March 2 – Read Across America Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday, established by the National Education Association in 1997, encourages children all across the country to celebrate reading and all of its joys and benefits. To commemorate the day, authors, illustrators, politicians, athletes, librarians, and families hold special reading events in schools, libraries, bookstores, and community centers. A love of reading is one of life’s greatest pleasures and begun early can be a powerful force for future success. Celebrate today by reading with a child or on your own. There are fabulous worlds and stories waiting to be discovered.

Nerp!

By Sarah Lynne Reul

 

If you want to serve up a giggle-feast for your kids, you only need to open Nerp! To have them gobbling up the big slice of silliness Sarah Lynne Reul has whipped up. Part reptile, part fish, and completely adorable, the family conjured up by Reul—a mom, a dad, a baby, and their pet—are just getting ready to enjoy dinner.

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Copyright Sarah Lynne Reul, 2020, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books

The baby has just helped Mom plop out their pet’s food into its dish and is pointing out how delicious that pink wiggly blob it. But the little family friend looks aghast and lets out a very decided “NERP.” Just then, though, all attention turns to Dad who proudly holds aloft the bowl of jelly-bean colored “Frizzle frazzle hotchy potch!” The baby gazes at his dad pleadingly while pointing at the bowl. “Hotchy-potch?” he asks. Then, giving the bowl the side-eye as if it might jump up and bite him, the tyke pushes it away with a decided “NERP.”

Another bowl appears, this one full of “Mushy gushy bloobarsh.” This bowl is even more ominous than the first, and the baby gasps. Their long-snouted pup, however, is licking its lips. Mom and Dad were apparently ready for these first rejections and have two more dishes on hand, but now Baby—his eyes closed—cannot even stand to sit at the table. “NERPITY NERPITY NERPITY NERP!” he says.

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Copyright Sarah Lynne Reul, 2020, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books

Perhaps Mom and Dad have a personal chef stashed away somewhere because six more scrumptious meals—one even holding its own fork—emerge from the kitchen to entice the little one to eat. But where is Baby? His chair’s empty and his bib discarded. And yet there is a very welcome “ssluuurrrrrrrpppppp” sound coming from somewhere. Mom and Dad are so delighted, happy, thrilled to hear this sound of happy scarfing that they drop all of those carefully prepared and plated meals and rush to find out where it’s coming from.

But Whhhaaaaatttt!!!?? do they see? Their precious tot is down on all fours guzzling…pet food. Oh, well, shrugs Mom as Baby burps, but Dad is none too happy as he scrapes all of their hard work onto an enormous plate for a very happy pup who lets out a decided “YERP!” And with full bellies these two lay back with a “Yerpetty yerpetty yerpy yerp.”

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Copyright Sarah Lynne Reul, 2020, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books

Clever mashups of foodie words, tasty adjectives, and nonsense words that are fun to say make reading Nerp! aloud––and with verve––a joy.  Combining this entertaining dialogue with charming mixed-media illustrations set in a diorama made of cardboard, Sarah Lynne Reul creates a wholly original story that will keep children and adults laughing all the way through. Reul addresses that age-old food fight between finicky kids and frantic caregivers with hilarious dishes and facial expressions that perfectly reflect the emotions on both sides. Her pitch-perfect ending will delight kids and have adults nodding in appreciation.

Perfect for both reluctant and adventurous eaters as well as for all book lovers, Nerp! belongs on the reading menu at home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 3 – 7

Sterling Children’s Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1454934028

To learn more about Sarah Lynne Reul, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Read Across America Day Activity

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Books to Love, Books to Read Book Bag

 

True book lovers can’t go anywhere without a book (or two or three) to read along the way. With this easy craft you can turn a cloth bag into a kid-size book bag!

Supplies

  • Printable Templates: Books to Read Template | Books to Love Template or iron-on letters found at craft stores
  • Small cloth bag, available from craft or sewing stores—Recyclable Idea: I used the bag that sheet sets now come in
  • Cloth trim or strong ribbon, available from craft or sewing stores—Recyclable Idea: I used the cloth handles from shopping bags provided from some clothing stores
  • Scraps of different colored and patterned cloth. Or use quilting squares, available at craft and sewing stores
  • Pen or pencil for tracing letters onto cloth
  • Scissors
  • Fabric glue
  • Thread (optional)
  • Needle (optional)

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Directions

  1. Print the sayings and cut out the letters
  2. Trace letters onto different kinds of cloth
  3. Cut out cloth letters
  4. Iron cloth bag if necessary
  5. Attach words “Books to Read” to one side of bag with fabric glue
  6. Attach words “Books to Love” to other side of bag with fabric glue
  7. Cut cloth trim or ribbon to desired length to create handles
  8. Glue (or sew) handles onto the inside edge of bag

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You can find Nerp! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 8 – Opera Day

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About the Holiday

Opera has been a favorite art form since its beginnings in Italy in the 1500s. Combining magnificent voices, soaring arias, grand costumes, and dramatic storylines, operas continue to thrill audiences and gain new fans. To celebrate Opera Day today or at a time in the future, enjoy a performance in your area or find one on YouTube and gather your family and friends for an opera party.

