencils for writing on slate and a wax crayon that wrote on both paper and wood. His wife, Alice, thought he was just the person to create better crayons for kids. The existing crayons were too big and clunky, and artists’ crayons were too expensive.

Edwin gave it some thought and started experimenting with wax for substance and rocks and minerals for color. Then he and his workers fine-tuned their batches, adding only “a pinch of this pigment, a sploosh of that one, a little hotter, a little cooler…and voilà, LOTS of different shades!” Now, instead of being covered in black dust at the end of the day, “Edwin came home covered in color.”

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Image copyright Steven Salerno, 2019, text copyright Natascha Biebow, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

At the factory, Edwin’s team worked on their top-secret formula and finally poured the mixtures into “thin, crayon-shaped molds” to make crayons that were just the right size for children. Finally, in 1903, Edwin had the product he wanted. “He’d invented a new kind of colored crayon” and wanted a new name to go with it. Alice had just the right suggestion, and Crayola crayons were born.

The first boxes contained eight colors and sold for a nickel. As they shipped out to stores, Edwin wondered if the kids would like them. Children loved their fine points, clear lines, and long-lasting color. By this time, inexpensive paper was also available, so kids didn’t have to draw or write on slate tablets anymore.

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Image copyright Steven Salerno, 2019, text copyright Natascha Biebow, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

At the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, Edwin’s Crayola crayons won a gold medal. As time went on, Edwin and his team made even more colors, many inspired by nature and even the flowers in Edwin’s own garden. Some of the colors you’ll find in a box today were given their names by children, including “macaroni and cheese” and “robin’s egg blue.” Now, kids all around the world can create just the picture they want, with lots and lots of color.

Back matter includes an illustrated description of the process of making Crayola crayons, an extended biography of Edwin Binney, and a bibliography of resources.

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Image copyright Steven Salerno, 2019, text copyright Natascha Biebow, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Natascha Biebow’s quickly paced biography of Edwin Binney and the invention of Crayola crayons is a deft portrait of the man and his times that were on the cusp of and central to so many innovations that created the modern world. Biebow’s emphasis on Binney’s willingness to listen and match his inventions to people’s needs is a lesson on collaboration and the true spirit of invention for today’s future pioneers. In her fascinating and accessible text, Biebow relates the problems with late 1800s writing and drawing mediums while also building suspense on how Binney and his team created the new crayons. Children will be awed to discover the thought, experiments, and materials that went into those first thin sticks of color. Short paragraphs that explain more factual information about topics in the story, including carbon black, the availability of paper, European crayons, and pigments are sprinkled throughout the pages.

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Image copyright Steven Salerno, 2019, text copyright Natascha Biebow, 2019. Courtesy of HMH Books for Young Readers.

Steven Salerno’s color-drenched pages are beautiful tributes to the man who brought a new age of color into children’s lives. In a clever page turn, Edwin Binney stands in his garden with his arms outstretched appreciating the rainbow of flowers, the deep-blue sea, the light-blue sky, and a fiery red cardinal flying by. The next page takes kids into Binney’s mill, where he stands in the same position, but now seeming to bemoan the sooty environment. Salerno brings the time period alive for kids through hair and clothing styles and school and home furnishings. Several pages give readers a field trip into Binney’s secret lab to see the mechanics of making crayons at work. The front and end papers invite kids to give the wrapper-less crayons pictured a name based on their colors and then to make a drawing of their own.

A high-interest biography of the man who changed the way kids could interpret their world, The Crayon Man is a must for young inventors, artists, and thinkers as well as for classroom story times, social studies lessons, and art classes. The book would be a welcome addition to home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 6 – 9

HMH Books for Young Readers, 2019 | ISBN 978-1328866844

Discover more about Natascha Biebow and her books on her website.

To learn more about Steven Salerno, his books, and his art, visit his website.

National Coloring Book Day Activity

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Cool Coloring Pages

You know what to do during Crayon Collection Month! Collect some crayons and enjoy these printable coloring pages for you to print and enjoy!

Cave kid Coloring Page | Dragon Coloring Page | Mermaid Coloring Page

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You can find The Crayon Man: The True Story of the Invention of Crayola Crayons at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 13 – National Get Outdoors Day

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About the Holiday

Established in 2008, National Get Outdoors Day was instituted to inspire people – and especially young people – to enjoy healthy, active outdoor fun and exploration. Celebrated in conjunction with national parks, people are encouraged to hike, explore, and enjoy the natural wonders near them. You can also head out into your yard to play games or into your neighborhood with bikes, scooters, skates or just for a walk. There’s so much for kids to see and discover – even concepts that may seem simple are beautiful and complex in the eyes of a child, as you’ll see in today’s book. 

