June 17 – It’s National Camping Month

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About the Holiday

For some, camping is the best way to spend a vacation. This month’s holiday celebrates that love of adventure and encourages people to spend some time in the great outdoors. Of course, there’s giddy excitement for kids in just setting up a tent in the backyard too, so camping close to home this year can be just as fun as pitching a tent in a national park. There’s just one requirement wherever you camp – don’t forget the marshmallows!

Tundra Books sent me a copy of Now? Not Yet! for review consideration. All opinions are my own. 

Now? Not Yet!

By Gina Perry

 

Geared up for camping, Moe and Peanut head down the path that leads into the woods. They’re still within sight of home (only a few steps away, in fact) when Peanut asks, “‘Can we go swimming now?’” But Moe, with his stout walking stick wants to hike a bit first and answers, “‘Not yet.’” Turn the page and Peanut has spied a glimpse of blue water. Now must be the time for swimming, but Moe has his binoculars trained on an owl, so “‘not yet.’”

When they stop for a snack, Peanut unpacks his swim fins, beach ball, floating ring, and bunny toy on the way to finding his apple and banana, while Moe neatly nibbles trail mix from a baggie. A little farther on, Peanut’s so antsy to swim that he’s doing handstands in his swim fins, but the time’s not right now either because Moe thinks they’re lost.

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Image copyright Gina Perry, 2019, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Poor Peanut, he falls and comes up covered in pinecones and prickly pine needles, which unfortunately get transferred to Moe. Phew! They’ve found their campsite by the lake, and Peanut begs on his knees to go swimming. “‘Now?’ said Peanut. ‘Not yet,’ said Moe. ‘It’s time to make camp.’” This camp-making is kind of fun, Peanut thinks as he hangs the tent poles between two trees and plays limbo, uses a tent pole to draw a picture of Moe in the dirt, and then toddles on tent-pole stilts. Certainly the campsite must be ready by now. Why can’t they just go swimming? Moe says they “need to set up the tent.”

Peanut is starting to lose his patience, and Moe is starting to lose his patience plus he’s being attacked by mosquitoes. There’s just so much to do before swimming. The backpacks need unpacking, the campfire needs to be built, and… “‘where are the tent poles?’” Peanut has a breakdown—“Now! Now! Now!” And Moe has a breakdown—“NOT YET!”

Moe walks off to cool down while Peanut looks around the toy-strewn campsite sadly. He knows what he has to do. He sets up the tent, hangs up the towels and sets out the teapot and mugs, gathers firewood, and misses Moe. But Moe isn’t far away. He peeks over the tent and stealthily puts on Peanut’s swim mask. “NOW!” he announces while running and leaping into the lake. Peanut cannonballs in after him. They play and splash and finally dry off. Warm and cozy in their PJs next to a crackling fire, they happily eat beans from a can. The sky grows dark and Peanut figures it’s time for bed. But “‘Not yet,’” Moe says. They have one s’more thing to do.

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Image copyright Gina Perry, 2019, courtesy of Tundra Books.

In their second story, Moe and Peanut are heading out on an adventure, and like many kids, Peanut is focused on one thing, and one thing only, about the trip—swimming. Meanwhile, Moe is the keeper of all things practical and logistical. As we all know from our own kids or memories, a minute can feel like an hour, an hour like several, and a day like for…ev…er. Gina Perry taps into that feeling with verve and humor drawing out the trip to the campsite with such adult preoccupations as bird watching, map watching, splinter pulling, and the rigors of actually setting up camp. And it’s not that Peanut means to be a bother, he’s just brimming with excitement for fun, fun, fun!

Perry moves these two forces along at a brisk pace with her well-timed traded choruses of “Now?” and “Not yet.” When the clash comes in a two-page spread where each loses their cool in nearly mirror images, both kids and adults will laugh at the truth of it all. As Moe walks off and Peanut takes up the work of setting up camp, adults will understand that their kids are watching, learning, and empathetic, and kids will feel empowered to take control of their feelings and help out. The final pages showing Moe and Peanut swimming and enjoying the campfire offer reconciliation and that fun, fun, fun, Peanut (and Moe) were looking for.

Perry’s art is always bright and inviting and full of clever details. Kids will love Peanut’s antics, toy-laden backpack, and talent with tent poles, while adults will sympathize with Moe who suffers the slings and arrows of mosquitoes, sunburn, and passed-off splinters. The front endpaper depicts Moe and Peanut’s hike from home, through the woods, and to the campsite; the back endpaper portrays Peanut’s drawing of the same hike.

A funny, sweet-natured story that adults and kids will love to share, Now? Not Yet! is an endearing summer read and a must to join Too Much? Not Enough! on home, classroom, and library bookshelves.

Ages 3 – 7

Tundra Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1101919521

To learn more about Gina Perry, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Gina Perry

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I’m so thrilled to be chatting with Gina Perry about her inspirations for Moe and Peanut, this duo’s inclusion in Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, her early work in the scrapbooking market, and so much more!

Both Moe and Peanut are so sweet-natured. They just have different priorities sometimes. What or who inspired these characters and their particular adventures at home (Too Much! Not Enough!) and while camping (Now? Not Yet!)?

I think that is a lovely way to sum up Moe and Peanut. Their base personalities formed long ago from a lot of playing in my sketchbook. Moe is rooted in myself and other adults who do love play, but in a structured way. Peanut is rooted in all the little energetic kids I knew before having my own children, particularly my niece and nephew.  Their specific adventures are definitely inspired by my own kids. Indoor messes on rainy days, bubble faces, block towers—I had plenty of inspiration for that while raising my son and daughter. And I dedicated NOW? NOT YET! to Piper because of her super-charged love of play and swimming.

Are you a Moe, a Peanut or a little of both? In what way?

I am far more like Moe because I don’t leave home without the map, enjoy looking at birds, and also get a red face when dealing with mosquitos and stress. But the Peanut side of me also loves lakes and drawing in the dirt. I think because I was the youngest and my sisters were four and eight years older, I really remember feeling like a pesky little sister when I was the age of my readers.