I received a copy of Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse from Sterling Children’s Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be partnering with Sterling in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse

Written by Laura Sassi | Illustrated by Rebecca Gerlings

 

Fernando had many loves in his life—including chocolate, cheese, gumdrops, and popcorn—but what he loved most was “feasting on Mozart, Puccini, and Strauss, / and lending a paw at the Old Opera House.” Delores loved nothing more than being in the spotlight, and now she was getting the chance to leave her place in the chorus to “take center stage and be Diva Delores.” She warmed up in her dressing room with “Me-me-me-me!”

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Image copyright Rebecca Gerlings, 2018, text copyright Laura Sassi, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Fernando wanted to give Delores the benefit of all of his years of experience, but she wasn’t having it. A mouse was not a suitable helper for someone as great as she, she thought. At the rehearsal the next day, Delores was a flop, hitting wrong notes, missing her entrance, and the last song? Well…. From the back Fernando called out that he could help. He wrote cues on little cards “and—presto!—Delores knew just what to do.” You’d think Delores would be thankful, but instead she complained that a mouse’s help was just not proper for a diva, and she shooed Fernando away.

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Image copyright Rebecca Gerlings, 2018, text copyright Laura Sassi, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

The day before her big performance, Delores found that her dress didn’t fit. Again, Fernando rushed to her rescue, but what thanks did he get? Delores grumbled and fussed. “Then grabbing a bottle / of stinky perfume, / she spritzed poor Fernando / right out of the room!” Fernando went home, wanting to quit. But as he looked at his pictures of Mozart, Puccini, and Strauss, he knew that without him the show would fail and that he couldn’t quit now.

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Image copyright Rebecca Gerlings, 2018, text copyright Laura Sassi, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

First, he went to Delores and laid down the rules: “For starters, I’d like to hear / thank you and please / when I help fix your dress / or bring crackers and cheese.” Delores was startled and quickly said good night. At home she wondered: had she been rude? The next day, Delores was nervous. She tried calming herself with candy and tea. She even looked for Fernando, but he was nowhere to be found.

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Image copyright Rebecca Gerlings, 2018, text copyright Laura Sassi, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Standing on stage in the glare of the spotlights, “as the orchestra played, / Delores felt faint. / First she swooned… / then she swayed.” When she opened her mouth, no notes, no sound, no song came out. Then inside her wig she saw Fernando, who squeaked “‘You can do it.’” And then Delores did sing “with a voice rich and sweet.” When she forgot some words to her song, Fernando reminded her by tra-la-la-ing along.

The audience loved them. They cheered for Delores; they cheered for Fernando. Later, Delores admitted she could not have done it alone. Then she apologized to Fernando and asked for a fresh start on their friendship. “Of course!” he agreed, and now they bring down the house night after night as “the Opera House team!”

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Image copyright Rebecca Gerlings, 2018, text copyright Laura Sassi, 2018. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Laura Sassi’s clever and original story about teamwork and sharing the spotlight hits all the right notes in showing how accepting help can elevate anyone’s performance and lead to a new friendship. After playing second fiddle in the chorus, Delores finally gets her chance to shine, but her vanity exceeds her experience. When a tiny mouse offers help from his deep well of knowledge, Delores takes one look at Fernando’s diminutive size and rejects him and his advice. Through her perfect rhymes and musical rhythm, Sassi engages readers in how to graciously learn from another’s experience and encourages the Fernandos out there to keep trying, even when their initial offerings of assistance are rebuffed.

Rebecca Gerlings lends charm and humorous touches to Sassi’s tale, and the promise of the enticing cotton-candy fluff of a wig, introduced in the first pages and teased throughout the story, is comically and satisfyingly fulfilled in the end as Fernando directs Delores to a winning performance from within. Along the way, readers are treated to an octopus piano player, multiple meltdowns as Delores dispatches Fernando from her orbit, and demonstrations of persistence as the little mouse stands up for himself, good manners, and the honor of his beloved opera. 

A smart, fresh, and fun read aloud, Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse has multiple applications for discussing friendship, modesty, respect, and collaboration. The book would make a delightful addition to home, school, and public library bookshelves.

Ages 3 and up

Sterling Children’s Books, 2018 | ISBN 978-1454922001

Discover more about Laura Sassi and her books on her website.

