July 5 – It’s National Culinary Arts Month

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spoon-cover

About the Holiday

There’s a real art to putting together a delicious meal from a bunch of seemingly disparate parts, and this month’s holiday honors those with a talent for combining tastes, flavors, and textures. While we celebrate food and those who make it, though, we might also take a moment to think about the utensils that help us cook and eat. Without the proper kitchen tools and tableware, those perfectly planned dishes just would not be the same. To make your Culinary Arts Month a little more cutting edge, why not research the history of cutlery and—of course—enjoy a dip into today’s adorable book!

Spoon

Written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal | Illustrated by Scott Magoon

 

Spoon comes from a large, diverse family. He enjoys visiting his Aunt Silver, who is “very fancy and proper” and says things like “‘Good-bye, darling!’” and “‘Ta-ta!’” He also likes to hear the story of how his great-grandmother “fell in love with a dish and ran off to a distant land.” But one day Spoon’s mother noticed that he was looking “‘a bit bent out of shape.’”

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spoon-family-portrait

Copyright Scott Magoon, 2009, courtesy of scottmagoon.com.

Spoon confessed that he thought his friends had it better than he did. Spoon thought Knife was lucky because he got to cut and spread, and his mother had to agree that Knife was “pretty spiffy.” “‘And Fork, Fork is so lucky!’” Spoon exclaimed. Fork got to go all sorts of places, like hot barbecues, leafy salads, and spongy cakes. She even got to twirl spaghetti like a lasso. And then there were Chopsticks. They were so “cool and exotic.” Again Spoon’s mom had to concede that Fork and Chopsticks were rather special.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spoon-family-chopsticks

Copyright Scott Magoon, 2009, courtesy of scottmagoon.com.

But Spoon may have been interested to know what his friends thought about him. Just then, Knife was telling his dad that Spoon was so lucky because he got to have fun and be silly, like when people used him to drum on a pot. Fork thought it was really neat that Spoon got “‘to measure stuff. No one ever does that with me,’” she said. And Chopsticks? They wished that something they could do things alone.

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spoon-family-drumming

Copyright Scott Magoon, 2009, courtesy of scottmagoon.com.

That night as Spoon’s mom tucked him into bed, she said, “‘You know, Spoon—I wonder if you realize just how lucky you are.’” She reminded him of the fun he had “diving headfirst into a bowl of ice cream,’” how he made a musical clink against the side of a bowl, and how cozy it was to “‘relax in a hot cup of tea.’” His mom’s words cheered him and kept him awake thinking of all the things he could do. He popped out of bed and told his mom and dad that he couldn’t sleep. For which they had the perfect snuggley solution….

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spoon-family-measuring

Copyright Scott Magoon, 2009, courtesy of scottmagoon.com.

This classic tale from Amy Krause Rosenthal is the perfect recipe for those times when kids feel others have it better, show more talent, or are luckier than they are. Written with a combination of wistfulness and humor, the story acknowledges the doubt everyone feels as some time or another while also presenting food for thought about ones place in the world, individual talents, and the simple pleasures of life that leads to self-realization and higher self-esteem for the story’s young audience.

From the Silverware family portrait to the dancing chopsticks to the final, sweet image of Dad, Mom, and little Spoon snuggling together on their sugar packet pillows, Scott Magoon’s clever take on the lives of tableware will charm kids and adults alike.  Endearing touches—like the utensils’ thread-thin arms and legs and the drawer-divider bedrooms—will capture the imagination of little readers, reinforcing the story’s gentle message each time them dive into their favorite meal.

Ages 2 – 6

Disney Hyperion, 2009 |ISBN 978-1423106852

To learn more about Amy Krause Rosenthal’s books for children and adults, her videos, and foundation, visit her official website.

Discover more about Scott Magoon, his books, and his art on his website.

National Culinary Arts Month Activity

 celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-spoon-flowers

Spoon Flowers Craft

 

Plastic spoons aren’t just for enjoying yummy treats, they make cute flowers too! With this easy and quick craft, you can give everyone you love a bouquet!

Supplies

  • Colorful plastic spoons
  • Heavy stock paper or construction paper in various colors, including green for leaves
  • Multi-surface glue or hot glue gun

Directions

  1. Cut petals from the heavy stock paper or construction paper
  2. Glue the petals to the bowl of the spoon
  3. Cut leaves from the green paper (optional)
  4. Glue leaves to the handle of the spoon (optional)

celebrate-picture-books-picture-book-review-spoon-cover

You can find Spoon at these booksellers

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-a-Million | IndieBound

Picture Book Review

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