November 8 – Cover Reveal of Monsters in the Briny

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Monsters-in-the-Briny-cover

Monsters in the Briny

Written by Lynn Becker | Illustrated by Scott Brundage

 

What do you do with a grumpy kraken, a sickly sea serpent, and a tearful gigantic tortoise? You sing them a tune! Following the sea shanty rhyme of “What Do You Do With . . . ,” a ship’s crew has to contend with a coterie of mythical sea creatures, all demanding comfort and attention. As each creature threatens to swamp the ship, the quick-thinking crew knows just what to do to save the day, from serving pancakes to mopping a sweaty forehead. But what happens when the sailors have had enough?

Back matter includes information about the sea creatures featured, music and lyrics, and a brief history of sea shanties.

I’m thrilled to be talking with author Lynn Becker and illustrator Scott Brundage about their rollicking sea-going adventure – a story and sea shanty that you can read or sing with your kids! 

Meet Lynn Becker

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-lynn-becker-headshotLynn Becker has been a reader and creator all her life. These days, when she’s not writing picture books or children’s book reviews, she’s hiking, doing crazy-long yoga classes, and dreaming up even more picture books. After growing up in New York, Lynn spent many years in the Southern California desert with her husband, children, cats, dog, and lots and lots of chickens. She now lives in Colorado. The chickens stayed behind, but a few mythical beasties may have followed her to her new home…! You can connect with Lynn on Her Website | Facebook | Twitter .

Hi Lynn! Thanks for dropping by to talk about your first picture book. I’m so excited to be sharing the first look readers have of this fun book! I’m sure everyone is intrigued to learn how your book came to be, so let’s get started!

You grew up in New York City but have spent many years in the South California desert and Colorado. Did a longing for the sea inspire your unique story?

Kathy, thank you so much for hosting this Monsters in the Briny cover reveal!

I’ve actually been in and around both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans quite a bit, and have always done lots of swimming. But my inspiration for this book absolutely came from my love of monsters. I’m drawn to mythological beings of all kinds, and always have been, maybe because thinking about them adds a dollop of fun and magic to real life. I grew up drowning myself in fantasy and fairy tales, folklore and mythology. My favorite stories tend to feature dragons. (Although I’m a sucker for vampire stories, and who doesn’t enjoy a good, witchy cackle now and then?!)

I knew I had to feature sea monsters in a picture book because, while writing a longer work (a bestiary/poetry collection), I decided to include a sea shanty. What else could I do but spotlight a kraken? And when my critique partners all demanded that this kraken star in a story of her own, Monsters in the Briny took off from there!

The sneak peek of your book is so enticing and really promises a madcap romp to come. How much fun was it to choose the sea creatures and match them with a problem? Can you take readers on the book’s journey?

Once I had my sea shanty format and my kraken, the song practically wrote itself. I used a famous tune that everyone should be familiar with (sorry in advance for any ear worms) and reworked it with my own rollicking, monster-and-kid-friendly scenario. Originally, the story was just about the kraken experiencing a variety of moods, but I got some terrific advice to try pairing each “crisis” with a different sea beast, and I think the story is much stronger for it.

It must have been so thrilling to see your story come to life through Scott Brundage’s illustrations and especially this awesome cover. Can you share your first reaction to seeing the final cover and the interior artwork?

You can’t possibly imagine how happy I was to see this art. I was in the supermarket when I first looked at the cover on my phone, and I cried, right there by the dairy case. It was so very perfect! But I had known from the moment I saw Scott’s website that he was the right person to illustrate this book. My editor, Barb McNally, and the entire team at Sleeping Bear Press (shout out to Hailey in Publicity!) has been a dream to work with, and I couldn’t be happier with the support and know-how they’ve brought to these Monsters. And I’m grateful to my wonderful agent, Lori Steel at Raven Quill Literary, for finding Kraken and Co. such a wonderful home.

You’ve previously worked in animation for films and TV, and Monsters in the Briny is your debut picture book. Do you find that your work in animation influences your writing for kids? What made you want to write for children?

For me, the best picture books are a perfect pairing of words and art. I’ve been enjoying—and studying—them for quite a while now, and for a long time I thought I might also illustrate my own work. Because I previously worked on films, my book dummies often felt like animation storyboards. However, I found that when I wrote a manuscript with no intention of illustrating it, my writing became a lot more interesting. In part because I’m not limited anymore to what I think I can draw! More importantly, without the images to rely on, the writing had to do a lot more heavy lifting. And, since this was about the time I realized I enjoyed the writing part more than the illustrating, this scenario worked out really well.