To learn more about Rebecca Gerlings, her books, and her art, visit her website.

Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Sterling Children’s Books in a giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse, written by Laura Sassi | illustrated by Rebecca Gerlings

Here’s how to enter:

  • Follow Celebrate Picture Books
  • Retweet a giveaway tweet
  • Bonus: Reply with your favorite kind of music for extra entry

This giveaway is open from February 10 – February 17 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on February 18. 

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | Prizing provided by Sterling Children’s Books.

Opera Day Activity

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Sparkly Opera Glasses by Laura Sassi

 

Make a pair of these fancy glasses, then pretend you are at the opera while reading Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse.

Supplies for each pair of opera glasses

  • Two recycled toilet tissue tubes one large craft stick
  • Markers tacky glue
  • Two paper clips assorted fancy embellishments (We used feathers, sparkly gems and snippets of shimmery ribbon, but use whatever you have around the house. Be creative!)

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Directions

  1. Decorate the tissue tubes using markers.
  2. Glue the tubes side by side, as shown. Be sure to insert the craft stick in between so your opera glasses have a handle. Slip a paper clip at each end over the sealed part for extra  pressure while drying.
  3. Use tacky glue to affix whatever fancy embellishments you choose. The more the better!
  4. When dry, elegantly hold your opera glasses up to your eyes and pretend you are watching Diva Delores and Fernando at the opera!

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You can find Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

January 13 – It’s International Creativity Month

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About the Holiday

Are you an artist, a writer, a decorator, a chef? How about a floral arranger, a woodworker, a fashion designer, or a gardener? Inside almost every heart lies a desire to create. Whether you use your ingenuity in your job or as an escape from the routine, this month celebrates all that is innovative. Sometimes this comes not only in making something you can see or touch but in a new thought or a novel way of solving a problem—as seen in today’s book!

I received a copy of Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life for review consideration. All opinions are my own.

Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life: Hollywood Legend and Brilliant Inventor

Written by Laurie Wallmark | Illustrated by Katy Wu

 

In 1938 people were lining up to see Hedy Lamarr in her first English-language movie Algiers. Hedy was the talk of Hollywood, and journalists and photographers captured her every move—almost. What movie-goers and the press didn’t know was that Hedy Lamarr was also a brilliant inventor. Instead of attending fancy celebrity parties, after a long day on the set, “Hedy hurried home to work on her latest invention. Her brain overflowed with idea after idea for useful inventions.” While she never tried to sell her ideas—like the collar to help find lost pets or the “flavor cube that changed plain water into soda”—she designed and redesigned them to perfection.

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Image copyright Katy Wu, 2019, text copyright Laurie Wallmark, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

But how did Hedy get her start? She was born in Austria and as a child took apart mechanical objects just to see how they worked. Hedy’s father also loved science, and he encouraged his daughter to hold onto her dreams. In addition to science, Hedy loved movies and would use her dolls to reenact the scenes she saw.

When she got older, Hedy got a job as a script girl and then worked as an extra in a movie. She loved acting and once said, “‘I acted all the time…. I was a little living copybook. I wrote people down on me.’” While playing the lead in a stage play, the Hollywood producer Louis B. Mayer saw her and offered her movie contract. Hedy moved to America. It only took her six months to land a starring role in Algiers. After that she starred in many movies with some of the most famous actors and actresses. 

By now, the world was at war. One day, Hedy met George Antheil, a former weapons inspector who now composed music. Hedy remembered a “discussion she had overheard back in Europe about a problem with the guidance system for torpedoes. The guidance system couldn’t prevent the enemy from jamming the weapon’s radio signals” and sending it off course. She learned from George Antheil that the US Navy had the same problem.

They decided to team up to see if they could figure out a solution. Hedy was also an accomplished pianist, and she and George often played musical games on the piano. Once, while they played the same song in different octaves, Hedy had a brainstorm for building “a secure torpedo guidance system.” At the time, torpedo guidance systems only worked if the ship launching a torpedo and the torpedo were on the same frequency.

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Image copyright Katy Wu, 2019, text copyright Laurie Wallmark, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Hedy thought that if the ship and the torpedo could switch between a series of different frequencies, the enemy would be foiled. “Hedy called her discovery ‘the hopping of frequencies.” Working together, she and George devised a way to implement Hedy’s idea. When they presented their idea to the National Inventors Council, they were told the “idea had ‘great potential value.’”

There were still some issues to overcome to make the system automated, but Hedy and George answered those too. They applied for a patent, and a year later on August 11, 1942 it was granted. When they gave the idea to the United States Navy, “Hedy was proud her frequency-hopping idea might help America win the war.” But embroiled in the middle of the conflict, the Navy didn’t have “the time or money to implement a new system….”

