November 3 – National Jellyfish Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-cover-2

About the Holiday

Jellyfish may be some of the most fascinating creatures in the sea, and they are certainly among the most beautiful. Often seen in groups—called swarms, blooms, or smacks—these ancient ocean invertebrates can be transparent, yellow, red, blue, and even effervescent. Jellyfish capture prey and defend themselves by emitting toxins through painful stings. To celebrate today’s holiday, visit a local aquarium or—if you live in a climate where jellyfish are present at this time of year, head to the beach to watch them in their natural habitat.

Peanut Butter and Jellyfish

By Jarrett J. Krosoczka

 

Peanut Butter, a little seahorse, and Jellyfish were best friends who loved to explore the ocean and all its treasures together. Unfortunately, their adventures always seemed to take them past Crabby, “who would taunt as they slipped by, ‘You guys swim like humans.’” Jellyfish and Peanut Butter tried to ignore him, pretending they didn’t hear his hurtful jibes, but “Crabby was relentless. ‘You guys smell like rotten barnacles! Pee-yew!’” He compared them unflatteringly to sea slugs and his grandmother’s “run-walk shoes,” and ended with “what a bunch of bubbleheads!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-shipwreck

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Jellyfish bravely stood up to Crabby, saying, “‘driftwood and sea stones may break our bones, but names will never hurt us.’” Of course, Crabby had a retort to that which involved the fact that Jellyfish was an invertebrate. One day, as Peanut Butter and Jellyfish passed Crabby’s house on their way to the big reef, they steeled themselves for the insults to come. But all they heard was quiet – until the sounds of sobbing reached their ears.

They swam on and found Crabby trapped in a lobster pot that was being pulled to the surface of the water. He called out to them that he was scared. Jellyfish and Peanut Butter looked at each other. Was it their responsibility to help Crabby? Peanut Butter thought that his situation looked pretty serious. And Jellyfish agreed. He even had a plan.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-crabby

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

The two friends swam up to the lobster trap, and Peanut Butter wrapped his tail around a slat in the door. When he pulled it open, however, Crabby didn’t move. Peanut Butter wanted him to hurry, but Crabby had a confession to make. He couldn’t swim, and he was afraid of heights. Now, Jellyfish had an idea.

He swam to the top of the lobster trap and with all his tentacles working feverishly, he tried to untie the knot in the rope. The trap was coming closer and closer to the fisherman’s boat. Just in the nick of time, the knot loosened, but then Crabby was hurtling to the bottom of the ocean. Peanut Butter and Jellyfish raced to catch it. “They grabbed ahold and lowered it to safety.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-taunts

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Crabby felt weak as he returned to his rock, but he stuttered out a thank you to Jellyfish and Peanut Butter. Then he told them that he was sorry for all the things he had said. “Crabby may have been afraid of heights, but he was brave enough to apologize.” Crabby admitted that he may have felt jealous of all the fun Peanut Butter and Jellyfish had “exploring the open waters.” Jellyfish told Crabby that there was “plenty to explore close to the ocean floor” too. In fact, that’s where “they found their greatest treasure.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-lobster-trap

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Jarrett J. Krosoczka’s seafaring friendship story for little ones uses humor and a generosity of spirit to teach kids a lesson about empathy. Readers may giggle over Crabby’s taunts, but they will also understand the hurt they cause Peanut Butter and Jellyfish. Following this, the kindness showed by Peanut Butter and Jellyfish toward Crabby when he is in trouble then comes as a powerfully surprising message on compassion. Crabby’s willingness to admit his fears, own up to his jealousy, and apologize, as well as the trio’s growing friendship, provides many thought-provoking topics for children to consider.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-wobbly

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Krosoczka’s illustrations of the undersea world give readers plenty of details to enjoy while adorable Peanut Butter and Jellyfish take center stage. When their sweet smiles give way to wary looks, kids will know trouble is on its way. Each scene during Crabby’s entrapment and escape provide gentle suspense while demonstrating the story’s themes of understanding and acceptance. As the three explore a chest overflowing with gold in the final spread, readers can debate what the “greatest treasure” is.

Ages 3 – 7

Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2014 | ISBN 978-0375870361

Discover more about Jarrett J. Krosoczka, his books, and his art on his website.