Round

Written by Joyce Sidman | Illustrated by Taeeun Yoo

 

A little girl spies an orange on the ground and bends to pick it up. She sees more—many more—of the brightly colored orbs hanging from a tree and reaches up to touch them. “I love round things,” she says. “I like to feel their smoothness. My hands want to reach around their curves.” The girl continues on her singular scavenger hunt for round things that grow.

She scatters some seeds in a hole and parts tall grasses to peek in on a turtle waiting for her eggs to hatch. On a hillside, a little patch of mushrooms “swell into roundness,” while tiny, plump blueberries beckon on a nearby bush and fill the family’s baskets. On the bike ride home, the girl and her crew pass fields of sunflowers with their dark, mysterious round centers.

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Image copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2017, courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

At the beach the little girl finds seashells in the sand near the tall craggy rocks which some day, whittled by water and wind, will become round when “all the edges wear off.” Back on dry land, the girl watches a dung beetle transport a ball, persistently moving it with its legs, and body motions. The girl stands by, fascinated. She loves “to watch round things move. They are so good at it! Rolling, spinning, bouncing.” She always wonders “where they’re headed.”

An old, old tree, chopped down now, reveals its secret age as the little girl counts the rings in the trunk. She’s excited to discover hidden round things—like the tiny ladybugs and snails concealed beneath green leaves. As the rain splatters a pond, the little girl, safe in her yellow slicker, reveals, “I love how water can be round, gathered in beads of silver…or falling in wet splats leaving circles of ripples behind.”

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Image copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2017, text copyright Joyce Sidman, 2017. Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

The sun sets, turning the sky yellow and orange, while the girl blows transparent bubbles and watches them float toward the clouds. When the sun is gone and the sky is dark, she gazes through a telescope at the twinkling dots of light that “spin together slowly…and last billions of years” while she waits for that one constant celestial body that grows “rounder and rounder, until the whole sky holds its breath.”

The girl shares the beauty of roundness with her friends as they hold hands in a never-ending circle of friendship, and when she is alone she curls up into a cozy ball to read or feels arms around her in a loving hug.

An explanation of why so many things in nature are round—including the shape’s sturdiness, balance, and ability to spread and roll—follows the text.

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Image copyright Taeeun Yoo, 2017, courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Joyce Sidman’s lyrical story of discovery is a perfect introduction for little ones to the wonders of nature. Focusing on a shape that is familiar to children, Sidman takes them on a walk from grove to field to beach where they can find circles in common and surprising places. After coming home, kids discover an even more poignant idea—the circular beauty of love and friendship.

Taeeun Yoo’s delicate illustrations gorgeously depict examples of circles in nature. Bold sunflowers, tiny insects, snowball-white eggs, expanding ripples, and smooth boulders invite readers to notice the shapes and colors of the wild world around them. Children will be enticed to hunt for all the circles on each page as lily pads, fireflies, polka dots, balloons, the sun, and other objects create an exciting journey of exploration. The little girl’s pets—a dog (appropriately spotted) and a duck—add humor and companionship along the way.

Round would be an excellent take-along book for nature hikes, waiting times, or other outdoor activities and could spur at-home scavenger hunts for circles and other shapes. This original concept book is a wonderful introduction to shapes and nature for little ones.

Ages 3 – 7

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017 | ISBN 978-0544387614

Learn more about Joyce Sidman and her books on her website! 

View a gallery of artwork by Taeeun Yoo on her website!

Get Outdoors Day Activity

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Personalized Painted Pail

 

A trip to the beach isn’t complete without a pail to make a sandcastle with or to collect shells, seaweed, sea glass, or other things in. But why should all the cool stuff be on the inside? With this craft you can decorate your pail to show your unique personality!

Supplies

  • Plastic or metal pail
  • Craft paint in various colors
  • Crystal Clear Acrylic Coating, for multi-surface use
  • Paint brush

Directions

  1. Paint designs on the pail
  2. When paint is dry spray with acrylic coating to set paint
  3. Let dry

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You can find Round at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review