Hedy, who still wanted to help America defeat the Nazis, was undaunted. She helped raise 25 million dollars by selling war bonds and volunteered at the Hollywood Canteen, where servicemen soon to be deployed gathered. Hedy went on to make more than twenty movies and continued to work on her inventions.

In the 1980s, the US Navy declassified Hedy’s frequency-hopping technology, meaning anyone could use it. Because the patent had long-ago expired, no one needed to give Hedy and George credit for the idea. “Companies raced to include frequency hopping in their own devices.” In 1997, Hedy and George were finally recognized when they “received the Pioneer Award from the Electronic Frontier Foundation for their significant contribution to computers.”

A timeline of Hedy Lamarr’s life, a description of how Hedy and George’s frequency-hopping technology worked, additional resources for further reading, and a list of Hedy’s movies follow the text.

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Image copyright Katy Wu, 2019, text copyright Laurie Wallmark, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Laurie Wallmark knows how to weave a riveting tale that draws readers in to the lives of fascinating and scientifically minded women throughout history. Her detailed biography of Hedy Lamarr will wow kids with the twists and turns of how a vital feature of the electronics they use every day came to be. A history not only of this famous woman but of the times and policies that denied Hedy Lamarr the recognition and profits she deserved, the story is sure to spark plenty of discussion. The inclusion of a few of Hedy’s ingenious ideas as well as quotes on acting, inventing, and her views on life give children a glimpse into the mind of this unique woman.

Katy Wu takes readers back to the 1940s with her stylish illustrations reminiscent of magazine images of the time that depict both Hedy’s glamourous and inventive sides. Even as Hedy steps out of a limo to the glare of flashbulbs, acts under stage lights, and watches movies thrown by a projector’s beam, she’s dreaming of going home to work on her inventions in the light of a desk lamp. When the story turns to Hedy’s frequency-hopping idea, Wu clearly portrays the problems with the torpedo guidance system and the way single-frequency and multiple-frequency communications work. The way player pianos were controlled and how Hedy and George Antheil used this idea is also well portrayed. The final images of people using Hedy’s technology today lets kids fully understand the impact that Hedy Lamarr has had on their lives.

An important story about an extraordinary woman, Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life: Hollywood Legend and Brilliant Inventor will inspire children to follow and accomplish all of their dreams. The book will spur creative thought across subject matter and would be a motivational addition to home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 5 and up

Sterling Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1454926917

Discover more about Laurie Wallmark and her books on her website.

To learn more about Katy Wu, and view a gallery of her book and art, visit her tumblr.

International Creativity Month Activity

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National Archives Coloring Book of Patents

 

The people at the National Archives of the United States in Washington DC chose some of their favorite patents from the past to share with you as a coloring book. As you have fun coloring these pages full of ideas, let yours fly too!

Click here to get your printable National Archives Coloring Book of Patents

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You can find Hedy Lamarr’s Double Life: Hollywood Legend and Brilliant Inventor at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

November 20 – It’s National Adoption Month

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About the Holiday

National Adoption Month was instituted in 1976 as a week-long celebration of adoption and raise awareness for the urgent need for adoptive families for children and youth in foster care. The holiday was expanded to include the entire month of November in 1995. This year’s theme is Youth Voices: Why Family Matters. This month gives adoptive families and families considering adoption a chance to talk about their experiences and find resources for this important type of family-building. To learn more, visit the American Adoptions website.

Moldilocks and the Three Scares: A Zombie Tale

Written by Lynne Marie | Illustrated by David Rodriguez Lorenzo

 

“In a big haunted house—with room enough for four, there lived three Scares: Papa Scare, Mama Scare, and Baby Scare.” One cold night Papa Scare prepared a midnight snack of “sliced finger sandwiches” and “Alpha-Bat Soup.” Mama Scare was working in her lab and wishing she had an assistant, while Baby Scare wished he had someone to play with. When the food was ready, Papa poured a tub of soup for himself, a medium-size bowl for Mama, and a tiny bowl for Baby. But the soup was so hot that they couldn’t eat it and decided to take a walk while the soup cooled.

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Image copyright David Rodriguez Lorenzo, 2019, text copyright Lynne Marie, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Meanwhile, Moldilocks, a zombie, was sleepwalking through the graveyard when she smelled the aroma of the Alpha-Bat Soup. Finding the house empty, she climbed in the window and headed for the kitchen. Papa’s soup was too hot; Mama’s soup was too cold; but Baby’s soup was just right—so “she gulped it all up.” With a full belly, she went in search of somewhere to sit and found three chairs in front of the TV.

