April 27 – National Tell a Story Day

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About the Holiday

Today’s holiday was established to celebrate the art of storytelling. Historically, oral storytelling was the way people handed down knowledge, philosophies, and experiences from one generation to the next. Today, while National Storytelling Day highlights oral storytelling, the day also encourages families to get together and have fun remembering and sharing family tales, traditions, history, and events. Reading together is another wonderful way to discover your own stories and those of others around the world. Today’s book reveals a story every reader should know – the story of what perhaps is America’s most recognized symbol and the children who saved her.  

Thanks to Scholastic Press and Blue Slip Media for sending me a copy of Let Liberty Rise! for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own. I’m excited to be teaming with them on a giveaway for the book. See details below.

Let Liberty Rise! How America’s Schoolchildren Helped Save the Statue of Liberty

Written by Chana Stiefel | Illustrated by Chuck Groenink

 

America was about to celebrate her 100th birthday and the people of France were creating a huge gift to commemorate the two countries’ friendship. “It was an enormous statue — one of the largest the world was yet to see! Her name was Liberty” and she symbolized freedom. To be shipped across the ocean, Liberty had to be disassembled and packed into 214 crates. In the spring of 1885 the ship Isère began her voyage with her precious cargo.

It took a month for Isère to reach New York’s Bedloe Island, and soon the crates were waiting to be unloaded. “But a colossal problem had been brewing.” To hold the weight of the statue, the Americans were building a pedestal for Liberty to stand on, and it was only half built. To finish it would “cost more than $100,000 to complete. (That’s $2.6 million today…)” and no one, it seemed, wanted to help. “Without a pedestal, Lady Liberty would never rise.” Lady Liberty needed a champion.

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Image copyright Chuck Groenink, 2021, text copyright Chana Stiefel, 2021. Courtesy of Scholastic.

When Joseph Pulitzer, owner of the New York World newspaper and an immigrant himself, heard about the problem, he was furious. He wrote a small article for the newspaper appealing  not to the millionaires of America but to the common people and asking them to give money to finish the pedestal. He also offered to print the name of every person who contributed, no matter how much they gave. “The next day pennies, nickels, dimes, and dollars poured in.”

Even schoolchildren sent what they could. Kids donated money they had saved to go to special events or for special treats, they made up Pedestal Fund clubs, and wrote letters saying how proud they were to give. Schools from around the country raised as much as they could—and whether it was $105.07 from New Jersey, $10.00 from a charity group, or $1.35 from a kindergarten class in Iowa, every bit helped.

“Finally, on August 11, 1885, the World’s headline read: ‘One Hundred Thousand Dollars!’” From across the nation, 120,000 people had donated money to make sure Lady Liberty had a pedestal to stand on. As soon as the pedestal was finished, work began on constructing Lady Liberty piece by piece. On October 28, 1886 the inauguration of Lady Liberty was celebrated with festivities and a parade. Now everyone could see America’s monument to “freedom and hope,” and the Statue of Liberty welcomed the immigrants who sailed to our shores in steamships from around the world. Today, Lady Liberty still stands “thanks to the contributions of people all across America — and children just like you.”

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Image copyright Chuck Groenink, 2021, text copyright Chana Stiefel, 2021. Courtesy of Scholastic.

Extensive back matter includes a timeline of Lady Liberty’s history from 1865 to 2020, more facts about the Statue of Liberty, resources for further reading and research, and photographs from the original construction of Lady Liberty and the pedestal as well as the inauguration celebration and photographs of sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi and Joseph Pulitzer.

Chana Stiefel raises children’s empowerment, excitement, and pride what they can achieve in her uplifting true story of how children were instrumental in building the foundation for the Statue of Liberty. Her straightforward storytelling shines with her conversational style and size and monetary comparisons that clearly demonstrate the enormity of the fundraising accomplishment. The inclusion of quotes from children’s letters at the time will impress and charm today’s kids. As children today become the champions of so many causes they care about, this connection to their historical peers will bring cheer, satisfaction, and inspiration.

Chuck Groenink’s delightful mixed media illustrations inform readers on every page about the time period surrounding, the personalities involved in, and the scale of the project to build the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty. As Groenink portrays the creation of the statue in France, children can see the size of the sculpture in proportion to the men working on it. His depiction of the French harbor town from which the Isère launches is charming, and the process of offloading the crates onto barges that deliver them to the island reveals the meticulous procedures necessary to ensure the statue’s safe arrival.