What are you most looking forward to when the book launches in March? Do you have any book events scheduled that you’d like to tell readers about?

The book launches on April 15 now and I can’t wait to share it with kids! I hope they get as big a kick out of it as I got while writing it. When it publishes, I have a number of blog posts and giveaways lined up. There will also be a book launch scheduled for around that time, and readers can check my website for information on these and other book-related events. I’ll be posting a musical track for the Monsters song, an animated book trailer, and other fun extras on my website

Meet Scott Brundage

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-the-first-men-who-went-to-the-moon-scott-brindage-head-shotScott Brundage is a Brooklyn-based illustrator and character designer. As a child, his parents rightly decided he was far too indoorsy for his own heath and encouraged him to try various hobbies. When T-ball’s rules confused him and judo required too much coordination, he found his love for drawing cartoons at a local art class. Scott has sketched and painted ever since, eventually attending the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. His children’s books include Where’s My Cow? and The First Men Who Went to the Moon. His work has been recognized by American Illustration, the Society of Illustrators of Los Angeles, and the Society of Illustrators. You can connect with Scott on His Website | Instagram | Twitter.

Hi Scott! Welcome back to Celebrate Picture Books! As soon as I learned that you illustrated Monsters in the Briny, I knew kids and adults are in for a special treat, and this cover is just the start as it really sparks the imagination!

Can you share what you loved about Lynn’s story from an illustrator’s point of view?

Well, I was sold at “Monsters.”  The Briny part was gravy after that. I’d jump at any opportunity to take a monster and twist it to fit a children’s audience. This book is just that, a fun twist on a sea shanty about the creepy things in the ocean. I think the cover makes a nice lure to get kids’ minds thinking of what could possibly be lurking deep in the ocean, and the book’s contents shows them just that, but also reassures them that they mostly just want some snacks or a haircut.

How many different versions of the cover did you design before the final one was chosen? I love how realistic the ocean looks in this illustration! Can you share your process in creating the cover and interior images? 

We had the rough idea of what the cover could be pretty early. The bare bones of illustrated text as old, submerged lumber from a boat, interacting with giant tentacles below a tiny ship. When I originally painted the final art, I had just come off several weeks of 16-hour days working on an animated movie. I gave myself one exhausted day to get it done and, unsurprisingly, I was given notes to revise it quite a bit. Sleeping Bear Press found a couple more weeks for me to work on it, which allowed me to rest a bit and give it it’s proper care. I’m glad too, I’m super happy with the final product, even though I was a shell of myself when I started it.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monsters-in-the-briny-cover-reveal-early-cover-sketched

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2021. Courtesy of Scott Brundage and Sleeping Bear Press.

 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monsters-in-the-briny-cover-reveal-early-cover-with-ship-planks

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2021. Courtesy of Scott Brundage and Sleeping Bear Press.

I had the interior sketches finished pretty early on, but my first pass had all the sailors as adults, since I was diving headlong into full on pirates. My art director suggested, very wisely, that they all be children, with a running musical gag involving an accordion player. Oh, right! This is for children. This is why art directors are great!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monsters-in-the-briny-cover-reveal-Kraken-with-adult-pirates

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2021. Courtesy of Scott Brundage and Sleeping Bear Press.

 

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monsters-in-the-briny-cover-reveal-Kraken-with-kids

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2021. Courtesy of Scott Brundage and Sleeping Bear Press.

The way I normally work is to pitch a very rough idea of what the pages could be. Once that’s approved, I develop the sketches a bit more and send for approval. After any revisions or notes to the sketch, I develop a more finished drawing and print the clean drawing on watercolor paper, then paint it. Final touches in photoshop after that.

Did you need to do any kind of research before drawing the sea creatures? How or where did you do this? Did you discover anything surprising along the way?

I needed a bunch of research for the sea creatures, which was pretty easy to find. I wasn’t aiming to make anything super accurate in terms of specific types of animals, more a fun design that would work for the story. It was easy enough to grab a bunch of photos of snakes or turtles or old illustrations of hydras, then put my spin on how they could look.

The much more difficult part was researching the ship itself. I know very little about nautical anything, much less historical pirate ship shapes, types, how the rigging and sails work, etc. Luckily, another illustrator friend of mine, Gregory Manchess, had done a series of murals for National Geographic specifically about historically accurate pirates. He was kind enough to send me piles of ship reference, as well as pirate clothing reference.

