April 26 – National Audubon Day

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-birds-explore-their-extraordinary-world-cover

About the Holiday

Today’s holiday honors John James Audubon, who was born on this date in 1785. Audubon was a French-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter who traveled across America, documenting the birds he found in his detailed illustrations of them in their natural habitats. Audubon’s greatest work was The Birds of America, which is considered one of the finest ornithological works ever completed. This book contains more than 700 North American bird species with 435 hand-colored, life-size prints of 497 bird species. The Audubon Society is a far-reaching organization dedicated to conservation and education and is actively involved in issues that threaten bird populations. To learn more about the Audubon Society and its work, visit the organization’s website.

To celebrate today’s holiday, take a walk in your area or even your backyard and take special note of the birds you see. If you’d like to attract more birds to your backyard, consider hanging a bird feeder or making a temporary feeder from a pinecone, peanut butter, and seed as in the activity below. 

Thanks to Bloomsbury Children’s Books for sending me a copy of Birds: Explore their extraordinary world for review consideration. All opinions on the book are my own.

Birds: Explore their extraordinary world

Written by Miranda Krestovnikoff | Illustrated by Angela Harding

 

To love birds is to marvel over everything about them from their smooth gliding flight and beautiful songs to their colorful plumage and intricate nests that protect fragile eggs from the elements and predators. With a stunning number of species, birds are found around the world and living in every kind of climate. In Miranda Krestovnikoff and Angela Harding’s eye-catching compendium, readers learn about seven families of birds – birds of prey, seabirds, freshwater birds, flightless birds, tropical birds, tree dwellers, and passerines. 

Each chapter opens with general facts on the behavior, anatomical features, and habitat that determine the order in which a bird is categorized. Integrated with this information are descriptions of specific birds within the order. In the section on Birds of Prey, for instance, readers learn about sparrowhawks; fish-eating ospreys; and golden eagles, which can “spot a rodent from over a mile away and a rabbit from nearly double that distance.” Children also learn about extreme birds of prey: the fastest, largest, smallest, tallest, and baldest and how their distinctive feature helps them thrive. Kids also discover how they “can tell when each species of owl prefers to hunt by looking at the color of its eyes.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-birds-explore-their-extraordinary-world-owls

Image copyright Angela Harding, 2020, text copyright Miranda Krestovnikoff, 2020. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

The next chapter takes readers to coastal areas to learn about the seabirds that scour the water from the sky, searching for food and waders, that are found along the water’s edge and “feed on the variety of high-protein invertebrates that lie hidden in the mud.” Children learn about the birds that populate warmer waters, such as blue-footed boobies, terns, and frigatebirds as well as those who survive in colder waters, such as gulls, and kittiwakes. Readers will also find a fascinating description of the gannet and learn how it can safely “dive into the sea at speeds of 60 miles an hour from an impressive height of up to 100 feet” to feed.

From sea birds, readers move on to freshwater birds like ducks, swans, grebes, and Canada geese. Even the bright flamingo is here with its distinctive scoop-shaped beak that is “uniquely designed to be used upside down and helps them to filter out tiny brine shrimps and blue-green algae from the water, which, when digested, give them their pink color.” The flamingo isn’t the only bird with an unusual way to acquire their prey, and kids will discover the clever ways pelicans, herons, and kingfishers (which use “objects such as sticks, feathers, and even discarded popcorn as lures”) find food.

And then there are the “more than 50 bird species across the world [that] stay firmly on the ground (or on water)” or just “choose not to fly very often.” These flightless birds include kiwis, kākāpōs, southern cassowaries, ostriches, and Penguins. Penguins vary in size, from the “little penguin (also known as the fairy or blue penguin)” which comes to shore to nest only at night and stave off predators with their oversized voices, to the emperor penguin. Occasional fliers include great bustards, domestic chickens, and tinamous.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-birds-explore-their-extraordinary-world-penguin

Image copyright Angela Harding, 2020, text copyright Miranda Krestovnikoff, 2020. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

When you hear about extravagant birds, you most likely think of tropical birds. “Rainforests are packed with a range of incredible species with dazzling plumage and bizarre courtship displays.” Readers will learn about the appearance and mating rituals of scarlet macaws, Raggiana birds of paradise, and the Andean cock-of-the-rock. A detailed description of the bowerbird and the male bird’s careful and artistic nest (or bower) building is funny, poignant, and even a little bit human. Then readers are treated to some tropical bird extremes: smallest bird, longest bill, and smelliest as well as a poisonous species and one that makes its own musical instrument.

