May 4 – It Is (Not) Perfect Book Tour Launch

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About the Holiday

A new book in a favorite series is always something for readers to celebrate. Today, I’m thrilled to be launching the book tour for the fifth installment in Anna Kang’s and Christopher Weyant’s beloved You Are (Not) Small series, starring two fuzzy friends who take on life’s lessons with humor and friendship. We’re also beginning Get Caught Reading Month, which promotes the fun of reading for all ages and encourages people to set aside a special time each day to read. To join in the fun, you can take a picture of yourself reading and share it using #GetCaughtReading. Why not get started with today’s book?

I received a copy of It Is (Not) Perfect from Two Lions for review consideration. All opinions are my own. I’m happy to be teaming with Blue Slip Media and Two Lions ina giveaway of the book. See details below.

It Is (Not) Perfect

Written by Anna Kang | Illustrated by Christopher Weyant

 

Two fuzzy friends are at the beach, building a sandcastle. It has two bucket-shaped turrets, a trio of shell decorations, and a low wall around it. The orange friend happily declares, “It is perfect!” But his purple companion looks at the castle askance and says, “It is not perfect.” If only it had flags then it would be perfect. But for the orange fuzzy creature, the flags only emphasize how short the castle is.

With a little extra sand patted into a cone on top of each turret, the castle is now perfect. Until…. Two beachgoers passing by think the castle could use some improvement. The blue fuzzy one gives it a good examination and decides the wall “is too small.” Orange fuzzy and purple fuzzy look on with disappointment and distress. They bring in more sand and dig furiously until the blue fuzzy judge finds it to be “perfect!”

But not so fast. Other beachcombers have more suggestions. Lots of suggestions. Purple fuzzy and orange fuzzy go to work. They dig, they sculp, they decorate. And when the flag is finally ploinked down on the tallest tower, everyone shouts in jubilation, “IT IS PERFECT!” Everyone gathers around the castle to take a picture just as… “SPLASH! CLICK!”… the castle is reduced to little more than a mound. But it’s nothing that a little patting, a couple of shells, a seaweed flag, and two delicious rainbow snow cones can’t make “Perfect. Truly.”

The latest book in Anna Kang’s and Christopher Weyant’s best-selling series examines a difficult conundrum: when is a work of art perfect? As the orange and purple fuzzy friends put the finishing touches on their sandcastle, happy in its perfection, niggling doubts come to the fore, causing them to reconsider if their creation couldn’t be just a little more…perfect. When others begin chiming in with their suggestions to make the castle bigger and “better,” these two friends go to work to improve it. While the result is a sensational, award-worthy spectacle, when a wave wipes it out, the two friends are just as happy with their original effort. For kids who may struggle with their inner critic or yielding to others’ opinions, this story humorously encourages them to stay true to their vision.

Anna Kang’s sparse text, conveyed entirely through short sentences of realistic dialogue, is funny and relatable as the crowd grows bigger and each person has their own suggestion for improvement. Readers may want to jump in themselves and talk about how they would build their own sandcastle. Kang’s superb storytelling is paired with Christopher Weyant’s expressive characters to create a fast-paced and entertaining page-turner.

As each iteration of the sandcastle brings smiles and then furrowed brows of doubt to the two fuzzy characters, readers will recognize feelings they may have about things they create or do. Add in the beachgoers, and the issue gets even more muddied. One enormous voice in the crowd will have kids giggling and wanting to hear it again and again. Weyant’s images of the purple and orange fuzzy friends furiously digging and patting, planning and decorating under the watchful eye of the group ramps up the suspense for the final reveal.

The rogue wave is sure to bring cringes and cries of “Oh no!,” but the resulting photo will elicit laughs. As the people disperse after the castle is destroyed, kids will understand that their interest was only fleeting while the orange and purple fuzzy characters’ friendship is forever. The final pages provide a sweet sense of satisfaction. While the final castle was a thing of beauty, it’s momentary perfection is nothing compared to the perfect day the two fuzzy characters spend together.