So, what I discovered along the way is that those ships are waaaaaay more complex than I had previously guessed. Most of the finished pages would have been intricate webs of ropes and knots had I tried to be super accurate. So, instead… we have a ship that hopefully feels relatively similar throughout, but with a lot of liberties taken.

Did you have a favorite sea monster and/or scene to create? What made it your favorite? Can you give readers a little preview of one of the sea monsters?

I have a couple favorites, but the kraken is probably at the top. Tentacles are always fun to draw, they can feel long, elegant, and powerful in their gesture and shape, but also have those inherently upsetting but also sorta silly suction cups. And playing with the giant squid’s scale in relation to the ship adds fun aspect to designing the illustrations. The tentacles can literally hug the ship and highlight whatever I want to call attention to. There’s not much more an illustrator could ask for. Plus, it’s a ridiculous bright red, who isn’t a fan of that?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-monsters-in-the-briny-cover-reveal-kraken-with-pancakes

Image copyright Scott Brundage, 2021. Courtesy of Scott Brundage and Sleeping Bear Press.

What would you like for kids to take away from your illustrations for Monsters in the Briny?

Well, for one, I hope the song gets stuck in their head. But that aside, I hope kids realize that giant sea monsters are fun and usually just need some music and a pancake to be your friend.

Sea monsters, an unforgettable sea shanty, and pancakes! I can’t wait to read the whole story – and I’m sure readers are hooked too! Thanks, Lynn and Scott, for stopping by to give us a preview of your treasure to come!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-Monsters-in-the-Briny-cover

Monsters in the Briny will be published this coming spring. Preorder your copy now from these booksellers!

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | The Wandering Jellyfish

Picture Book Review

April 12 – D.E.A.R (Drop Everything And Read) Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-cover

About the Holiday

National D.E.A.R. Day is celebrated every year on April 12th in commemoration of Beverly Cleary’s birthday. D.E.A.R. stands for Drop Everything And Read and encourages families to set aside at least thirty minutes to enjoy reading together. Beverly Cleary, who recently passed away at the age of 104, gave the world such unforgettable characters as Ramona and Beezus Quimby, Henry Huggins and his dog Ribsy, and the motorcycle-riding mouse, Ralph S. Mouse. You can learn more about D.E.A.R. Day and find resources and tips for reading with children on the Reading Rockets website.

Thanks to Lerner Books for sending me a copy of Pirates vs. Monsters for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Pirates vs. Monsters

Written by David Crosby | Illustrated by Lee Cosgrove

 

“Three pirates met up at the old Parrot’s Head, / to brag about monsters they’d each left for dead.” Over a few mugs of frothy grog, while the fog rolled in over the pier, Hector took the stage first. His gold teeth glinted in the light as regaled the others with his tale of besting the Hockler, who could “spit globs of poison straight into your eye.” While the pirates were enjoying deep belly laughs over Hector’s adventure, an eerie ship pulled into port.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-restaurant

Image copyright Lee Cosgrove, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts/Lerner.

Next up was Pirate Sue. She climbed atop a barrel and told a hair-curling story of defeating the Crunk, “‘…a two-headed beast” who’s heads took turns feasting and sleeping. The three pirates were laughing so hard that they didn’t see three shrouded shapes leave the spooky ship. Finally, it was George’s turn to tell his story. Holding his peg leg aloft, he began. “‘The Muncher,’ he snarled, / ‘bites pirates on sight. / He ate my left leg but did / not get my right.” To beat him, George tricked the Muncher into swallowing an anchor festooned with sharp points all around by dressing it up like a pirate scarecrow.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-fog

Image copyright Lee Cosgrove, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts/Lerner.

The pirates were rolling on the floor in hysterics when a “BANG!” shook the door. The piano player screamed as in burst the Hockler, the Crunk, and the Muncher. The three pirates ran for their lives from the Parrot’s Head. Hector dove off the pier, Sue took off down the pier, and George leaped through the window.

With grog in their claws, “three monsters met up at the old Parrot’s Head, / to brag about pirates they’d faced and had fled.” But who told the truth and who was a liar while telling brave tales in the glow of the fire?

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-hockler

Image copyright Lee Cosgrove, 2021, text copyright David Crosby, 2021. Courtesy of Maverick Arts/Lerner.

David Crosby’s story of three pirates and three monsters who love bragging about their exploits will have kids guffawing along with Hector, Sue, and George as they crack each other up with their tales of daring do. Crosby’s madcap rhymes are a joy to read aloud, especially using dramatic inflection to wring out all the arg-mosphere and suspense of this surprising story.