In Now? Not Yet! Moe and Peanut go camping. Do you like camping? If so, are you a glamper or a traditional camper? What’s your favorite part of camping?

Camping confession: I have never slept outside! I found bear droppings in our backyard last month so I’m not sure I’ll check the box on backyard camping anytime soon, either. I do love going for day hikes and fondly remember lots of family vacations at rustic cabins on lakes in New Hampshire and Maine. I’ve definitely experienced all parts of Peanut and Moe’s adventure—note how we end the story before bedtime! My favorite part when I’m on a hike is spotting animals. I’m still waiting to see a moose in real life, but I snuck one in the book as an homage to a childhood dream.

Your artistic style is so distinctive—I immediately recognize an illustration as yours before I see your name on it. Can you talk a little about how you developed your style? What changes did Peanut and Moe go through as you worked on Too Much! Not Enough!?

That is a lovely compliment – thank you! I’ve been through lots of experimenting with my illustration style. I think always being willing to try new approaches and following lots of other illustrators and artists has helped me land where I am now. I really enjoy creating very simple but distinct characters and then letting the colors take over. The basic character design for Peanut and Moe was pretty solid early on (and many years before they were published!) but I do appreciate that I had time and confidence to try some bolder color choices that I think made their story shine.

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My editor smartly suggested that we up the level of mess from my dummy. The addition of all those block, glitter, and car elements really improved the book, and the narrow color palette made it still feel friendly even at its messiest. In their first book, I wanted to maintain a cheerful, bold color palette despite the rainy day. In their second book I worried how I would continue that color story in the outdoors. I chose to keep their environment in bright, but natural colors and played up that first color palette in their gear and clothing. I loved designing their evening attire!

This year Too Much! Not Enough! was selected for Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library. Can you tell readers about this program and how your book was chosen? What does it mean for Moe and Peanut?

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Moe and Peanut do the dishes in Too Much? Not Enough!

I am so thrilled that TOO MUCH! was chosen for this amazing book gifting program that delivers a new book each month for a child from birth to school age. Imagination Library now has programs across the US, UK, Canada, Australia, and Ireland and has mailed over 120 million books at no cost to families. Their Blue Ribbon Committees review and select titles based on their themes and concepts and aligned to one of five age groups. The website does an amazing job describing the program and how books are chosen and I hope all new or expecting parents look into this opportunity for their child. It means that this year, Peanut and Moe will be heading to thousands of young children (2-3 years of age) across Canada. Having so many new readers meet Moe and Peanut is exciting!

Before you concentrated on writing and illustrating books for children, you worked in animation and as an art director for the scrapbooking market. I’ve always wondered how some patterns of paper come to be. What is the process behind creating scrapbook paper and how certain subjects, colors, and designs are chosen.

When I started at that first scrapbooking company they were transitioning from a stencil-based business. The scrapbooking market was booming back then and it was a great opportunity for me to learn a totally new area and get experience as an illustrator. There was a lot of trial and error in figuring out how to make appealing and usable patterns that could be mixed and matched. We tracked fashion and illustration trends by going to trade shows and even shopping trips. Some collections were fashion based, others revolved around the events you would put in a scrapbook – birthdays, weddings, holidays, etc. It was a collaborative process involving designers, art directors, and the sales teams. My favorite job was finding new illustrators to work with, giving them a brief, then seeing the magic they sent back.

I saw on your blog that this year you participated in World Read Aloud Day by having Skype calls with students in New York, Connecticut, Texas, Florida, and Ukraine! That’s a lot of kids to reach! They must be thrilled! Can you talk a little about what you like about Skype calls, what you do during the calls, and how the kids react?

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A class listens to Gina Perry on World Read Aloud Day.

World Read Aloud Day is amazing. I encourage all authors to participate. I spend so much time working alone (especially in the winter!), that it’s a real gift to open up Skype and connect to a classroom full of enthusiastic readers. It’s usually a 20-minute call and most authors follow this formula: read one of your books, take questions from students, then share a few favorite books by other authors. But the variation is in the kids! How do they react to my book and what interesting questions do they have? Kids are so creative and often think of things I haven’t or share personal connections to a character or even to my story about being an illustrator and author.

What’s up next for you?

I have been squirreling away on some fun new projects that I can’t say too much about at the moment. I will say that one book was very much inspired by my school visits and drawing with kids. Another is inspired by welcoming a new puppy into our home this year.

What’s your favorite holiday and why?

I don’t know how you can compete with Halloween. The candy, creative costumes, spooky decorations, all-are-welcome and low-pressure vibe really make it a winner. And did I mention candy?

Thanks, Gina for joining me today! Happy Book Birthday to Moe and Peanut and Now? Not Yet! I wish you all the best with this series and all of your books and can’t wait to see what comes next!

You can connect with Gina Perry on

Her website | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestTwitter

National Camping Month Activity

CPB - campfire craft 2

A Fun In-Home Campfire

 

Kids and their friends and family can enjoy the cozy fun of a campfire in their own family room with this craft that’s easy to make from recycled materials. While the supplies might make the campfire artificial, kids will love it if the marshmallows are the real thing!

Supplies

  • Three or four paper or cardboard tubes
  • Cylindrical bread crumbs or oatmeal container
  • Tissue paper in red, orange, and yellow
  • Brown craft paint
  • Brown marker
  • Brown construction paper or white paper
  • Strong glue or hot glue gun
  • Chopsticks (one for each person)
  • Marshmallows

CPB - campfire craft container

Directions

To Make the Logs

  1. Cover the ends of the tubes with circles of brown construction paper or white paper and glue into place
  2. Paint the tubes and the ends if needed, let dry
  3. Paint the sides of the cylindrical container with the brown paint, let dry
  4. With the marker draw tree rings on the ends of the tubes. Decorate the sides with wavy lines, adding a few knot holes and swirls.

To Make the Fire

  1. Cut 9 squares from the tissue paper (3 in each color, about 8 to 6-inch square)
  2. Layer the colors and gather them together at one tip. Fold over and hold them together with a rubber band.
  3. To Assemble the Campfire
  4. Stack the tube logs
  5. Put the tissue paper fire in the middle of the logs

To “Roast” Marshmallows

  1. Stick marshmallows on chopsticks for “roasting” and eating!

You can keep your logs and fire in the cylindrical log until the next time!