A delightful book for emergent and beginning readers to enjoy on their own as well as for dramatic read-alouds, It Is (Not) Perfect is a must for home, classroom, and public library collections.

Ages 3 – 7 

Two Lions, 2020 | ISBN 978-1542016629

Anna Kang and Christopher Weyant are the creators of Theodor Seuss Geisel Award winner You Are (Not) Small as well as series titles That’s (Not) Mine, I Am (Not) Scared, and We Are (Not) Friends. They also wrote and illustrated Eraser, Can I Tell You a Secret?, and Will You Help Me Fall Asleep? Christopher’s work can also be seen in The New Yorker, and his cartoons are syndicated worldwide. This husband-and-wife team lives in New Jersey with their two daughters and their rescue dog.

You can connect with Anna Kang on 

Her website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

You can connect with Christopher Weyant on

His website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

It Is (Not) Perfect Giveaway

I’m excited to partner with Two Lions in a giveaway of:

One (1) copy of It Is (Not) Perfect, written by Anna Kang | illustrated by Christopher Weyant

To enter:

  • Follow me @CelebratePicBks on Twitter
  • Retweet a giveaway tweet
  • Bonus: Reply with something you think is perfect and get an extra entry. Each reply earns one more entry.

This giveaway is open from May 4 through May 11 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on May 12.

Prizing provided by Two Lions

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

It Is (Not) Perfect Book Tour Activity

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Personalized Painted Pail

 

A trip to the beach isn’t complete without a pail to make a sandcastle with or to collect shells, seaweed, sea glass, or other things in. But why should all the cool stuff be on the inside? With this craft you can decorate your pail to show your unique personality!

Supplies

  • Plastic or metal pail
  • Craft paint in various colors
  • Crystal Clear Acrylic Coating, for multi-surface use
  • Paint brush

Directions

  1. Paint designs on the pail
  2. When paint is dry spray with acrylic coating to set paint
  3. Let dry

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You can find It Is (Not) Perfect at these booksellers. The book will be released on May 12. It is available for preorder.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

May 2 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

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About the Holiday

The Get Caught Reading campaign was initiated in 1999 by the Association of American Publishers with the idea to promote literacy and language development through reading to children and encouraging them to read on their own. Research shows that early experience with language and reading stimulates a child’s brain and gives them an advantage in learning and school. As part of the campaign, celebrities, dignitaries, and even fictional characters are pictured book-in-hand and enjoying reading. Posters of these readers are available for schools, libraries, and other organizations, and the excitement of reading also takes over social media all month long. To celebrate this holiday, make sure you stock up your shelves with new and favorite books and get caught reading!

We Are (Not) Friends

Written by Anna Kang | Illustrated by Christopher Weyant

 

This big, brown, fuzzy bear and little, purple, fuzzy bear have been through a lot together—disagreements, fear, problems with sharing—but nothing has prepared them for the blue, fluffy rabbit who bounces onto the scene and into their friendship. When the newcomer asks to join them just as they’re about to explore the stuff in the big, green trunk, Big Bear is all for it, but Little Bear is wary. Rabbit pulls two canes from the trunk and, handing one to Big Bear, suggests they perform a duet. Big Bear’s in, but Little Bear feels left out.

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2019, text copyright Anna Kang, 2019. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Big Bear and Rabbit do a tap routine in perfect sync. Then Little Bear shows his stuff with flying feet that aren’t exactly in rhythm. When they all toss their hats in the air, Big Bear and Rabbit neatly catch theirs on their heads while Little Bear’s bonks him on the noggin and bounces off. Little Bear storms off and comes back with a fan so powerful it blows Rabbit’s hat nearly off the page. “What? It was getting hot,” Little Bear replies to Big Bear’s questioning look.