Lee Cosgrove’s cozy Parrot’s Head, with its crackling fire; wooden barrel tables; swords, swordfish, and skeleton décor; and scruffy piano player is the perfect pier-side hangout for a jovial tankard of grog. Even the dog wears an eyepatch. Images of the pirates and monsters will have kids giggling, and close examinations of the pages reveal plenty of humorous details like the island map on the wall of the Parrot’s Head that looks suspiciously like the “globs of poison” the Hockler spits, the curly hair sprouting from the skull on Sue’s hat that mirrors her own, and George’s heart-print underwear.

A treasure for kids who love pirates, monsters, and a funny story with an unexpected ending, Pirates vs. Monsters makes a fun go-to book for boisterous story times at home, in the classroom, and for public library collections.

Ages 4 – 9

Maverick Arts Publishing/Lerner, 2021 | ISBN 978-1848867086

You can connect with David Crosby on Twitter.

To learn more about Lee Cosgrove, his books, and his art, visit his website.

D.E.A.R Day Activity

CPB - Bookworm Book (2)

Bookworm Bookmark

 

For all you bookworms out there who love to read, here’s your very own Bookworm Bookmark to color and put between the pages of your favorite story!

Supplies

  • Bookworm Bookmark template
  • Heavy stock paper (optional)
  • Colored pencils or markers
  • Scissors

Directions

  1. Print out the Bookworm Bookmark template
  2. Color the bookworm
  3. Cut out the Bookworm
  4. Cut the Bookworm’s mouth at the dotted line. The top part of the bookworm’s mouth hangs over the page and marks your place!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirates-vs-monsters-cover

You can find Pirates vs. Monsters at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

April 21 – National Kindergarten Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-cover

About the Holiday

National Kindergarten Day honors the birthday of Friedrich Wilhelm August Frobel who was born April 21, 1782 and is credited with starting the very first Kindergarten in Germany in 1837. Recognizing that children learn through play and experience, Frobel established a foundation for modern education. The first kindergarten in America was opened by Margarethe Schurtz in 1856 in Watertown, Wisconsin. Kindergarten became part of some public school systems in 1873. Even though kids aren’t in their regular classes right now, we still celebrate all of their achievements, creativity, and love of fun. Little ones’ enthusiasm and natural empathy can make them great teachers too—as today’s book shows.

Sleeping Bear Press sent me a copy of Kindergarrrten Bus to check out. All opinions are my own.

Kindergarrrten Bus

Written by Mike Ornstein | Illustrated by Kevin M. Barry

 

As the little tykes climb the plank into the kindergarten school bus, they’re met by a most unusual driver. He has a hook hand, a peg leg, a curly beard, a broad-brimmed hat with a parrot perched on the edge, and he greets the first little boy like this: “Ahoy, boy! What? It be ye first day of kindergarrrten? Well, don’t worry, laddie—it be me first day as a bus driverrr!” The pirate shows the kids to their seats and lays down the rules. Any infractions…. Well, Polly will tell ya: “Raaaaa, mutiny!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-plank

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

The kids don’t seem too sure of this turn of events. They each talk about how they miss their family, their pets, their toys, and how it’s all a little scary. But the pirate will have “no blubberin’ on me bus! Pirates don’t get scared! We eat bones for supperrr!” he tells them. And as far as them missing their moms and dads? “We ain’t got time for that fluffy stuff!” he says. So the bus takes off, and the driver sings a ditty about brave these little buccaneers are as they go.

But the route turns as bumpy as a churning sea with potholes that rattle Polly so much she flies out the window…I mean “winderrr.” The pirate wails after his parrot, “Waaaa arrrgh waaaa arrrgh!” Then the bus comes to a screeching halt amid a pirate melt-down. “I can’t drive me bus without me sweet snuggly Polly! I can’t do it, I tells ya! I can’t! I can’t I can’t!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-mutiny

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Everyone piles out, and the kids try to reassure the poor driver, reminding him of all the things he told them. Turns out that ol’ pirate “was only hornswogglin’” and that he considers himself “nothin’ but a scared, blubberin’ boob of a buccaneer.” The kids are empathetic and reassuring, and pretty soon the pirate is feeling better about things.