First, “she strapped into Papa’s chair,” but it was too hard. Mama’s chair was too soft. But Baby’s chair was just right—until it’s bony seat snapped. Moldilocks decided it was time for a nap anyway, so she looked for a place to sleep. Papa’s slab was too hard; Mama’s sarcophagus was too tight; but Baby’s bed was just right. “She buried herself under the sheets and fell asleep. Zzzzzz…”

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Image copyright David Rodriguez Lorenzo, 2019, text copyright Lynne Marie, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

When the Scares came home, they immediately noticed that someone had been tasting their soup and that Baby Scare’s bowl was empty. Then they discovered that someone had broken all of their chairs—leaving Baby’s chair nothing but a pile of dust. Their ghost dog, Plasma, tracked Moldilocks to the bedroom, where the Scares learned that someone had been lying on Papa and Mama’s beds and found Moldilocks snoozing in Baby’s bed.

“‘How dare you…’” Papa bellowed to a quivering Moldilocks “‘…eat without us!’” Then Mama Scare hugged Moldilocks and told her she could be her lab assistant. And Baby Scare wondered if she’d like to play “Corpse and Robbers” with him and his “Deady Bear.” Mama Scare gave Moldilocks another squeeze and said, “‘A little ghoul is the perfect addition to our family!’” Moldilocks agreed, and they all “lived hauntingly every after.”

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Image copyright David Rodriguez Lorenzo, 2019, text copyright Lynne Marie, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Lynne Marie’s monstrously cute take on Goldilocks and the Three Bears offers up a tale of a family who would love to add another member to play, eat, and work with. When Moldilocks wanders into their empty house and makes herself at home, her discovery by Papa, Mama, and Baby answers all their “nightmares,” and they happily welcome her into their family. Full of spooky puns and funny allusions to monster culture, Marie’s storytelling will have kids howling with giggles. A gently suspenseful twist reveals the deeper layer to this fractured fairy tale—one of inclusion, belonging, and adoption.

David Rodriguez Lorenzo’s eerie and comic illustrations abound with bats, tombstones, spiderwebs, skulls, and bubbling cauldrons, and readers will love the spookily stylish décor of the Scare’s home. But the heart of the story lies in Lorenzo’s depictions of the monsters as a close family and Moldilocks as a little zombie looking for a place to call home.

Moldilocks and the Three Scares: A Zombie Tale is A frightfully fun addition to home, school, and library fractured fairy tale collections.

Ages 4 – 8

Sterling Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1454930617

Discover more about Lynne Marie and her books on her website.

To learn more about David Rodriguez Lorenzo, his books, and his art on his website.

National Adoption Month Activity

cpb - monster love maze

Monster Love! Maze

 

Help this little monster collect all the heart snacks in this printable puzzle.

 Monster Love! Maze | Monster Love Maze Solution 

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You can find Moldilocks and the Three Scares: A Zombie Tale at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

July 15 – National I Love Horses Day

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About the Holiday

Horses have been companion and work animals for people around the world since earliest times. Their beauty, strength, and swiftness are inspiring and are just a few of the reasons that horses are much-loved by kids and adults alike. Today’s holiday celebrates this special feeling people have for horses. To honor today’s holiday, read a book or watch a movie about horses or consider donating to the cause of protecting horses. There are many homeless horses who need permanent homes, too. If you have the land and means, you may even think about adopting a horse in need.

Pony in the City

By Wendy Wahman

 

At the Pony Paddock, Otis met many children and he loved them all. He gobbled up the peppermints Dinah brought him, enjoyed having his mane brushed by Daniel, and “sprang to a gallop when Mel sang out, ‘Giddy-giddy-giddyup, Otis!’” While the kids got to see where Otis lived, Otis wondered about their lives. He “wanted to know… ‘do they gallop and kick? Do they nicker and neigh? Do they ever walk on all fours?’”

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Copyright Wendy Wahman, 2017, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

The other horses in the paddock—Mosey, Whinny, and Derby—just shook their manes, stamped their hooves, and snorted when Otis started asking his questions. But Otis couldn’t stop thinking about how things were on the other side of the fence. Did kids “graze on grass and daisies?” Were their “manes brushed and braided?” And how did they sleep? Did they wear cozy blankets and stand in stalls?

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Copyright Wendy Wahman, 2017, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

One day, “saddled with questions,” Otis broke through his enclosure and headed into the city to find some children. He passed an apple orchard where he nibbled a snack, clip-clopped around a fountain, and said hello to some squirrels. He even walked by a group of horses dancing around and around to music. Suddenly, he saw them! The pasture was full of children! Everywhere, they were climbing and swinging and playing.