Of course, woodlands are the home of many bird species, and in the chapter on Tree Dwellers, readers learn about acorn woodpeckers and great hornbills that use trees for food and shelter; tawny frogmouths and potoos that use trees for camouflage; and nuthatches, greater honeyguides, and yellow-bellied sapsuckers, which find all the food they need among the bark, leaves, and branches of trees.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-birds-explore-their-extraordinary-world-chickens

Image copyright Angela Harding, 2020, text copyright Miranda Krestovnikoff, 2020. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

Next up are passerines, or perching birds, which make up the “largest group of birds, with over half of all known species falling into this category.” Corvids, a group that includes the common raven, crows, magpies, and rooks, are considered to be the most intelligent birds. “These birds have a remarkable ability to solve problems in order to find food, in some cases performing better than young children or chimpanzees!” Readers will be impressed with their tricks and clever use of tools (that even include cars). Children learn about cooperative breeders, which rely on their extended family to help raise the young from year to year. Passerines also include many of the garden birds we find in our backyards and which fill the air with song. Readers discover facts about blue tits, robins, and finches in this section.

The next sections give detailed and interesting information on the features we most associate with birds: their feathers, beaks, eyes, nesting habits, eggs, migration patterns, and birdsong. The book ends with perhaps the most adaptable birds in the world: those that make their homes on glaciers, mountain tops, and in the Arctic snow as well as urban birds, which live among people in crowded cities, nesting on tall cathedrals and skyscrapers and foraging for food in garbage cans and on the street.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-birds-explore-their-extraordinary-world-woodpeckers

Image copyright Angela Harding, 2020, text copyright Miranda Krestovnikoff, 2020. Courtesy of Calkins Creek.

For young ornithologists, Miranda Krestovnikoff, a wildlife expert, offers a compelling, eye-opening, and accessible introduction to a wide variety of birds, placing them in their natural environments and revealing intriguing facts and tantalizing tidbits that inform and will spark a continued interest in learning more about the world’s feathered creatures. Krestovnikoff’s engaging writing style will captivate readers and keep them turning the pages to discover birds that are both familiar and new to them. The comprehensive nature of the book allows kids in all parts of the world to learn more about their native birds while creating a global connection with these most recognized and widely distributed creatures.

Accompanying Krestovnikoff’s text are Angela Harding’s beautiful linocuts that depict birds in mid-flight, capturing prey on land and water, engaging in mating rituals, and building and protecting their nests and young. Harding’s use of natural colors and exquisitely etched landscapes set off each bird in breathtaking illustrations that invite readers to linger to enjoy their full impact. Each illustration is captioned with the bird’s species.

A gorgeous and educational book that readers of all ages will love dipping into again and again, Birds: Explore their extraordinary world is a must for bird lovers and highly recommended for home, school, and public libraries.

Ages 7 and up

Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2020 | ISBN 78-1408893913

Discover more about Miranda Krestovnikoff and her books on her website.

To learn more about Angela Harding, her books, and her art on her website.

National Audubon Day Activities

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-beautiful-birds-word-search

Beautiful Birds Word Search Puzzle

 

It’s fun to watch for different kinds of birds when you take a walk or in your own backyard. Can you find the names of twenty types of birds in this printable Beautiful Birds Word Search Puzzle? Here’s the Solution!

cpb-bird-feeder-i

Pinecone Bird Feeder

 

Pinecone bird feeders are quick to make and great for your backyard fliers. The combination of peanut butter, lard, or vegetable shortening and a quality seed mixture provide birds with the fat and nutrition they need to stay warm and healthy during the winter.

Supplies

  • Pinecones
  • Peanut butter, vegetable shortening, or lard
  • Birdseed
  • String
  • Knife or wooden spreader
  • Spoon

Directions

  1. Tie a long length of string around the middle of the pinecone
  2. Spread the peanut butter, vegetable shortening, or lard on the pinecone
  3. Sprinkle a thick coating of birdseed on the pinecone, pressing it into the covering so it will stick
  4. Tie the pinecone feeder onto a tree branch or other structure
  5. Watch the birds enjoy their meal!