Back on the bus, the little ditty is less bravado and more true bravery. As they pull up at the X, where “the treasure of all treasures” awaits the kids, the pirate gives one more lesson before letting all those little “scoundrels walk the plank—errr, I mean, exit the bus.” But why is a pirate driving a school bus? one little boy wants to know. Well, that answer may surprise you and it be somethin’ ye just have to see for yourself!

An afterword from the author discussing tips for talking with kids about fears and worries follows the story.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-kids

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Could Mike Ornstein actually be a pirate? I’m thinking yes! His ease with Pirate-ese makes this dialogue-rich story a comical treasure that will have kids “Harrr, harrr, harrr-ing” at every twist and turn in the book—and lucky for them, there’s a whole loot of those. Scrumptious words like “blubberin’, hornswogglin’, landlubbers,” and “blue-footed booby bird” as well as a liberal sprinkling of rrrrs make this book a joyful read-aloud that kids will clamor to participate in. Nuggets of reassurance about “rrrespect,” admitting fears and worries, and enjoying school are pure gold.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-map

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Kevin M. Barry’s wide-eyed, rakish kids and scallywag of a bus driver are the perfect companions on this hilarious journey to the first day of kindergarten. The school bus—a wooden jalopy with porthole windows, a ship’s wheel steering wheel, and a teddy bear jolly roger—comes to a tipping point when the pirate’s beloved Polly flies the coop. As the pirate dramatically looks to the skies and admits his false bravado, the kids—skeptical, astonished, and empathetic—look on. While one curly-haired little girl reassures the pirate, the other kids channel their own bravery and get ready to have a fun day at school. Readers will love the expressive faces, small details (a fish-skeleton belt buckle, a girl’s “I Got This” t-shirt), and, of course, ruffled Polly.

Kindergarrrten Bus is a rip-roarin’ yarn with a heart of gold that will get kids and grown-ups laughing and talking about feelings, fears, and the fact that everyone gets scared sometimes. A go-to book for fun story times and moments when a little more encouragement is needed, Kindergarrrten Bus would be a favorite on home and classroom bookshelves.

Ages 5 – 8

Sleeping Bear Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-1585363988

To learn more about Kevin M. Barry, his books, and his art on his website.

National Kindergarten Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate-maze

Sail for Pirate Treasure Maze

 

Join the crew of scallywags to pick up supplies on your way to finding a treasure chest full of gold in this printable maze.

Sail for Pirate Treasure Maze Puzzle | Sail for Pirate Treasure Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-cover

You can find Kindergarrrten Bus at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

September 19 – National Talk Like a Pirate Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-cover

About the Holiday

Ahoy mateys! Welcome to what may arrrguably be the most fun holiday of the year. You might think that this most treasured of days got its start shipboard on the bounding main, but it actually began in the walled confines of a racquetball court, where a group of guys were doing…well what a group of guys do to encourage each other—toss around pirate phrases. They decided the idea was too good to keep on the court, so they designated September 19th as Talk Like a Pirate Day. They then alerted humorist Dave Barry, who spread word of this day far and wide. Now it’s a favorite of young and old alike. So get out there and do some talkin’ ye scalliwags!

Sleeping Bear Press sent me a copy of Kindergarrrten Bus to check out. All opinions are my own. I’m thrilled to partner with Sleeping Bear Press in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Kindergarrrten Bus

Written by Mike Ornstein | Illustrated by Kevin M. Barry

 

As the little tykes climb the plank into the kindergarten school bus, they’re met by a most unusual driver. He has a hook hand, a peg leg, a curly beard, a broad-brimmed hat with a parrot perched on the edge, and he greets the first little boy like this: “Ahoy, boy! What? It be ye first day of kindergarrrten? Well, don’t worry, laddie—it be me first day as a bus driverrr!” The pirate shows the kids to their seats and lays down the rules. Any infractions…. Well, Polly will tell ya: “Raaaaa, mutiny!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-plank

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

The kids don’t seem too sure of this turn of events. They miss their family, their pets, their toys, and it’s all a little scary. But the pirate will have no “blubberin’ on me bus” because pirates are “rrrough” and tough. “And we ain’t got time for that fluffy stuff!” So the bus takes off, and the driver sings a little ditty as they go.