Otis hid behind trees and watched the kids “galloping and kicking. Nickering and neighing.” He even saw some “walking on all fours.” Otis followed a brother and sister home and was impressed with the sizes of the barns on the street. As he watched them eat their veggies at a table decorated with daisies, he realized they ate just like he did. Through the window of another barn, he saw a little girl having her mane brushed and braided, and a pair of baby twins standing in their stalls clutched their blankets and giggled to see Otis peeking at them.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-pony-in-the-city-in-the-park

Copyright Wendy Wahman, 2017, courtesy of wendywahman.com.

Otis was getting tired; it was time to go back to Pony Paddock. He clippity-clopped down the street and turned the corner. Then he turned another corner. All the barns looked the same. He trotted down sidewalk after sidewalk, getting hungrier and farther away from home. Cars honked at Otis, headlights blinded him, doormen chased him away, and statues of lions and warriors frightened him. Finally, Otis was so exhausted that he lay down under a blanket of newspapers and fell asleep.

In the morning Otis heard “Clippity, clippity.” Could it be Mosey? He heard “Cloppity, cloppity.” Did Derby or Whinny come looking for him? No! It was Dinah, David, and Mel in their cleats on the way to soccer. They were so surprised to find their friend in the big city. “The children led Otis home with a song: ‘Giddy-giddy-giddyup, Otis!’” When they reached Pony Paddock, the three fed him, brushed him and tucked him in. But did Mosey, Derby, and Whinny let Otis sleep? No! They had so many questions…, and Otis answered them all “one by one. And then some.”

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Copyright Wendy Wahman, 2017, courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Wendy Wahman’s truly clever view of children through a pony’s eyes is sure to delight readers. As Otis thinks and wonders about the children who come to ride him, he only has his own experiences to use as reference. When he ventures out into the city, he discovers that he’s right. Wahman’s imaginative interpretation of a playground, meals, haircare, cribs, and even soccer cleats creates “Ah-ha!” moments of amusement while also spurring readers to insight about bigger issues of diversity and inclusion. With a deft wit, Wahman includes plenty of verbal and visual jokes, and puns.

Wahman’s art is always distinctive, and here her smart, sophisticated, and kid-pleasing illustrations are a treat. From the title page—where, while Otis passes a hat shop, his reflection dons a red chapeaux—to the dynamic playground scene, where all types of equestrian behavior are on display to the two-page-spread, lovey blue cityscapes that map out Otis’s route,  Wahman’s collage-style images create a vibrant world.

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Copyright Wendy Wahman, 2017, courtesy of wendywahman.com

Little details enrich the story and add humor that kids will love to point out: crime scene tape crisscrosses the fence where Otis broke through, a child uses a tree for hiding at the park, just as Otis does, and the babies have horse-themed mobiles above their cribs. Readers will also enjoy following the adorable families of cats and chickens from page to page.

Pony in the City is a cute, endearing ride of a story that will enchant children. The book would make a perfect gift, especially for horse lovers, and would be a favorite on home, classroom, and library bookshelves.

Ages 3 and up

Sterling Children’s Books, 2017 | ISBN 978-1454922322

You can view a portfolio of books and art by Wendy Wahman on her website!

Gallop on over to watch this Pony in the City book trailer!

National Horse Protection Day Activity

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Just Horsing Around! Word Search Puzzle

 

There are over 200 breeds of horses in the world! You’ll find the names of twenty-five of them in this printable Just Horsing Around! Word Search Puzzle.

Just Horsing Around! Word Search PuzzleJust Horsing Around! Word Search Solution

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You can find Pony in the City at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble |Books-a-Million |IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

 

 

Picture Book Review

June 17 – It’s National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month

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About the Holiday

One of the best parts of summer is all the fresh fruit and veggies that are available in your own garden, at farmers markets, and at grocery stores. Vibrant red strawberries, raspberries, watermelon, and tomatoes; deep green lettuce and kale; and a rainbow of squash, peppers, and potatoes make cooking and eating a special treat. There’s no better way to celebrate the season than by making favorite recipes—and trying some new ones—with your favorite fruits and vegetables.

I received a copy of When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree from Sterling Children’s Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Sterling in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree

Written by Jamie L. B. Deenihan | Illustrated by Lorraine Rocha

 

Your birthday present wish list isn’t that long, but it is tech-y, full of dreams for a phone, a computer, headphones, and even a drone. But what does Grandma bring? “Surprise! It’s a…lemon tree.” Fortunately, you know your manners, so you look happy—even excited—on the outside while inside you feel more frown-y and maybe a bit cry-y as you thank her sweetly. What you don’t do is “drop it off a bridge. Tie it to your birthday balloons. Play ding dong ditch the lemon tree.”