So when readers turn the pages to discover the scowling faces of adults who didn’t want to pay for the pedestal—and even wanted to send the statue back—they may be shocked. The images of kids donating their hard-earned change, knitting socks to sell, sacrificing candy and trips to the circus, and creating special clubs to raise money will remind charitable readers that they are carrying on a proud tradition to make a difference to their community and their country. A vertical two-page spread of the Statue of Liberty standing over the harbor with fireworks flashing behind her, followed by a view of Lady Liberty as seen through the eyes of immigrants coming to America’s shores are two illustrations that are as inspirational as they get.

A noble, inspiring story about the hope and charity offered by our country, our symbol of freedom, and our children, Let Liberty Rise! is a must-read for all children and should be included in every home, classroom, and public library collection.

Ages 6 – 9

Scholastic Press, 2021 | ISBN 978-1338225884

Chana Stiefel is the author of more than 25 books for kids. She hails from sunny South Florida and now lives in New Jersey, just a ferry ride away from the Statue of Liberty. Chana loves visiting schools and libraries as well as sharing her passion for reading and writing with children. She earned a master’s degree in Science, Health, and Environmental Reporting from New York University. To learn more, visit Chana at chanastiefel.com. You can connect with Chana on Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Chuck hails from an overgrown village among the peat bogs in the north of the Netherlands, where he spent his formative years climbing trees, drawing, reading, and cycling. He attended the Artez Institute of Visual Arts in Kampen, graduating from the Department of Illustration in 2004. He now resides in Valatie, New York, with his wife, dog, and two cats. Visit Chuck at chuckgroenink.com and on Instagram.

Watch the Let Liberty Rise! Book Trailer!

Let Liberty Rise! Giveaway

I’m happy to be teaming with Scholastic Press and Blue Slip Media in a giveaway of:

  • One (1) copy of Let Liberty Rise! by Chana Stiefel | illustrated by Chunk Groenink
  • Bookplate signed by Chana Stiefel

To enter:

This giveaway is open from April 27 to May 3 and ends at 8:00 p.m. EST.

A winner will be chosen on May 4. 

Prizing provided by Scholastic Press for Young Readers and Blue Slip Media.

Giveaway open to U.S. addresses only. | No Giveaway Accounts 

Tell a Story Day Activity

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Let Liberty Rise! Educator’s Guide

 

Download this six-page educator’s guide and enjoy the cross-curricular activities that are great for classrooms, homeschoolers, or just having family fun.

Let Liberty Rise! Educator’s Guide

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You can find Let Liberty Rise! at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review 

April 26 – It’s National Park Week and Arbor Day

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About the Holidays

This week the country celebrates National Park Week, a collaboration between the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, to honor our national treasures. During the week, people are encouraged to visit their local parks or take a trip to a new park and enjoy all it has to offer. Each day of the week has a special theme. Today’s is Friendship Friday and it commemorates all the organizations and groups who work to protect the parks. To discover national parks near you and discover their stories as well as to learn more about the week and how to help out all year round, visit the National Park Foundation website and the National Park Service website.

Today is also Arbor Day, a national celebration of trees that began as a campaign by J. Morton Sterling and his wife after they moved from Michigan to Nebraska in 1854. Morton advocated for the planting of trees not only for their beauty but as windbreaks for crops on the state’s flat farmland, to keep soil from washing away, as building materials, and for shade. In 1872, Morton proposed a tree-planting day to take place on April 10. On that day nearly one million trees were planted in Nebraska. The idea was made official in 1874, and soon, other states joined in. In 1882 schools began taking part. Today, most states celebrate Arbor Day either today or on a day more suited for their growing season. To learn about events in your area, find activities to download, and more, visit the Arbor Day Foundation website.

I received a copy of If I Were a Park Ranger from Albert Whitman and Company for review consideration. All opinions are my own. 

If I Were a Park Ranger

Written by Catherine Stier | Illustrated by Patrick Corrigan

If you love trees, animals, and all the beauty of nature, you may think about being a park ranger in one of the United States national parks. How would you get there? By studying “wildlife biology, conservation, or education” in college. Historian William Stegner called national parks “America’s ‘best idea.’” Being a park ranger means you’d be part of a proud history of people who have cared for the “country’s most beautiful, historic, and unique areas.”