But the route turns as bumpy as a churning sea with potholes that rattle Polly so much that she flies out the window…I mean “winderrr.” The pirate calls after his parrot, “Waaaa arrrgh waaaa arrrgh!” Then the bus comes to a screeching halt amid a pirate melt-down. “I can’t drive me bus without me sweet snuggly Polly! I can’t do it, I tells ya! I can’t! I can’t I can’t!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-mutiny

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Everyone piles out, and the kids try to reassure the poor driver—and they kind of remind him of all the things he told them. Turns out that ol’ pirate “was only hornswogglin’” and that he considers himself “nothin’ but a scared, blubberin’ boob of a buccaneer.” The kids are empathetic and reassuring, and pretty soon the pirate is feeling better about things.

Back on the bus, the little ditty now has more than a note of encouragement to it. As they pull up at the X where “the treasure of all treasures” awaits the kids, the pirate gives one more lesson before letting all those little “scoundrels walk the plank—errr, I mean, exit the bus.” But why? one little boy wants to know. Why is a pirate driving a school bus? Well, that be somethin’ ye just have to see for yourself!

An afterword from the author discussing tips for talking with kids about fears and worries follows the story.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-kids

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Could Mike Ornstein actually be a pirate? I’m thinking yes! His ease with Pirate-ese makes this dialogue-rich story a comical treasure that will have kids “Harrr, harrr, harrr-ing” at every twist and turn in the book—and lucky for them, there’s a whole loot of those. Scrumptious words like “blubberin’, hornswogglin’, landlubbers,” and “blue-footed booby bird” as well as a liberal sprinkling of rrrrs make this book a joyful read- aloud that kids will clamor to participate in. Nuggets of reassurance about “rrrespect,” admitting fears and worries, and enjoying school are pure gold.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-scared-map

Image copyright Kevin M. Barry, 2018, text copyright Mike Ornstein, 2018. Courtesy of Sleeping Bear Press.

Kevin M. Barry’s wide-eyed, rakish kids and scallywag of a bus driver are the perfect companions on this hilarious journey to the first day of kindergarten. The school bus—a wooden jalopy with porthole windows, a ship’s wheel steering wheel, and a teddy bear jolly roger—comes to a tipping point when the pirate’s beloved Polly flies the coop. As the pirate dramatically looks to the skies and admits his false bravado, the kids—skeptical, astonished, and empathetic—look on. While one curly-haired little girl reassures the pirate, the other kids channel their own bravery and get ready to have a fun day at school. Readers will love the expressive faces, small details (a fish-skeleton belt buckle, a girl’s “I Got This” t-shirt), and, of course, ruffled Polly.

Kindergarrrten Bus is a rip-roarin’ yarn with a heart of gold that will get kids and grown-ups laughing and talking about feelings, fears, and the fact that everyone gets scared sometimes. A go-to book for fun story times and moments when a little more encouragement is needed, Kindergarrrten Bus would be a favorite on home and classroom bookshelves.

Ages 5 – 8

Sleeping Bear Press, 2018 | ISBN 978-1585363988

To learn more about Kevin M. Barry, his books, and his art on his website.

Talk Like a Pirate Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate-maze

Sail for Pirate Treasure Maze

 

Join the crew of scallywags to pick up supplies on your way to finding a treasure chest full of gold in this printable maze.

Sail for Pirate Treasure Maze Puzzle | Sail for Pirate Treasure Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-kindergarrrten-bus-cover

You can find Kindergarrrten Bus at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

May 25 – It’s National Pet Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-cover

About the Holiday

Let’s give a shout-out to our best friends! Who are they? Our pets, of course! Small (or large) and fury (or feathered or scaled or finned), our pets give us unconditional love and loads of happiness. Just watching them navigate their day is entertaining and educational. National Pet Month was established to celebrate these in-home pals and remind pet owners to ensure that their pets have everything they need to live a long and healthy life. This month take extra time to have fun with your pet!

Pirate’s Perfect Pet

Written by Beth Ferry | Illustrated by Matt Myers

 

In the vast ocean teeming with sharks, Captain Crave noticed a small bottle bobbing just off the port side of his ship. With a bound from the plank, he dove into the sea and retrieved it. As he balanced himself on the tip of a shark’s nose and the bottle on the tip of his hook, the captain’s crew cheered and held up scores of 8.6 to 10 for his performance.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-dive

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

Back on deck, Captain Crave uncorked the bottle and unrolled the message. It was a letter from his mum. She had found a “lovely list” in Be Your Best Buccaneer magazine and was sending it on along with a doubloon for his treasure chest. He passed the list on to his first mate, who read aloud: “‘Think you’re the Perfect Pirate Captain? Use our handy checklist to be sure.’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-retrieving-bottle