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You can find Now? Not Yet! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 11 – Making Life Beautiful Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was established to celebrate all of those people who make life more fun, meaningful, joyful—more beautiful—for someone else. This can be done in so many ways, from spending more time talking with someone to using your talents to make something you know a friend, family member, or coworker would love, to just giving a smile to those you meet during the day. Making someone else feel good will make life more beautiful for you too!

Ray

By Marianna Coppo

 

At the bottom of the staircase there’s a closet. This is where Ray lives. Ray is a lightbulb. Before taking up residence in the closet, Ray lived in the family room (which was fun) and in the bathroom (which was not so much). Now, though he hung above a collection of stuff—like winter hats and scarves, books, cleaning supplies, an elephant-shaped watering can, some old toys, and a spider—that gave him something to count when he was bored. Sometimes, the child made a fort in the closet and hid out reading books.

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Copyright Marianna Coppo, 2020, courtesy of Tundra Books.

But there’s a downside: “The closet, the thing, and even Tom the spider often disappear. Ray does not like this.” These times were even more boring; even Ray’s sleep was “dreamless.” Then one day, Ray felt a twist. Then he was moving and seeing the world pass upside down. When the car stops, he finds himself outside in a place he’s never seen before. “Ray can’t tell where it begins or where it ends,” and there are way too many things to count.

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Copyright Marianna Coppo, 2020, courtesy of Tundra Books.

When the man and the child go to sleep now, Ray stays awake. He makes a wish on a shooting star just before he falls asleep, just before dawn. “When he wakes up, right there in front of him, shines the biggest light bulb in the world.” Seeing the sun gives Ray a whole new perspective on the world. Soon, the man and the boy and Ray are heading back home. The same closet awaits. But for Ray, it will never be dark or boring again.

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Copyright Marianna Coppo, 2020, courtesy of Tundra Books.

To read Marianna Coppo’s Ray for the first time is to feel all the wonder of new discovery, imagination, and creativity. When reading Ray for the second time (which kids will beg to do after Ray’s new perspective is revealed), the story unfolds with new enlightenment that invites readers to linger on each page. Ray, with his bright eyes, rosy cheeks, little smile, and filament that creates a tuft of hair is an endearing character that kids will love.

Coppo’s story is a sweet metaphor for discovering the wonders of the wider world and the value of engaging kids in stimulating experiences. It also reminds us that too often we can be “in the dark” and that looking at things differently results in new perspectives and more appreciation. Coppo’s clever illustrations invite interaction and close observation as the items in the closet transform into so much more after Ray’s return from the camping trip. Ray’s vision of himself has also changed: in his dreams he is now the sun shining on his little world.

A unique story that encourages the exploration and introspection that sparks imagination and self-esteem, Ray would be a favorite for home, school, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 7

Tundra Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-0735265776

Discover more about Marianna Coppo, her books, and her art on her website.

Making Life Beautiful Day Activity

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Share Your Bright Idea! Page

 

Do you sometimes have a lightbulb moment when an idea seems just right? Use this printable Share Your Bright Idea! Page to write about or draw your idea!

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You can find Ray at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop| IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

 

September 29 – World Rivers Day

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About the Holiday

Following the 2005 launch of the United Nations Water for Life Decade, internationally known river advocate, Mark Angelo, proposed the establishment of World Rivers Day. The holiday celebrates the value of rivers worldwide and promotes awareness of the importance of keeping rivers pollution free. In the United States alone, 65% of drinking water comes from rivers and streams. Rivers in virtually every country face an array of threats, and only through our active involvement can we ensure their health in the years ahead. To help the cause, join a volunteer river clean-up crew, help monitor water quality, or learn more about your local river system. To learn more, visit the World Rivers Day website.

River

By Elisha Cooper

 

As a woman begins her solitary trip on a mountain lake, she turns and waves to her family. The familiar shore recedes, and she dips her oar into the blue water under gray skies and in the shadow of the tall mountains. “Three hundred miles stretch in front of her. A faraway destination, a wild plan. And the question: Can she do this?” As she enters the Hudson River, she plucks a pebble from the shallow water and places it beside her gear. Here, she must navigate the scattered rocks—and one that is not a rock at all, but a moose taking a dip.

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Copyright Elisha Cooper, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

Ahead, she rides rapids that steal her hat and threaten to flip her. But she hangs on and makes it out on the other side. Now it’s time to set up camp for the night. Huddled in her tent, “she is alone, but not. The river stays beside her, mumbling to her and to itself all through the night.” With the dawn, she is on the river again, along with “otters, ducks, dragonflies, a kingfisher.” When she stops to pick blackberries, a bear cub ambles by to watch. The woman backs away slowly and continues down the river.

When she comes to a dam, she must carry her canoe. She trips, falls, and bloodies her knee, but on the other side of the dam, she returns to her paddling. When she comes to a waterfall, she gets in line for her turn to go through the lock. Once on her way again, she moves on to “farms with faded barns, to villages with white clapboard houses, to chimneyed factories on the outskirts of a town. Here, she pulls her canoe onto a levee where two boys are fishing. They ask her where she’s going, and she tells them. “It feels funny to talk.” As she walks into town, her legs also feel funny beneath her. She buys supplies and replaces her hat. That night is spent on a small island.

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Copyright Elisha Cooper, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

When she wakes, the white fog has blanketed everything. She can’t see the river, but she watches an eagle high in a tree eating its breakfast. She takes out her sketchbook and draws. The fog lifts and she continues her journey. The days and nights are marked by her hardening callouses and darkening suntan, shortening pencils and waning sketchbook pages. She paddles past “craggy hills” and “around bell-ringing buoys, next to railway tracks and a clattering freight train.”