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Image copyright Patrick Corrigan, 2019, text copyright Catherine Stier, 2019. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Who are some of these people? Stephen Mather and Horace Albright were the first directors of the National Park Service, Captain Charles Young was “the first African American superintendent of a national park,” and Gerard Baker “brought Native American heritage and perspectives to the parks.” There are also writers, like Marjory Stoneman Douglas ,and artists, like John Muir and Ansel Adams, who shared the grandeur of the parks.

Park rangers work in some of the most exciting places in the country—in caves, deserts, and mountains and near volcanos or the sea shore. And that’s just the beginning! Ships, homes, battlefields, and monuments are also part of the National Park System. As a park ranger, you would protect the animals, plants, and buildings, you might work with scientists, or archaeologists, and you would help visitors gain new perspectives. How would you do that?

You’d “be a great storyteller.” As part of your job, you’d “learn about the natural history, the human history, and the legends” of you park so you “could share those tales…” and maybe “a few spooky campfire stories too.” You’d also learn all about the animals and landmarks of your park so you could provide interesting tours.

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Image copyright Patrick Corrigan, 2019, text copyright Catherine Stier, 2019. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Rangers are always on the lookout for fires, bad weather, or visitors who require help and alert emergency services when they’re needed. But rangers don’t spend all of their time outdoors. Sometimes they spend time inside using “computers to design exhibits, make maps, write articles, and keep track of endangered animal populations” or keep the park’s website updated. Park rangers are also invited to talk to students in schools and for organizations.

If you were a park ranger, you would make a big impact. Your park would be “cleaner and safer,” the “animals living there would be stronger and healthier,” and visitors might “experience something astonishing…a moment that could happen nowhere else in the world. A moment they’d remember forever” all because of you!

An Author’s Note reveals other riches of the National Park System, including STEM research, creative programs, artifacts and primary source materials, and more as well as a discussion on the education and various roles of rangers and a link where kids can find out about becoming a junior ranger at many parks.

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Image copyright Patrick Corrigan, 2019, text copyright Catherine Stier, 2019. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Catherine Stier’s inspiring look at the role of a ranger in the National Park Service takes readers from shore to shore and shows them the exciting and diverse jobs that are part of a ranger’s day. Stier’s use of the first-person point of view empowers readers to see themselves as a ranger protecting the treasures of the park and sharing them with visitors. Her straightforward storytelling is full of details readers will love about the duties of a park ranger and the parks themselves. Her stirring ending swells the heart. It’s certain to plant the seed of interest in jobs within the National Park Service as well as in planning a vacation trip to one of these beautiful areas.

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Image copyright Patrick Corrigan, 2019, text copyright Catherine Stier, 2019. Courtesy of Albert Whitman & Company.

Through vibrant snapshots and two-page spreads, Patrick Corrigan transports readers to twenty-five national parks, including Redwood National Park, California; Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park; Petroglyph National Monument, New Mexico; Acadia National Park, Maine; and Great Smoky Mountains National Park. To immerse young readers in the story, the rangers are depicted as diverse children helping visitors, giving talks, protecting animals, translating petroglyphs, giving tours, calling firefighters, and even brushing dirt from an unearthed animal skull. In one image a ranger gives a flashlight tour of Mammoth Cave National Park to a girl who uses a wheelchair, and in another a ranger uses sign language to describe the beauty of her park. Children will want to linger over the pages to take in all the details and will be moved to learn more about each park.

Sure to spark expressions of “ooh,” “ahh,” and “I’d like to do that!,” If I Were a Park Ranger makes an inspiring addition to classroom geography and nature lessons and would be a terrific addition to home libraries for kids who love nature and travel and would like to explore future possibilities.

Ages 5 – 9

Albert Whitman and Company, 2019 | ISBN 978-0807535455

Discover more about Catherine Stier and her books on her website.

To learn more about Patrick Corrigan, his books, and his art, visit his website.

National Park Week Activity

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Majestic Parks Coloring Pages

You may not be able to visit all of these parks, but you can still enjoy their beauty with these printable coloring pages!

Mesa Verde National Park | Gates of the Arctic National Park | Hawaii Volcanoes National Park | Biscayne National Park

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You can find If I Were a Park Ranger at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review