When Little Bear wants to “play dinosaur hunters,” Big Bear looks for their new friend. Little Bear, for his part, denies all knowledge of who he’s talking about. “Our friend—” Big Bear begins to explain, but Little Bear counters “We are friends. We are not friends with—” But then Rabbit’s back and a game of dinosaur hunters gets underway without Little Bear.

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2019, text copyright Anna Kang, 2019. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Little Bear then has a brainstorm that Rabbit likes, and a new duo is formed that doesn’t include Big Bear. Now Big Bear’s feeling left out. Rabbit decides they can combine both games and proclaims Big Bear a dinosaur. “Yeah! Attack, T. rex!” Little Bear urges. Big Bear lets out a tiny roar, then a bigger roar, and finally a huge “ROAR!!!” at which Rabbit Whumps him over the head with a net. Big Bear begins to cry and shouts “WE ARE NOT FRIENDS!!!”

Shaken, the two quiet down and look on sadly. Little Bear gazes at Big Bear and understands. He lays his paw on Big Bear’s arm and clarifies: “We are best friends.” And Bear offers, “And this is our new friend?” That’s exactly it! With everyone satisfied, they’re all happy playing spies, until….”

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2019, text copyright Anna Kang, 2019. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Anna Kang continues to develop the relationship between her sweet friends in this funny and heartwarming story about how to make room for new buddies in a well-established relationship. Kang perfectly captures the fluctuating dynamics that occur when a new person joins a group and through honest dialogue portrays the hurt feelings and misunderstandings that can happen while children play together. Little Bear’s sensitivity to Big Bear’s feelings strengthens their friendship while allowing it to grow. The story gives adults and children an opportunity to discuss this complex challenge that’s a common part of growing up.

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2019, text copyright Anna Kang, 2019. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Christopher Weyant’s lovable and beloved fuzzy friends are joined by an equally cute character who brings new energy and ideas into the relationship between Big Bear and Little Bear but also dismay. Weyant portrays the actions that lead to hurt feelings clearly through images of Big Bear and Rabbit dancing perfectly in synch while Little Bear flounders and then Little Bear and Rabbit building a car that has no room for Big Bear. The characters’ changing facial expressions also provide distinct emotional clues that lead young readers to recognize and empathize with each friend’s experience.

A touching ride through the sometimes-choppy waters of friendship, We Are (Not) Friends reassures young readers that there’s room enough for all. The book is a must for fans of the series and a great place to start if you have not yet been introduced to these adorable characters. We Are (Not) Friends will be a much-asked-for addition to home, classroom, and public library shelves.

Ages 3 – 7

Two Lions, 2019 | ISBN 978-1542044288

Discover more about Anna Kang and her books on her website.

To learn more about Christopher Weyant, his books, and his art, visit his website.

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

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Catch a Book! Maze

 

One boy has a whole stack of books to share with his friends! Can you help him through this printable Catch a Book! Maze? Here’s the Solution!

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You can find We Are (Not) Friends at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

 

 

April 15 – National Rubber Eraser Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday marks the date in 1770 when Joseph Priestly developed a vegetable gum that could remove pencil marks. He named the substance rubber. In the same year Edward Nairne created the first marketed rubber eraser. Erasers became more durable when Charles Goodyear discovered vulcanization in 1839. In 1858, Hyman Lipman received a patent for a pencil with an eraser at the end. But how did people fix their mistakes before rubber erasers? Wax was a popular material, and if you didn’t have that? Crustless bread did a good job of rubbing out mistakes—and hunger!

Eraser

Written by Anna Kang | Illustrated by Christopher Weyant

 

The little pink eraser sporting two side ponytails looks at the math problem Pencil has just completed. She clears her throat and motions to the 11 under the 4 + 5 line. Pencil chuckles uncomfortably and says she was just testing Eraser. By the time Pen comes around to grade the work, Eraser has cleaned up the mess and the correct answer is proudly displayed. Pencil smiles, taking all the credit for the perfect score she receives.

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2018, text copyright Anna Kang. Courtesy of Two Lions.