She dodges a tugboat oblivious to her presence and makes it to another village, where she mails postcards and buys a cookie. A rain drop falls just as she climbs back into her canoe. The raindrop turns into a drizzle and then “a single sheet blowing sideways. A squall.” Her canoe capsizes, “dumping her into the raging water.” When she is able, she drags her canoe and herself onto a rocky shore. “Shivering, she takes stock. Tent, gone, Clothes, soaked. Sketchbook, safe.”

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Copyright Elisha Cooper, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

In the morning she starts again. As she rounds a bluff, the city spreads out in front of her. Far above her a gull watches as she makes her way past skyscrapers and boats large and small to the harbor and on to the boatyard, where “a bearded man in overalls—the builder of her canoe”—eagerly waits to hear about her trip and the sturdiness of her craft. After a cup of coffee, she launches her canoe for the last leg of her journey.

She is now in the open ocean with its wild waves. The horizon beckons, “but closer in she sees the lighthouse, and she knows it is time for her to be home.” She paddles harder and faster. “She can’t wait to be with them again. Can’t wait to tell them about moose and eagles, rapids and storms…to turn her sketches into paintings and her words into a story.” Her family is on shore waving, her dog running into the surf to greet her. She scuds into the shallows “…and brings the canoe to shore.”

An Author’s Note about the creation of River as well as a Note on the Hudson River and a list of sources and reading resources follows the text.

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Copyright Elisha Cooper, 2019, courtesy of Orchard Books, Scholastic, Inc.

Elisha Cooper’s loving and lyrical tribute to nature, courage, and self-reliance is nothing short of spectacular. His fluid storytelling plays out with the rhythm of an oar cutting and pushing a canoe along while transporting readers smoothly through this most evocative journey. With exquisite descriptions and compelling obstacles that will leave children wide-eyed and holding their breath, River is an expansive adventure story of one woman pitting herself against the power of the Hudson River and her own tenacity. The story is also one of love—respect for the environment, awe for community, and devotion to family and the support found there.

Cooper’s soft and sprawling watercolors envelop readers in the river setting, where the woman appears tiny against the rocky coastline, towering mountains, waterfalls, dams, and cityscapes. Double-page spreads swell the heart and invite wanderlust in even the most ardent homebodies. And there may be no better way to share this personal and universal journey than by gathering together and reading River in one sitting or—for younger children—breaking away at one of the many cliffhangers that will have everyone yearning to dip into the story again.

A must for school and public library collections, River is highly recommended for all home bookshelves as well for its inspiration for personal goals, it’s reflections on nature, and its encouragement that anything is possible.

Ages 4 – 8 and up

Orchard Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1338312263

To learn more about Elisha Cooper, his books, and his art, visit his website.

National River Day Activity

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World Rivers Word Search Puzzle

 

The world’s rivers provide homes for fish, animals, and birds; offer opportunities for recreation; and supply drinking water for millions. Can you find the names of twenty rivers of the world in this printable puzzle?

World Rivers Word Search | World Rivers Word Search Solution

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You can find River at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

July 31 – National Mutt Day

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About the Holiday

National Mutt Day, also known as Mixed Breed Dog Day, was established in 2005 by animal welfare advocate Colleen Paige, and our collective love of dogs has expanded this holiday from one day to two! National Mutt Day is now celebrated on July 31 and December 2. The purpose of these days is to raise awareness of the plight of mixed breed dogs abandoned and/or in shelters around the country. Approximately 80% of dogs in shelters are mixed breeds, and they often lose out on finding permanent homes to purebred dogs who are adopted much more quickly. Mixed breed dogs tend to be healthier, behave better, and often have sweeter temperaments than their purebred cousins, making them wonderful family pets. If you are considering adding a pet to your family, consider a mixed breed. You’ll be happy you did!

Wolf Camp

By Andrea Zuill

 

Homer is a regular dog—except when he’s feeling wolfish. He loves the lure of the hunt, and likes to pounce on stuffed Mr. Moose unawares. He thinks this is because it’s been proven by science that “all dogs have a bit of wolf in them.” When Homer takes to daydreaming, his mind wanders to the joys of living as “a real wolf,” running with the pack on the open plains. Then one day in addition to his kibble, a flier for Wolf Camp pours from the dog food bag.

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Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2016, courtesy of Schwartz & Wade.

The flier seems to offer everything Homer wants. “Have you ever felt like howling at the moon? Come join us!” it reads. Homer knows he has to go, so he makes sure his people see the notice—whether they are in the bathtub, in bed, relaxing, or just walking through the house. Finally his people relent, and on the designated day he boards the Wolf Camp bus and is off on an adventure.

Once at camp, Homer is “greeted by Fang and Grrr,” the counselors. Then he meets his fellow campers, big Rex and tiny Pixie. Fang gives a safety speech that includes staying together, refraining from chasing dangerous animals, and other rules. Their first lesson is “marking.” Could Homer help it if he was a little too close to Fang’s feet during practice? Next comes howling. Grrr and Fang sing out a chilling “Ahh-whooooo…” Pixie pipes up with a small “Yeeiiiiiip”; Rex gives an indeterminate  “Wahwawawawa…”; and Homer offers his best “Phooooooof…”

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Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2016, courtesy of Schwartz & Wade

When they learn to track, Rex can’t contain his excitement and shouts out “Look! A bunny!” “Shhhhhhh…,” Homer and Pixie remind him. At last the campers are shown how to hunt, even if Fang and Grrr do run ahead and with grrrs, snarls, growls, and a cloud of dust acquire dinner by themselves. The meal has “an interesting flavor,” which prompts Homer to write a letter home: “Dear People, How are you? I am fine. The food here is yucky and has hair on it.” He asks his family to send his favorite bacon-flavored doggie snacks as well as flea medicine “because there are a lot of bugs and they are gross.” He even includes a real “smashed bug” in the corner of the paper.

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Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2016, courtesy of Schwartz & Wade.

Living and sleeping in the wild have their challenges, but day-by-day the dogs adjust, becoming experts at marking rocks, howling “Ahh-Whoooo,” and hunting. And while taking down a moose may still be daunting, chasing squirrels is easy. The end of the week comes quickly and as Homer receives his “Honorary Wolf” certificate, he feels sad to be leaving his new friends. They howl “one more time as a pack,” and then it’s time to ride the bus back home.