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

On the list was “Ship?” “‘Check,’ replied the captain.” He could also check off courage and daring, treasure, eye patch, and hook; he was still working on peg leg. But then the first mate got to “pet.” Captain Crave was surprised, but he wanted to be the best buccaneer he could. “‘Well, shuck me an oyster and set sail for land. We needs to find me a pet,’” he said.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-first-mate

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

When they landed on the beach, they were happy to see that “they caused quite a commotion, as good pirates should.” They immediately began searching for a pet. The crab was “‘too cranky,’” the octopus was “‘too clingy,’” and the clam was “‘too quiet.’” They left the beach and headed to a farm, where again they caused a commotion. They checked out a goat, a donkey, and  a goose, but none of them seemed perfect either.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-beach

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

When they entered the zoo, you can imagine the commotion they caused. Here, they tried out an elephant that was “‘too big,’” a koala that was “‘too cuddly,’” and a lion that was just “‘Yikes!’” But the trip wasn’t a total loss. By the end of it, Captain Crave was able to check “peg leg” off the Best Buccaneer list. The zookeeper had an idea on where the pirates could look and drove them straight to the Pet Emporium.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-peg-leg

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

The pirates couldn’t believe how many pets there were to choose from. Captain Crave took a stroll around the shop and then heard a squawk. Just as he gazed upward, he was bombarded by a splat. “‘I’ve been poop-decked,’ he yelled.” His crew were incensed and chased the parrot around the store. They even wondered if they should eat it.

But Captain Crave took a good long look at the parrot, who had landed on his hook. He could see that the parrot was brave, he knew that it had “caused quite a commotion,” and when he asked the parrot, “‘Do ye happen to know—in land, sea, or sky—any pirate-worthy pets?’” The parrot had an answer. Giving up his mum’s shiny doubloon, Captain Crave left the Pet Emporium with the perfect pet on his shoulder.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-pet-emporium

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

Readers will love Beth Ferry’s raucous and riotously funny pirate adventure where the treasure sought isn’t gold or jewels but something more valuable—a beloved pet. Along the way, kids will adore Ferry’s dialogue-rich storytelling that includes plenty of clever “pirate speak” and a brilliant bit on how the Captain attains his desired peg leg. With a nod toward a bird’s talent for target shooting, Ferry taps into her audience’s sense of humor, and as the captain finds his perfect pet, kids will also giggle at the parrot’s puns.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-zoo

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, text copyright, Beth Ferry, 2017. Courtesy of Candlewick Press.

Matt Myers’ pirate crew is one wild bunch of scallywags—or are they? With a love for mum, pink bunny slippers, and a treasure chest that includes candy and a teddy bear, this mob seems closer to their readers in personality than to historical swashbuckling swaggerers. Kids will laugh out loud as Captain Crave and his pirates run amok at the beach, farm and zoo; “try on” possible pets, and discover the perfect companion.

Amid the commotion, Myers’ vibrant and detailed illustrations ramp up (plank up?) the humor: the ship’s figure head joins in the judging of the captain’s daring-do, a goat nibbles the captain’s pants, exposing his polka-dotted boxers, the no-feeding warning above the lion’s cage includes a picture of a boot with a slash across it, and even the skull on Captain Crave’s hat demonstrates its opinion of the new crew member.

For pirate—and pet—lovers Pirate’s Perfect Pet is a treasure to be added to home, school, and library bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Candlewick Press, 2017 | ISBN 978-0763672881

Discover more about Beth Ferry and her books—available now and upcoming—on her website.

Step into the galleries of Matt Myers to view an incredible array of artwork on his website.

National Pet Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pet-maze

Find the Pet Maze

 

Finding the perfect pet can take time! In this printable Find the Pet Maze, a young detective is on the case! Can you help? Here’s the Solution!

Picture Book Review

November 6 – National Pet Awareness Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-cover

About the Holiday

Let’s give a shout-out to our best friends! Who are they? Our pets, of course! Small (or large) and fury (or feathered or scaled or finned), our pets give us unconditional love and loads of happiness. Just watching them navigate their day is entertaining and educational. National Pet Awareness Month was established to celebrate these in-home pals and remind pet owners to ensure that their pets have everything they need to live a long and healthy life. This month take extra time to have fun with your pet!