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Image copyright Lorraine Rocha, 2019, text copyright Jaime L. B. Deenihan, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Instead, the next day you find a sunny spot for your tree, water it just enough, and protect it from danger. When winter comes, you bring it inside and keep it warm. When you see that it’s growing, you repot it. You wait and wait some more. “Once the snow melts, it’s time to bring your lemon tree back outside,” and pretty soon, you find yourself “picking lemons! Woo-Hoo!”

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Image copyright Lorraine Rocha, 2019, text copyright Jaime L. B. Deenihan, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

All those lemons are great for slicing and squeezing. But that’s a lot of lemon juice. What to do? “Gather these items: 1. Lemon juice. 2. Water. 3. A pinch (or handful) of sugar. 4. Flashy lemonade stand. Cue dazzling smile and…” you’ll have plenty of money to “finally buy exactly what you want.” You know what that is, right? Something off that wish list, or… “something you can really enjoy.” Something like that wagon full of plants and flowers you’ve bought to make a garden that “you can share with others too”—especially Grandma!

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Image copyright Lorraine Rocha, 2019, text copyright Jaime L. B. Deenihan, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Directly addressing the reader, Jamie L. B. Deenihan introduces the unthinkable gift and the inexpressible emotions it elicits with droll wit that kids will respond to with knowing giggles. But today’s crop of readers is a complex bunch, and they’ll also appreciate the value of a living, growing, giving present that they can care for and share. As the little girl tends to her lemon tree through the seasons—reading to it, transplanting it to roomier quarters, measuring it, and even naming it—Deenihan lends a layer of depth that readers will recognize from their own experiences of growing up.

At last, the lemons are ready to be picked and made into lemonade and the girl reaps the fruits of her labor in her popular lemonade stand. But these are more profound than perhaps expected as, instead of spending her cash on items from her electronics-heavy wish list, she buys a garden-load of new plants with which she transforms her neighborhood. How do the other kids react? They seem happy enough to leave their robots on the sidewalk and put away their phones to enjoy a day in nature.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-when-grandma-gives-you-a-lemon-tree-ding-dong

Image copyright Lorraine Rocha, 2019, text copyright Jaime L. B. Deenihan, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Between the front endpapers—where the neighborhood streets are empty of people, a vacant lot between apartment buildings collects trash, and a kite lies forgotten on a rooftop—and the back endpapers—where the sidewalks are full of kids, flower pots dot stoops, the vacant lot is a thriving park, and the kite soars above the buildings—an unforeseen and surprising transformation takes place. Lorraine Rocha captures the girl’s internal conflict about her gift with humorous snapshots of what she shouldn’t do with the tree and then juxtaposes them with others that show her becoming more and more invested in her little, leafy charge.

When the lemons are picked, they spill out of the bowl and dot the counter, a sunny accents to the girl’s soft-blue kitchen. The long line at her lemonade stand attests to their delicious allure. Rocha cleverly mirrors the ubiquity and sterility of electronics in her illustration of the gray Mega Store, where the only colorful element is the display of plants on sale. The final two-page spread of the lush and vibrant garden is joyously inclusive, and kids will love peering into the windows to see how the neighborhood has been brought together.

A book to spark a love of gardening, discussions on community, and a second look at all of those tech toys, When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree is highly recommended for home, classroom, and public libraries.

Ages 3 and up

Sterling Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-145492381

Discover more about Jamie L. B. Deenihan and her books on her website.

To learn more about Lorraine Rocha, her books, and her art, visit her website.

When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Sterling Children’s Books in a Twitter giveaway of:

One (1) copy of When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree written by Jamie L. B. Deenihan | illustrated by Lorraine Rocha

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from June 17 through June 23 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on June 24.

Prizing provided by Sterling Children’s Books

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

National Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-lemon-birds

Lovely Lemon Centerpiece

 

Brighten up your table with this cute birdy centerpiece! Kids will have fun making their own birds and nest with a couple of lemons and a few easy-to-find supplies.

Supplies

  • Lemons (one for each bird)
  • Googly eyes
  • Toothpicks
  • Yellow tissue paper
  • Yellow felt, fleece, or paper
  • Brown paper sandwich bag
  • Parchment paper or other light paper
  • Strong glue
  • Tape

Directions

To Make the Bird

  1. Insert the toothpick into the lemon to make the beak
  2. Glue on the eyes 
  3. Cut a length of tissue paper about 2 inches by 4 inches
  4. Fold the paper in narrow widths accordion style
  5. Pinch one end together and fan out the paper to make the tail
  6. Flatten the pinched end and glue it to the lower back of the lemon
  7. Crumple a bit of tissue paper and glue to the top of the lemon
  8. Cut small wings from the felt, fleece, or paper
  9. Glue the wings to the sides of the lemon

To Make the Nest

  1. Cut the bag open along one side and along the bottom
  2. Roll up the bag and form it into a circle, taping the ends together. (To make a larger nest tape two bags together)
  3. To make the nesting material, cut narrow strips from the parchment or light paper
  4. Fill the ring with the nesting material

Set the bird or birds in the nest

Enjoy!