World Jellyfish Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review--jellyfish-coloring-page

Jellyfish Coloring Page

 

Watching a jellyfish float on the ocean current can be mesmerizing! Grab your colored pencils, markers, or crayons—and maybe some glitter too—and enjoy this printable Jellyfish Coloring Page!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-cover-2

You can find Peanut Butter and Jellyfish at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

November 3 – World Jellyfish Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-cover-2

About the Holiday

Jellyfish may be some of the most fascinating creatures in the sea, and they are certainly among the most beautiful. Often seen in groups—called swarms, blooms, or smacks—these ancient ocean invertebrates can be transparent, yellow, red, blue, and even effervescent. Jellyfish capture prey and defend themselves by emitting toxins through painful stings. To celebrate today’s holiday, visit a local aquarium or—if you live in a climate where jellyfish are present at this time of year, head to the beach to watch them in their natural habitat.

Peanut Butter and Jellyfish

By Jarrett J. Krosoczka

 

Peanut Butter, a little seahorse, and Jellyfish were best friends who loved to explore the ocean and all its treasures together. Unfortunately, their adventures always seemed to take them past Crabby, “who would taunt as they slipped by, ‘You guys swim like humans.’” Jellyfish and Peanut Butter tried to ignore him, pretending they didn’t hear his hurtful jibes, but “Crabby was relentless. ‘You guys smell like rotten barnacles! Pee-yew!’” He compared them unflatteringly to sea slugs and his grandmother’s “run-walk shoes,” and ended with “what a bunch of bubbleheads!”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-shipwreck

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Jellyfish bravely stood up to Crabby, saying, “‘driftwood and sea stones may break our bones, but names will never hurt us.’” Of course, Crabby had a retort to that which involved the fact that Jellyfish was an invertebrate. One day, as Peanut Butter and Jellyfish passed Crabby’s house on their way to the big reef, they steeled themselves for the insults to come. But all they heard was quiet – until the sounds of sobbing reached their ears.

They swam on and found Crabby trapped in a lobster pot that was being pulled to the surface of the water. He called out to them that he was scared. Jellyfish and Peanut Butter looked at each other. Was it their responsibility to help Crabby? Peanut Butter thought that his situation looked pretty serious. And Jellyfish agreed. He even had a plan.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-crabby

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

The two friends swam up to the lobster trap, and Peanut Butter wrapped his tail around a slat in the door. When he pulled it open, however, Crabby didn’t move. Peanut Butter wanted him to hurry, but Crabby had a confession to make. He couldn’t swim, and he was afraid of heights. Now, Jellyfish had an idea.

He swam to the top of the lobster trap and with all his tentacles working feverishly, he tried to untie the knot in the rope. The trap was coming closer and closer to the fisherman’s boat. Just in the nick of time, the knot loosened, but then Crabby was hurtling to the bottom of the ocean. Peanut Butter and Jellyfish raced to catch it. “They grabbed ahold and lowered it to safety.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-taunts

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Crabby felt weak as he returned to his rock, but he stuttered out a thank you to Jellyfish and Peanut Butter. Then he told them that he was sorry for all the things he had said. “Crabby may have been afraid of heights, but he was brave enough to apologize.” Crabby admitted that he may have felt jealous of all the fun Peanut Butter and Jellyfish had “exploring the open waters.” Jellyfish told Crabby that there was “plenty to explore close to the ocean floor” too. In fact, that’s where “they found their greatest treasure.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-lobster-trap

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Jarrett J. Krosoczka’s seafaring friendship story for little ones uses humor and a generosity of spirit to teach kids a lesson about empathy. Readers may giggle over Crabby’s taunts, but they will also understand the hurt they cause Peanut Butter and Jellyfish. Following this, the kindness showed by Peanut Butter and Jellyfish toward Crabby when he is in trouble then comes as a powerfully surprising message on compassion. Crabby’s willingness to admit his fears, own up to his jealousy, and apologize, as well as the trio’s growing friendship, provides many thought-provoking topics for children to consider.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-peanut-butter-and-jellyfish-wobbly

Copyright Jarrett J. Krosoczka, 2014, courtesy of Knopf Books for Young Readers.

Krosoczka’s illustrations of the undersea world give readers plenty of details to enjoy while adorable Peanut Butter and Jellyfish take center stage. When their sweet smiles give way to wary looks, kids will know trouble is on its way. Each scene during Crabby’s entrapment and escape provide gentle suspense while demonstrating the story’s themes of understanding and acceptance. As the three explore a chest overflowing with gold in the final spread, readers can debate what the “greatest treasure” is.

Ages 3 – 7

Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2014 | ISBN 978-0375870361

Discover more about Jarrett J. Krosoczka, his books, and his art on his website.