Pirate’s Perfect Pet

Written by Beth Ferry | Illustrated by Matt Myers

 

In the vast ocean teeming with sharks, Captain Crave noticed a small bottle bobbing just off the port side of his ship. With a bound from the plank, he dove into the sea and retrieved it. As he balanced himself on the tip of a shark’s nose and the bottle on the tip of his hook, the captain’s crew cheered and held up scores of 8.6 to 10 for his performance.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-dive

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

Back on deck, Captain Crave uncorked the bottle and unrolled the message. It was a letter from his mum. She had found a “lovely list” in Be Your Best Buccaneer magazine and was sending it on along with a doubloon for his treasure chest. He passed the list on to his first mate, who read aloud: “‘Think you’re the Perfect Pirate Captain? Use our handy checklist to be sure.’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-retrieving-bottle

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

On the list was “Ship?” “‘Check,’ replied the captain.” He could also check off courage and daring, treasure, eye patch, and hook; he was still working on peg leg. But then the first mate got to “pet.” Captain Crave was surprised, but he wanted to be the best buccaneer he could. “‘Well, shuck me an oyster and set sail for land. We needs to find me a pet,’” he said.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-first-mate

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

When they landed on the beach, they were happy to see that “they caused quite a commotion, as good pirates should.” They immediately began searching for a pet. The crab was “‘too cranky,’” the octopus was “‘too clingy,’” and the clam was “‘too quiet.’” They left the beach and headed to a farm, where again they caused a commotion. They checked out a goat, a donkey, and  a goose, but none of them seemed perfect either.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-beach

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

When they entered the zoo, you can imagine the commotion they caused. Here, they tried out an elephant that was “‘too big,’” a koala that was “‘too cuddly,’” and a lion that was just “‘Yikes!’” But the trip wasn’t a total loss. By the end of it, Captain Crave was able to check “peg leg” off the Best Buccaneer list. The zookeeper had an idea on where the pirates could look and drove them straight to the Pet Emporium.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-peg-leg

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

The pirates couldn’t believe how many pets there were to choose from. Captain Crave took a stroll around the shop and then heard a squawk. Just as he gazed upward, he was bombarded by a splat. “‘I’ve been poop-decked,’ he yelled.” His crew were incensed and chased the parrot around the store. They even wondered if they should eat it.

But Captain Crave took a good long look at the parrot, who had landed on his hook. He could see that the parrot was brave, he knew that it had “caused quite a commotion,” and when he asked the parrot, “‘Do ye happen to know—in land, sea, or sky—any pirate-worthy pets?’” The parrot had an answer. Giving up his mum’s shiny doubloon, Captain Crave left the Pet Emporium with the perfect pet on his shoulder.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-pet-emporium

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, courtesy of Myerspaints.com.

Readers will love Beth Ferry’s raucous and riotously funny pirate adventure where the treasure sought isn’t gold or jewels but something more valuable—a beloved pet. Along the way, kids will adore Ferry’s dialogue-rich storytelling that includes plenty of clever “pirate speak” and a brilliant bit on how the Captain attains his desired peg leg. With a nod toward a bird’s talent for target shooting, Ferry taps into her audience’s sense of humor, and as the captain finds his perfect pet, kids will also giggle at the parrot’s puns.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pirate's-perfect-pet-zoo

Image copyright Matt Myers, 2017, text copyright, Beth Ferry, 2017. Courtesy of Candlewick Press.

Matt Myers’ pirate crew is one wild bunch of scallywags—or are they? With a love for mum, pink bunny slippers, and a treasure chest that includes candy and a teddy bear, this mob seems closer to their readers in personality than to historical swashbuckling swaggerers. Kids will laugh out loud as Captain Crave and his pirates run amok at the beach, farm and zoo; “try on” possible pets, and discover the perfect companion.

Amid the commotion, Myers’ vibrant and detailed illustrations ramp up (plank up?) the humor: the ship’s figure head joins in the judging of the captain’s daring-do, a goat nibbles the captain’s pants, exposing his polka-dotted boxers, the no-feeding warning above the lion’s cage includes a picture of a boot with a slash across it, and even the skull on Captain Crave’s hat demonstrates its opinion of the new crew member.

For pirate—and pet—lovers Pirate’s Perfect Pet is a treasure to be added to home, school, and library bookshelves.

Ages 4 – 8

Candlewick Press, 2017 | ISBN 978-0763672881

Discover more about Beth Ferry and her books—available now and upcoming—on her website.

Step into the galleries of Matt Myers to view an incredible array of artwork on his website.

National Pet Awareness Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pet-maze

Find the Pet Maze

 

Finding the perfect pet can take time! In this printable Find the Pet Maze, a young detective is on the case! Can you help? Here’s the Solution!

Picture Book Review