At the lunch table, all of Pencil’s friends—Pen, Highlighter, Marker, a couple of paint brushes, and a few crayons—congratulate him on getting an A+ on the test. Eraser overhears them and says, “Everyone thinks Pencil and her friends are the creative ones. It’s not fair.” On the other side of the lunch room, Tape and Glue are holding a jam session and everyone’s singing along. And then there’s Paper, whom everyone loves, and Scissors, who gets respect because “she’s just kind of scary.”

Eraser wonders what she brings to the table when all she does is “take things away.” Her friends think she does a good job of making everyone look good, but Eraser feels like she is more than just the clean-up crew. After lunch the teacher calls everyone to gather around for a science project meeting. When Eraser starts moving to join the group, Highlighter stops her and tells her this meeting is only for creative types only.

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2018, text copyright Anna Kang. Courtesy of Two Lions.

That night Eraser is busy rub, rub, rubbing across a sheet of paper. The next morning she presents her version of the science project—a drawing made entirely out of eraser shavings. Ruler and Pencil Sharpener love it, but when Glue comes near to check it out, he sneezes, sending the shavings everywhere.

Later, everything’s beginning to come together, but when Pencil sees Eraser trying to help, she and Highlighter joke that she can’t make anything but a mess. Everyone laughs. Eraser has had enough. She packs her bag and asks Ruler and Sharpener to launch her far away. She flies through the air and lands in the wastepaper basket.

When the crumpled papers filling the basket see her, they greet her as a hero and tell her they love her work and are big fans. She can’t believe it. They go on to explain that they’re all first drafts and without them and her “there’d be nothing to hang on the fridge door.” Suddenly, she gets it. She is creative. She “creates second chances.” “Mistakes,” they all agree, “make us great!”

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2018, text copyright Anna Kang. Courtesy of Two Lions.

Meanwhile there are plenty of mistakes going on over on the desk. At the same time, Pencil realizes that she hasn’t checked her math homework and Pen is coming around to grade it. Pen marks a big red X at each of Pencil’s answers and gives her an F. Pencil is so upset that she scribbles all over the newly painted science fair picture.

Just in the nick of time, Eraser comes flying in on a paper airplane, followed by a fleet of planes carrying first drafts. Glue, Ruler, Sharpener, and the rest cheer and tell Eraser that they’ve missed her. Pencil approaches, apologizes for her behavior, and asks if Eraser will help her. “You bet!” Eraser answers. The next day, the Rainforest Science Project looks amazing—especially with the big A+ on it. At lunch everyone celebrates and talks proudly about their role in the project. And Pencil makes a toast to her partner Eraser.

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Image copyright Christopher Weyant, 2018, text copyright Anna Kang. Courtesy of Two Lions.

In her heartfelt story, Anna Kang reminds kids that every member of a group has important contributions to make and that making mistakes is part of the creative process. Realistic dialogue and honest emotions coupled with clearly expressive characters, make this a story that readers will identify with and learn from. Sprinkled with puns—and a couple of Kumbaya moments that adults will appreciate—Eraser strikes just the right tone of humor and camaradarie that will make it a favorite for story times.

Christopher Weyant brings all the energy and enthusiasm of a classroom to the desktop on which adorable Eraser and her friends are doing homework and creating a science project. Kids will love seeing familiar antics of a typical day played out by expressive, funny, and creative writing and drawing tools.

Eraser is a sparkling story to share during writing workshops or before any creative project to reinforce the idea that mistakes and do-overs are part of the process and lead to a better finished product.

Ages 3 – 7

Two Lions, 2018 | ISBN 978-1503902589

Discover more about Anna Kang and her books on her website

To learn more about Christopher Weyant, his books, and his art, visit his website.

It’s no mistake to check out this Eraser book trailer!

National Rubber Eraser Day Activity

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Fun with Eraser! Coloring Pages

 

You can have fun over and over again with these printable coloring pages!

Dancing with Eraser and PencilEraser and Friends at School 

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You can find Eraser at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review