May 26 – It’s Get Caught Reading Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-boats-are-busy-cover

About the Holiday

Get Caught Reading Month was established in 1999 by the Association of American Publishers to encourage people of all ages to read more. Authors, illustrators, celebrities, athletes, and others participate by sharing pictures of themselves reading an old favorite or new book on social media. Schools, libraries, bookstores, and community venues hold special programs throughout the month. For more information and to find resources, visit the Get Caught Reading website.

Boats Are Busy

By Sara Gillingham

 

In Sara Gillingham’s beautiful collection of the various kinds of boats that sail our lakes and oceans, she introduces kids to ships, their purpose, and the meaning of maritime flags that captains use to communicate with each other. First up is the Tugboat that helps other ships when they cannot move on their own. Next is the Sailboat. “Sailboats are patient. They wait for the wind to blow their sails and move them in the right direction. If it’s a windy day, they’ll sail away!”

Cargo Ships are the strong movers of the sea that transport goods from place to place and country to country. The crews of Fishing Boats catch delicious food for us to eat. They have lots of equipment on board to bring fish in. The Aircraft Carrier’s so large, they are “like floating airports” where planes take off and land. Some boats even move underwater. These are Submarines. “Submarines are sneaky…. Shhhhh, they’re hiding!”

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon.

A long time ago wooden Clipper Ships sailed the seas carrying goods and even pirates. Today, they are  as “floating classrooms.” These Research Vessels “are made for studying different parts of the ocean so that we can understand more about fish or plants or the bottom of the sea.” Many people like to spend their vacation on the water on a Cruise Ship. These enormous ships are like little cities, with bedrooms, restaurants, pools, games, and places to relax.”

Readers also learn about Car Carriers, Ferries, Oil Tankers, Police Boats, Rescue Boats, and Diving Boats. Each boat also flies a maritime flag so that children can learn which ones mean yes and no, signal left and right turns, warn of fishing nets or divers in the water, direct others to stop and listen, say Hello, warn of dangerous cargo, indicate the boat is not moving, signal reversing, tell other boats to stop, and tells that the boat will soon be leaving port.

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Copyright Sara Gillingham, 2018, courtesy of Phaidon.

Sara Gillingham’s welcoming and conversational descriptions will excite kids who love modes of transportation and/or the sea as they learn a few facts about each boat. Her engaging rhythm and well-chosen vocabulary will appeal to a wide range of readers. The text elevates her target audience, understanding toddlers’ and preschoolers’ thirst for learning. After reading Boats Are Busy, kids are sure to happily recognize different boats and be able to recount their new knowledge. Gillingham’s boldly colored pages spotlight each boat with realistic details that clearly show young readers its shape and purpose. Crew members and passengers working and enjoying each vessel also demonstrate the scale of the boats.

Docking Boats Are Busy on home or classroom bookshelves will delight little ones. This sturdy board book also makes a terrific take-along for the beach and other outings.

Ages 2 – 5

Phaidon, 2018 | ISBN 978-0714876719

Discover more about Sara Gillingham, her books, and her art on her website.

Get Caught Reading Month Activity

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Tugs to the Rescue! Matching Puzzle

 

The ships below need help. Match each tug to a ship in this printable Tugs to the Rescue! Matching Puzzle?

 

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