While it’s good to be home with his people, his soft bed and electric blanket, and his familiar toys, Homer feels different. As nighttime falls he goes to the window and sings out a chilling “Ahh-whoooo-Ahh-Ahh-Whooowhooo….”

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Copyright Andrea Zuill, 2016, courtesy of Schwartz & Wade

Andrea Zuill’s funny story of a regular dog who dreams of being more by embracing his bolder heritage will delight dog owners and dog lovers alike. Endearing Homer, with his wagging tail, sweet smile, and unflagging perseverance, is an enthusiastic hero who inspires readers to never give up in the face of obstacles. Humorous dialogue and commentary by Homer, Rex, and Pixie as they perform their camp lessons are presented in speech and thought bubbles and will make kids giggle. Zuill’s nod to “people” camp makes Wolf Camp an accessible story that will resonate with any child facing a new situation, learning new skills, or being away from home for the first time.

Zuill’s vivid, cartoon-inspired illustrations are loaded with personality and expression. Kids will root for earnest Homer, shaggy Rex, and scrawny Pixie, and, while needle-nosed Fang and Grrr initially seem intimidating, they are counselors who have their camp charges’ best interests at heart.

Ages 4 – 8

Schwartz & Wade, 2016 | ISBN 978-0553509120 | ISBN 978-1984851659 (Paperback, 2018)

To learn more about Andrea Zuill and Wolf Camp, as well as view a portfolio of her illustrations, visit her website!

National Mutt Day Activity

CPB - Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

 

Each of the puppies has a friend. Can you match them up based on one trait? There may be multiple right answers! Why do you think the dogs you chose go together in this printable puzzle?

Peppy Puppies Match Up Puzzle

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You can find Wolf Camp at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

 

Picture Book Review

June 14 -It’s National Camping Month

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About the Holiday

June is the perfect month to explore the great outdoors up close through camping. Whether you enjoy pitching a tent, renting a cabin, or parking an RV, all the enjoyment of hiking, fishing, swimming, and of course toasting marshmallows and singing around the campfire await! 

Digger and Daisy Go Camping

Written by Judy Young | Illustrated by Dana Sullivan

 

Summer vacation has come and Digger and Daisy are packing up for another adventure together. At least Daisy is. She’s excited to go camping, “but Digger is worried. There might be bears,” he thinks. With reassurance from Daisy that the trip will be fun, Digger fills his own backpack and grabs his sleeping bag. Out on the trail, “There is a noise. Digger hears it. He looks all around. He is worried. ‘I hear a bear!’ says Digger.”

Daisy points out that “bears growl” and the sound Digger hears is just a bird singing in a tree. Digger and Daisy sing along too all the way to the lake. Here there’s another noise that worries Digger. “‘I hear a bear!’” he tells Daisy. But this sound is just a fish jumping, and soon Daisy and Digger are splashing along with it. After a nice swim, Daisy thinks a fire will warm them up. While they’re picking up sticks, Digger hears another noise that he’s sure is a bear. But this sound isn’t a growl either. It’s a squirrel munching on nuts.

Digger and Daisy enjoy roasted nuts too along with their hot dogs and marshmallows. “‘It will be dark soon,’ says Daisy. ‘We need to put up the tent.’” Daisy feels safe and cozy in her sleeping bag, but Digger hears a noise. “He looks all around. He is worried. ‘I hear a bear!’ says Digger.” But this sound isn’t a growl—Daisy tells him it’s a howl from the wind.

Daisy quickly falls asleep, but Digger doesn’t. He listens to all the sounds and recognizes the wind, a jumping fish, and the hoot of an owl. Satisfied, “Digger closes his eyes. Soon he is sound asleep.” Suddenly, there is a noise that Digger does not hear. It wakes Daisy. She shines her flashlight all around. “She is worried. ‘Digger, wake up! I hear a bear!’ says Daisy.” When Digger opens his eyes, the sound stops. Is a bear on their trail, or was it something a little tamer?

In their seventh adventure, Daisy plans an overnight camping trip. Daisy’s protective older-sibling instincts are sweetly in evidence as she encourages Digger to put his fear of bears aside and join her. Once in the forest, she reassures him that the noises he hears are harmless woodland creatures. Kids will love catching up with their favorite canine duo through Judy Young’s simple sentences that contain enough repetition of key words to bolster early readers’ confidence as well as accumulative drama, gentle suspense, and a humorous ending.

Every camping trip is filled with moments of wonder and humor, and Digger and Daisy’s adventure is no exception. In Dana Sullivan’s colorful snapshots, the birds are singing, butterflies flutter along, a gymnastic fish startles a fly, and a squirrel stuffs its cheeks with nuts. Daisy sports her trademark tutu skirt (even her bathing suit is a one-piece tutu), and Digger has not forgotten his favorite cap. Young readers will giggle as Digger panics, sending his firewood flying, and gets tied up in the tent ropes. They’ll also appreciate Sullivan’s cleverness in making Daisy and Digger’s tent look like a red doghouse. Of course, the siblings’ loving relationship is a highlight of this series, and this story strengthens that bond as Daisy takes care of her little brother and he in turn trusts her.

Fans of Digger and Daisy will want to add this new adventure to their collection. Digger and Daisy Go Camping also makes a sweet introduction to the series and will entice readers who have not yet met this brother and sister team to explore all of their escapades. The book would make a welcome addition to classroom and public library shelves as well.

Ages 5 – 7

Sleeping Bear Press, 2019 | ISBN 978-1534110229

Discover more about Judy Young and her books on her website.

To learn more about Dana Sullivan, his books, and his art, visit her website.

National Camping Month Activitycelebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-canoe-maze

Come Canoeing With Us Maze

 

These campers want to canoe together but first they must pick up their friend from the center of the lake. They need your help navigating their way in this printable puzzle.