World Jellyfish Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review--jellyfish-coloring-page

Jellyfish Coloring Page

 

Watching a jellyfish float on the ocean current can be mesmerizing! Grab your colored pencils, markers, or crayons—and maybe some glitter too—and enjoy this printable Jellyfish Coloring Page!

Picture Book Review

June 23 – Let It Go Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-it's-tough-to-lose-your-balloon

About the Holiday

No, this isn’t a day dedicated to re- re- re- re- re-watching that movie. It’s a day to take a step back and take stock of the feelings you’re keeping inside or the little irksome quirks that drive you crazy. Are they really worth all the stress? Today’s a day to find inner peace, make amends, or turn disadvantage into advantage.

It’s Tough to Lose Your Balloon

By Jarrett J. Krosoczka

 

Most people wake up each morning with great ideas for a having good day, but sometimes things don’t work out the way they’re planned. For kids, small mistakes, accidental mishaps, and unexpected disappointments can loom large. Frustrations and perceived unfairness can elicit tears or anger, and it’s sometimes hard to know how to comfort an unhappy or upset child.

In It’s Tough to Lose Your Balloon Jarrett Krosoczka acknowledges that sometimes bad or sad things happen, but he reveals to kids how looking at the event from a different perspective or through someone else’s eyes can bring consolation and even happiness. As the title states, it’s hard for kids to watch a balloon suddenly slip through their fingers and float away, but imagining all the other people who will see it and smile can help. Having a picnic on the beach when the unthinkable happens? “It’s sad to drop your sandwich in the sand…but it’ll make some seagulls very happy.” And you know it will make you laugh to watch those crazy guys swooping, diving, and squawking over that now-crunchy snack.

The idea of sharing hurts with others to create a new scenario or a different kind of enjoyment while forming closer bonds is another positive way to turn disappointments into teachable moments that benefit all. As most kids know “it’s never fun when you break a toy…” but with a upbeat attitude they can have “fun fixing it with Grandpa.”

Wet shoes? Melting Ice-cream cone? Scraped knee or new baby sitter? In Jarrett Krosoczka’s hands these letdowns can lead to new freedom, innovation, distinction, and joyful experiences. It’s Tough to Lose Your Balloon can help anyone see “disaster” in a whole new light!

Krosoczka’s illustrations ingeniously depict the way an unexpected mishap or disappointing moment can make someone feel—alone, exposed, and vulnerable. Left-hand pages present the problem while the right-hand page shows the crestfallen child in full color on a black-and-white sketched background. The positive transformation becomes a two-spread, full-color of happy pride and fun abandon. Life can be full of little bumps in the road, keeping a copy of It’s Tough to Lose Your Balloon on the shelf can help smooth the way.

Ages 3 – 7

Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2015 | ISBN 978-0385754798

Visit Jarrett J. Krosoczka’s Website to see more of his books and discover fun activities!

Let It Go Day Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-worry-buddy-craft

Worry Buddy

 

Sometimes worries don’t seem as bad when they are shared with someone else or to at least set aside for awhile. With this craft you can make a friend to help lesson worries, disappointments, fears, and anxieties. And it’s pretty good at hugs too. Older children may like to create this as a sewing project, while younger kids can make it easily with fabric glue. Make your Worry Buddy as unique as you are!

Supplies

  • Fleece or felt in different colors
  • Buttons, two larger in the same color and two smaller in a different color
  • Fiber fill
  • Fabric glue or thread
  • Paper
  • Pen or pencil

Directions

To Make the Body

  1. Cut a 16-inch piece of fleece
  2. Fold the fleece in half
  3. Glue the sides together (older children may enjoy sewing the sides together with simple straight stitches)
  4. Leave the top open
  5. Turn the body inside out
  6. Fill the body with fiber fill

To Make the Hair

  1. Cut a 5-inch piece of fleece or felt
  2. Fold the fleece or felt in half
  3. Glue or sew the folded fleece into the opening in the body
  4. Cut the fleece or felt in ¼-inch strips across the top

To Make the Face

  1. Glue one set of larger and smaller buttons together, repeat with the other set
  2. Glue or sew the buttons to the top part of the body
  3. Cut a nose and mouth out of fleece or felt
  4. Glue or sew the nose and mouth to the face

To make the pocket

  1. Cut a 5-inch piece of felt in the shape of a square-bottom or rounded bottom pocket
  2. Fold down an inch of the top
  3. Glue or sew the pocket to the middle of the body

To share problems with the Worry Buddy, write worries or fears on a slip of paper and put them in the Worry Buddy’s pocket. Your Buddy will keep those problems so you don’t have to.