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You can find When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

June 11 – National Making Life Beautiful Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was established to celebrate all of those people who make life more fun, meaningful, joyful—more beautiful—for someone else. This can be done in so many ways, from spending more time talking with someone to using your talents to make something you know a friend, family member, or coworker would love, to just giving a smile to those you meet during the day. Making someone else feel good will make life more beautiful for you too!

I received a copy of There’s Only One You from Sterling Children’s Books for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Sterling in a giveaway of the book. See details below.

There’s Only One You

Written by Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook | Illustrated by Rosie Butcher

 

Parents, teachers, and other adults with children in their lives know how special each and every one of them are. But do the kids know that? They can wonder—what makes me one-of-a-kind? Or worry—about their “knobby” knees or their “ears that stick out, that they only “smile just a bit / or laugh loud with a shriek.” You want to reassure them that “you’re different—it’s awesome, / being unique.” But sometimes the words are hard to find.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-only-one-you-girl

Image copyright Rosie Butcher, 2019, text copyright Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

That’s where There’s Only One You comes in. Through four-line rhyming stanzas, kids discover that everything about themselves from the way they feel and display their emotions to their skin color and hair to their talents and work styles is what makes them unique. Even the way they communicate is special: “When there’s something to say, / do you talk with your hands? / Do you speak with an accent / from faraway lands? / Some voices are booming, / and some, just a squeak. / Your way is the best way / of being unique.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-only-one-you-bus

Image copyright Rosie Butcher, 2019, text copyright Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Another pair of verses express the very welcome inclusion of different abilities: “You might have cool glasses / that help you to see. / A wheelchair or walker / gives mobility! / A hearing aid helps you / to hear people speak. / Listen! It’s glorious / being unique!” An individual preference that embraces both extroverts and introverts is the way kids play together—in a big group or with only one friend, often or just every now and then. The inclusiveness of the story extends to families too and expresses that each family is unique and would not be complete without their very special child or children.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-there's-only-one-you-emotions

Image copyright Rosie Butcher, 2019, text copyright Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook, 2019. Courtesy of Sterling Children’s Books.

Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook celebrate individuality in their joyous affirmation that the attributes that make someone different are the very things that should be applauded. The breadth of diversity, which includes outward appearance as well as inner emotions, personality, abilities, and family, makes this a book that any child can find themselves in and reveals how each person fits into the community as a whole. Heling and Hembrook’s sprightly rhymes and jaunty descriptions (hair can be “poofy,” “sleek,” or a “long, thick cascade”; feelings “spill out” and “lay low”) make the story a delight to read aloud.

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Rosie Butcher’s richly colored and engaging illustrations teem with action and exuberance as first one little girl is introduced as she gets ready for school and then joins a group of children and adults at the bus stop. In this two-page spread, a boy and his mother converse through sign language, an older brother holds the handles of his sibling’s wheelchair, and another sibling pair—this brother and sister red-haired and freckled—wait behind a boy with forearm crutches to board the bus. The other children that readers will follow through the story—some shy, some gregarious, some alone, and some with a friend—also congregate on the sidewalk with their parents.

Throughout the year as the kids have a party, go to the zoo, attend a play, frolic in the snow, play on the playground and more, readers see how the children, each with their unique personalities and abilities, interact together. In the final two spreads, readers meet the kids’ families, which include two dads, two moms, moms and dads, and single parents.

A beautiful way for adults to share the wonderful uniqueness of their own child or children while also instilling in them an appreciation for the uniqueness of every person, There’s Only One You would be an inspirational addition to home, classroom, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 8

Sterling Children’s Books, 2019 | ISBN 978-1454922926

Discover more about Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook and their books on their website.

There’s Only One You Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Sterling Children’s Books in a Twitter giveaway of:

One (1) copy of There’s Only One You written by Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook | illustrated by Rosie Butcher

To enter Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter and Retweet a giveaway tweet.

This giveaway is open from June 11 through June 17 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on June 18.

Prizing provided by Sterling Children’s Books

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

National Making Life Beautiful Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-initial-bookend

Initial Bookend

 

Kids can show all of their unique qualities with this easy-to-make initial decoration or bookend!

Supplies

  • Wooden letter block in the child’s first initial or both initials
  • Chalkboard paint
  • Chalk
  • Paint brush

Directions

  1. Paint the wooden letter with the chalkboard paint, let dry
  2. With the chalk, write words that your think best describe you on the letter
  3. Display your letter on your bookshelf!

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You can find There’s Only One You at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review