Come Canoeing With Us Maze Puzzle |  Come Canoeing With Us Maze Solution

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-digger-and-daisy-go-camping

You can find Digger and Daisy Go Camping at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 4 – It’s National Camping Month and Interview with Author/Illustrator Gina Perry

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About the Holiday

For some, camping is the best way to spend a vacation. This month’s holiday celebrates that love of adventure and encourages people to explore some of the gorgeous national parks, campsites, and trails all across the country. Of course, there’s giddy excitement for kids in just setting up a tent in the backyard too. So, whether you camp with an RV, pack up the car with tents and other gear, or just enjoy a different vista at home, enjoy camping this summer – and don’t forget the marshmallows!

Tundra Books sent me a copy of Now? Not Yet! for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m thrilled to be teaming with Tundra and Gina Perry in a giveaway of Now? Not Yet! See details below.

Now? Not Yet!

By Gina Perry

 

Geared up for camping, Moe and Peanut head down the path that leads into the woods. They’re still within sight of home (only a few steps away, in fact) when Peanut asks, “‘Can we go swimming now?’” But Moe, with his stout walking stick wants to hike a bit first and answers, “‘Not yet.’” Turn the page and Peanut has spied a glimpse of blue water. Now must be the time for swimming, but Moe has his binoculars trained on an owl, so “‘not yet.’”

When they stop for a snack, Peanut unpacks his swim fins, beach ball, floating ring, and bunny toy on the way to finding his apple and banana, while Moe neatly nibbles trail mix from a baggie. A little farther on, Peanut’s so antsy to swim that he’s doing handstands in his swim fins, but the time’s not right now either because Moe thinks they’re lost.

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Image copyright Gina Perry, 2019, courtesy of Tundra Books.

Poor Peanut, he falls and comes up covered in pinecones and prickly pine needles, which unfortunately get transferred to Moe. Phew! They’ve found their campsite by the lake, and Peanut begs on his knees to go swimming. “‘Now?’ said Peanut. ‘Not yet,’ said Moe. ‘It’s time to make camp.’” This camp-making is kind of fun, Peanut thinks as he hangs the tent poles between two trees and plays limbo, uses a tent pole to draw a picture of Moe in the dirt, and then toddles on tent-pole stilts. Certainly the campsite must be ready by now. Why can’t they just go swimming? Moe says they “need to set up the tent.”

Peanut is starting to lose his patience, and Moe is starting to lose his patience plus he’s being attacked by mosquitoes. There’s just so much to do before swimming. The backpacks need unpacking, the campfire needs to be built, and… “‘where are the tent poles?’” Peanut has a breakdown—“Now! Now! Now!” And Moe has a breakdown—“NOT YET!”

Moe walks off to cool down while Peanut looks around the toy-strewn campsite sadly. He knows what he has to do. He sets up the tent, hangs up the towels and sets out the teapot and mugs, gathers firewood, and misses Moe. But Moe isn’t far away. He peeks over the tent and stealthily puts on Peanut’s swim mask. “NOW!” he announces while running and leaping into the lake. Peanut cannonballs in after him. They play and splash and finally dry off. Warm and cozy in their PJs next to a crackling fire, they happily eat beans from a can. The sky grows dark and Peanut figures it’s time for bed. But “‘Not yet,’” Moe says. They have one s’more thing to do.

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Image copyright Gina Perry, 2019, courtesy of Tundra Books.

In their second story, Moe and Peanut are heading out on an adventure, and like many kids, Peanut is focused on one thing, and one thing only, about the trip—swimming. Meanwhile, Moe is the keeper of all things practical and logistical. As we all know from our own kids or memories, a minute can feel like an hour, an hour like several, and a day like for…ev…er. Gina Perry taps into that feeling with verve and humor drawing out the trip to the campsite with such adult preoccupations as bird watching, map watching, splinter pulling, and the rigors of actually setting up camp. And it’s not that Peanut means to be a bother, he’s just brimming with excitement for fun, fun, fun!

Perry moves these two forces along at a brisk pace with her well-timed traded choruses of “Now?” and “Not yet.” When the clash comes in a two-page spread where each loses their cool in nearly mirror images, both kids and adults will laugh at the truth of it all. As Moe walks off and Peanut takes up the work of setting up camp, adults will understand that their kids are watching, learning, and empathetic, and kids will feel empowered to take control of their feelings and help out. The final pages showing Moe and Peanut swimming and enjoying the campfire offer reconciliation and that fun, fun, fun, Peanut (and Moe) were looking for.

Perry’s art is always bright and inviting and full of clever details. Kids will love Peanut’s antics, toy-laden backpack, and talent with tent poles, while adults will sympathize with Moe who suffers the slings and arrows of mosquitoes, sunburn, and passed-off splinters. The front endpaper depicts Moe and Peanut’s hike from home, through the woods, and to the campsite; the back endpaper portrays Peanut’s drawing of the same hike.

A funny, sweet-natured story that adults and kids will love to share, Now? Not Yet! is an endearing summer read and a must to join Too Much? Not Enough! on home, classroom, and library bookshelves.

Ages 3 – 7

Tundra Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1101919521

To learn more about Gina Perry, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Meet Gina Perry

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I’m so thrilled to be chatting with Gina Perry about her inspirations for Moe and Peanut, this duo’s inclusion in Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library, her early work in the scrapbooking market, and so much more!

Both Moe and Peanut are so sweet-natured. They just have different priorities sometimes. What or who inspired these characters and their particular adventures at home (Too Much! Not Enough!) and while camping (Now? Not Yet!)?

I think that is a lovely way to sum up Moe and Peanut. Their base personalities formed long ago from a lot of playing in my sketchbook. Moe is rooted in myself and other adults who do love play, but in a structured way. Peanut is rooted in all the little energetic kids I knew before having my own children, particularly my niece and nephew.  Their specific adventures are definitely inspired by my own kids. Indoor messes on rainy days, bubble faces, block towers—I had plenty of inspiration for that while raising my son and daughter. And I dedicated NOW? NOT YET! to Piper because of her super-charged love of play and swimming.

Are you a Moe, a Peanut or a little of both? In what way?

I am far more like Moe because I don’t leave home without the map, enjoy looking at birds, and also get a red face when dealing with mosquitos and stress. But the Peanut side of me also loves lakes and drawing in the dirt. I think because I was the youngest and my sisters were four and eight years older, I really remember feeling like a pesky little sister when I was the age of my readers.