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-birds-explore-their-extraordinary-world-cover

You can find Birds: Explore their extraordinary world at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

February 25 – It’s National Bird Feeding Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-find-a-bird-cover

About the Holiday

Spring comes early for our feathered friends. You may have noticed more bird activity in the past few weeks as birds get ready to build nests and mate. February can be a tough month for these little creatures, though. In some places snow still covers the ground, and the spring blooms that offer nutrition haven’t sprouted yet. To remedy this situation, in 1994 John Porter read a resolution into the United States’ Congressional record recognizing February as National Bird-Feeding Month. One-third of the American population have backyard feeders that provide the sustenance birds need to survive. To celebrate, if you have feeders make sure they are well stocked. If you don’t have a feeder in your yard, consider hanging one. Enjoying the beauty and songs of birds is a day brightener!

How to Find a Bird

Written by Jennifer Ward | Illustrated by Diana Sudyka

 

If you have or know of a child who is fascinated by birds, then How to Find a Bird will pique their interest and entice them to get outside to look for birds—those obvious as they fly by and those who take a bit of detective work to spot. As Jennifer Ward assures young birders: “There are a lot of ways to find a bird. That’s the wonderful thing about birds.” She then reveals helpful tips for spying on birds without scaring them away. Being “quiet is good.” How quiet? “So quiet you can hear your heartbeat.”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-find-a-bird-swan

Image copyright Diana Sudyka, 2020, text copyright Jennifer Ward, 2020. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

But where can birds be found? Sure, we all know birds fly, but Ward reminds readers to “look down, low to the ground, where some birds forage” for food on land and in the water. And Ward reveals other reasons besides grabbing a meal that birds may be found at feet level instead of overhead. Between down below and up in the sky, there’s eye level. But to find a bird here, “you will have to have a sharp eye” as it may be cleverly camouflaged. “Of course, you can always look up to find a bird too!” But even here you may find surprises.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-find-a-bird-ground-birds

Image copyright Diana Sudyka, 2020, text copyright Jennifer Ward, 2020. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

If you make your home and yard welcoming, Ward says, you won’t have to search for them, the birds will come to you. They may talk to you or warn other birds about you. “And if you feed them, they will come. Then all you need is a window to find a bird.” But there is one sure way to find a bird that doesn’t involve looking at all. So closer your eyes… and listen: “‘Honk! Honk!’ ‘Cheerily cheerily cheerily.’ ‘Who cooks for you who cooks for you?’ That’s the wonderful thing about birds.”

Backmatter includes a discussion about birdwatching, a list of tools and tips, where to find distinguishing marks on birds, how to create a life list, and resources for becoming a citizen scientist.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-find-a-bird-desert

Image copyright Diana Sudyka, 2020, text copyright Jennifer Ward, 2020. Courtesy of Beach Lane Books.

Jennifer Ward’s joyful, lyrical storytelling invites kids to engage in the rewarding activity of birdwatching. Whether readers would like to make it a hobby or just become more observant to their surroundings, How to Find a Bird shows kids easy ways to enjoy watching birds and discovering their behaviors without disturbing them or their habitats. By reminding children to take a broad approach to finding birds, Ward reveals the wide variety of birds that populate our planet, their behaviors, and their defenses. Ward’s direct address makes readers feel they’re already part of this exciting activity that can become a lifelong love.

Diana Sudyka’s charming, realistic illustrations of more than fifty species of birds take kids to marshlands and rocky deserts, lakeshores and beaches, a bright blue sky and a flower-filled backyard. Along the way kids get a look at families of California quails and tundra swans; a northern flicker gobbling ants; an anhinga tossing a minnow; burrowing owls underground; and a long-eared owl, an eastern whip-poor-will, and a brown creeper hiding in plain sight among many others. Readers will also see some birds who have become extinct and several matched with their song. Sudyka’s vibrant images show birds in motion and at rest. A careful study of the pages will reward kids with enchanting details and a couple of surprising hidden birds.

For nature buffs, bird lovers, and school or homeschooling environmental lessons, How to Find a Bird is an enchanting introduction to birds and birdwatching and would be a terrific take-along on outdoor outings. The book would be a quick favorite on home bookshelves and an excellent reference for classroom and public library collections.

Ages 4 – 8

Beach Land Books, 2020 | ISBN 978-1481467056

Discover more about Jennifer Ward and her books on her website.

To learn more about Diana Sudyka, her books, and her art, visit her website.

National Bird Feeding Month Activity

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-bird-on-reed-coloring-page

Bird Coloring Pages

 

The birds you usually see in your area may not be back from their winter vacation yet, but you can still enjoy some beautiful birds with these coloring pages.

Owl in the Forest | Bird on a Reed | Bird on a Branch

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-how-to-find-a-bird-cover

You can find How to Find a Bird at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million

To support your local independent bookstore, order from

Bookshop | IndieBound

Picture Book Review