In Now? Not Yet! Moe and Peanut go camping. Do you like camping? If so, are you a glamper or a traditional camper? What’s your favorite part of camping?

Camping confession: I have never slept outside! I found bear droppings in our backyard last month so I’m not sure I’ll check the box on backyard camping anytime soon, either. I do love going for day hikes and fondly remember lots of family vacations at rustic cabins on lakes in New Hampshire and Maine. I’ve definitely experienced all parts of Peanut and Moe’s adventure—note how we end the story before bedtime! My favorite part when I’m on a hike is spotting animals. I’m still waiting to see a moose in real life, but I snuck one in the book as an homage to a childhood dream.

Your artistic style is so distinctive—I immediately recognize an illustration as yours before I see your name on it. Can you talk a little about how you developed your style? What changes did Peanut and Moe go through as you worked on Too Much! Not Enough!?

That is a lovely compliment – thank you! I’ve been through lots of experimenting with my illustration style. I think always being willing to try new approaches and following lots of other illustrators and artists has helped me land where I am now. I really enjoy creating very simple but distinct characters and then letting the colors take over. The basic character design for Peanut and Moe was pretty solid early on (and many years before they were published!) but I do appreciate that I had time and confidence to try some bolder color choices that I think made their story shine.

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My editor smartly suggested that we up the level of mess from my dummy. The addition of all those block, glitter, and car elements really improved the book, and the narrow color palette made it still feel friendly even at its messiest. In their first book, I wanted to maintain a cheerful, bold color palette despite the rainy day. In their second book I worried how I would continue that color story in the outdoors. I chose to keep their environment in bright, but natural colors and played up that first color palette in their gear and clothing. I loved designing their evening attire!

This year Too Much! Not Enough! was selected for Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library. Can you tell readers about this program and how your book was chosen? What does it mean for Moe and Peanut?

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Moe and Peanut do the dishes in Too Much? Not Enough!

I am so thrilled that TOO MUCH! was chosen for this amazing book gifting program that delivers a new book each month for a child from birth to school age. Imagination Library now has programs across the US, UK, Canada, Australia, and Ireland and has mailed over 120 million books at no cost to families. Their Blue Ribbon Committees review and select titles based on their themes and concepts and aligned to one of five age groups. The website does an amazing job describing the program and how books are chosen and I hope all new or expecting parents look into this opportunity for their child. It means that this year, Peanut and Moe will be heading to thousands of young children (2-3 years of age) across Canada. Having so many new readers meet Moe and Peanut is exciting!

Before you concentrated on writing and illustrating books for children, you worked in animation and as an art director for the scrapbooking market. I’ve always wondered how some patterns of paper come to be. What is the process behind creating scrapbook paper and how certain subjects, colors, and designs are chosen.

When I started at that first scrapbooking company they were transitioning from a stencil-based business. The scrapbooking market was booming back then and it was a great opportunity for me to learn a totally new area and get experience as an illustrator. There was a lot of trial and error in figuring out how to make appealing and usable patterns that could be mixed and matched. We tracked fashion and illustration trends by going to trade shows and even shopping trips. Some collections were fashion based, others revolved around the events you would put in a scrapbook – birthdays, weddings, holidays, etc. It was a collaborative process involving designers, art directors, and the sales teams. My favorite job was finding new illustrators to work with, giving them a brief, then seeing the magic they sent back.

I saw on your blog that this year you participated in World Read Aloud Day by having Skype calls with students in New York, Connecticut, Texas, Florida, and Ukraine! That’s a lot of kids to reach! They must be thrilled! Can you talk a little about what you like about Skype calls, what you do during the calls, and how the kids react?

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A class listens to Gina Perry on World Read Aloud Day.

World Read Aloud Day is amazing. I encourage all authors to participate. I spend so much time working alone (especially in the winter!), that it’s a real gift to open up Skype and connect to a classroom full of enthusiastic readers. It’s usually a 20-minute call and most authors follow this formula: read one of your books, take questions from students, then share a few favorite books by other authors. But the variation is in the kids! How do they react to my book and what interesting questions do they have? Kids are so creative and often think of things I haven’t or share personal connections to a character or even to my story about being an illustrator and author.

What’s up next for you?

I have been squirreling away on some fun new projects that I can’t say too much about at the moment. I will say that one book was very much inspired by my school visits and drawing with kids. Another is inspired by welcoming a new puppy into our home this year.

What’s your favorite holiday and why?

I don’t know how you can compete with Halloween. The candy, creative costumes, spooky decorations, all-are-welcome and low-pressure vibe really make it a winner. And did I mention candy?

Thanks, Gina for joining me today! Happy Book Birthday to Moe and Peanut and Now? Not Yet! I wish you all the best with this series and all of your books and can’t wait to see what comes next!

You can connect with Gina Perry on

Her website | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestTwitter

National Camping Month Activity

CPB - campfire craft 2

A Fun In-Home Campfire

 

Kids and their friends and family can enjoy the cozy fun of a campfire in their own family room with this craft that’s easy to make from recycled materials. While the supplies might make the campfire artificial, kids will love it if the marshmallows are the real thing!

Supplies

  • Three or four paper or cardboard tubes
  • Cylindrical bread crumbs or oatmeal container
  • Tissue paper in red, orange, and yellow
  • Brown craft paint
  • Brown marker
  • Brown construction paper or white paper
  • Strong glue or hot glue gun
  • Chopsticks (one for each person)
  • Marshmallows

CPB - campfire craft container

Directions

To Make the Logs

  1. Cover the ends of the tubes with circles of brown construction paper or white paper and glue into place
  2. Paint the tubes and the ends if needed, let dry
  3. Paint the sides of the cylindrical container with the brown paint, let dry
  4. With the marker draw tree rings on the ends of the tubes. Decorate the sides with wavy lines, adding a few knot holes and swirls.

To Make the Fire

  1. Cut 9 squares from the tissue paper (3 in each color, about 8 to 6-inch square)
  2. Layer the colors and gather them together at one tip. Fold over and hold them together with a rubber band.
  3. To Assemble the Campfire
  4. Stack the tube logs
  5. Put the tissue paper fire in the middle of the logs

To “Roast” Marshmallows

  1. Stick marshmallows on chopsticks for “roasting” and eating!

You can keep your logs and fire in the cylindrical log until the next time!

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You can find Now? Not Yet! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 3 – Wild Koala Day

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About the Holiday

If you love koalas, you’ll want to join in on this Australian holiday that’s dedicated to celebrating koalas and protecting their habitats. Koalas survive by eating the gum leaves of eucalyptus trees, but these forests are threatened by deforestation, fire, and climate change. Conservationists are calling for the preservation and replanting of these important forests. To show solidarity with the cause and koalas, people are encouraged to wear gum leaves (or any leaf), plant a tree, and post a picture of a wild koala on social media, using #wildkoaladay. You can learn more about today’s holiday by visiting the Wild Koala Day website.

I received a copy of Koala Is Not a Bear from Sterling Children’s Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Sterling Children’s Books in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Koala Is Not a Bear

Written by Kristin L. Gray | Illustrated by Pachel McAlister

 

Koala couldn’t wait to go to camp, meet the other campers, and have lots of fun. Since this was her first trip away from home, she packed some of her favorite things in case she felt homesick. When she got to camp, she found a cabin for birds, one for crocodiles, and one for cats, but she couldn’t find her cabin. Just as she was about to ask for directions, Grizzly came running out to meet her and welcome her to Bear Cabin.

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Image copyright Rachel McAlister, 2019, text copyright Kristin L. Gray, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Koala was introducing herself when, “‘Hold it!’ said a voice. ‘Koala is NOT a bear.’” It was Kangaroo, who, Grizzly said, was “‘a bit of a know-it-all.’” Koala was tired from looking for the right cabin and only wanted a place to put her gear and relax. She showed off her “‘sharp teeth and claws,’” and Grizzly agreed that Koala must be a bear. But then Kangaroo reminded them that “‘crocodiles have sharp teeth and claws’” too.

Koala was not to be deterred and scampered up a tree just like a bear. Kangaroo countered with the example of lemurs, who also climb trees but are not bears. Koala had another bear-like trick up her sleeve, though, and let out a growl a bear could be proud of. Kangaroo brought up tigers. Koala then got down on all fours and crawled along accompanied by Grizzly. Duck had a sage observation that went like this: “‘If she walks like a bear and talks like a bear, she must be a bear.’”

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Image copyright Rachel McAlister, 2019, text copyright Kristin L. Gray, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

“‘Tail?’” questioned Kangaroo, and while Koala didn’t have a proper tail, she did have thick fur that kept her warm and dry. Grizzly figured the issue was settled and they all went into the cafeteria to eat. But not so fast. Kangaroo had a book, which she said proved Koala was not a bear. And instead of similarities, Koala began to see the differences between her and Grizzly. She didn’t like berries or fish and she didn’t hibernate during winter. Suddenly, Koala thought she “didn’t belong in Bear Cabin. Maybe she didn’t even belong at camp.”

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Image copyright Rachel McAlister, 2019, text copyright Kristin L. Gray, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Koala began to feel homesick and went off to a corner to look at the picture of her family she’d brought along. She had just opened her pouch to get out the photograph when, right behind her, Koala heard that familiar voice. “‘Aha! I knew it,’ cried Kangaroo. ‘Koala has a pouch! Like ME.” But when Kangaroo got a glimpse of Koala’s photograph, she recognized her great-aunt Quokka. “‘Your great-aunt?’” said Koala. “‘Quokka’s my great-aunt.’”

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Image copyright Rachel McAlister, 2019, text copyright Kristin L. Gray, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Koala had a feeling…and asked some more questions: had Kangaroo ridden in her mother’s pouch, been called a joey, and come from Australia? Yes, yes, yes, answered Kangaroo. Suddenly, Koala and Kangaroo knew exactly what Koala was—a marsupial—which made her and Kangaroo family! They both got a bear hug from Grizzly and went off to settle into Marsupial Cabin, just as Platypus arrived looking for Duck Cabin….

A short Author’s Note about marsupials follows the text.

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Image copyright Rachel McAlister, 2019, text copyright Kristin L. Gray, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

In her funny and layered story of mistaken identity, Kristin L. Gray reveals facts about koalas and the order marsupials while also making the point that we all embody more similarities than differences. As Koala narrows in on which cabin is hers, alert readers will enjoy besting Kangaroo in discovering who Koala will be bunking with. Duck provides humorous asides that will keep kids giggling, and the pitch-perfect surprise ending promises to send young animal lovers scurrying to do some research.

Through vibrant, action-packed illustrations, Rachel McAlister showcases all the ways in which Koala is like a bear—as well as crocodiles, lemurs, and tigers—but ultimately belongs in the marsupial family. Grizzly’s stalwart support of her new friend is endearing as she also shows her claws and teeth, climbs a tree, growls fiercely, crawls beside her, and in the end clasps her in a big bear hug when it’s discovered that Koala is actually a marsupial. The cafeteria scene shows happy camaraderie and invites readers to learn which scientific families the other campers fall into.

A fun story for animal lovers or to accompany science and STEM lessons in the classroom, Koala Is Not a Bear would make for an engaging story time at home or at school.

Ages 4 – 7

Sterling Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1454927457

Discover more about Kristin L. Gray and her books on her website.

To learn more about Rachel McAlister, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Koala Is Not a Bear Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Sterling Children’s Books in a Twitter giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Koala Is Not a Bear written by Kristin L. Gray | illustrated by Rachel McAlister

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from May 3 through March 9 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on May 10.

Prizing provided by Sterling Children’s Books

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

Wild Koala Day Activity

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Cute Koala Coloring Page

 

For a koala, a eucalyptus leaf is the perfect snack! Here’s a printable coloring page of a koala in its natural habitat to help you celebrate Wild Koala Day!

Cute Koala Coloring Page

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You can find Koala Is Not a Bear at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review